Saving up to buy my first horse

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by santanna, Feb 13, 2018.

?

How tall is the average horse

  1. 14-15 hands

    77.8%
  2. 15-16 hands

    33.3%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. santanna

    santanna Registered

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    hey guys so..I am saving up to buy my first horse and are wondering what tips you have...my mom told me i have to save up 1 year worth or boarding fees first then she will get me the horse...
    first 1 thing we have to get straight
    I dont need some super fance off the track throughbred..also im just looking at enough my horse would be able to stay in the out door field...That also comes with use of full facilitys and other things

    so please be nice and give me some tips on saving money
     
  2. bellalou

    bellalou Senior Member

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    In some areas, you can find barns that will give you a discount if you help with chores. That's what I did when I was your age (I got paid in riding lessons instead of money because my dad paid for the horses but it was a huge bonus). I know that's sometimes hard nowadays when kids have so much less free time than I did, but it's something to think about.

    If you work with a trainer or instructor, enlist his or her help in finding a horse. People like that often hear about great horses and can help you get them for reasonable prices because the owner knows they're going to someone trustworthy. They can also help you find a horse suitable for your skill level.

    Pay for a pre-purchase exam. It's really tempting not to get one but it can save you a lot of money and heartache in the long run. My best friend fell in love with a horse when she was about your age and bought her without a PPE. The horse had horribly bad hocks and could never do much beyond be a gentle walk-trot horse. She was a sweetie and my friend kept her until the day she died, but she missed out on doing a lot of things she would have liked to.

    If you can and if you haven't already, join Pony Club or a horse-oriented 4-H club. I learned a ton about horse care, first aid, nutrition, and of course riding from my time in 4-H. All those things can save you money because you can do more on your own and you learn how to prevent injury or illness rather than just react to it.

    Buy good tack. You can often find good stuff used. I'd rather buy good used tack than new, not-so-good. Good tack, well taken care of, will last a lifetime. I still have my first saddle that I bought when I was 13. I'm 57 now. I finally stopped riding in it about 8 years ago but only because it doesn't fit my horse. And it was at least 30 years old when I bought it!

    That's all I can think of off the top of my head. Good luck! :)
     
  3. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Most people would say to take lessons for a while first.
     
  4. santanna

    santanna Registered

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    I understand...But i have taken LOTS of riding lessons and ..I know this doesn't mean much but at my summer camp we learn not only everything about riding but also everything from proper nutrition to how to read a horses body language...but i DO understand where you are coming from
     
  5. santanna

    santanna Registered

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  6. RG NIGHT HEIR

    RG NIGHT HEIR Senior Member

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    I always recommend to lease a horse for about a year or longer before buying your own.
    There are many places that would hire working students, you have to tack,untacked get horses medicine etc.Free lessons or boarding might be the pay for you.
     
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  7. jojozwiebel

    jojozwiebel Full Member

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    I second leasing a horse. Alleviates bills and less responsibility.
     
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  8. Rhythm 'n Blues

    Rhythm 'n Blues Senior Member

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    what level or rider are you? Are you still taking lessons while you save? Do you have a job? Who's paying for tack & other bills besides the purchase price of the horse & the board??
     
    Alsosusieq2 likes this.
  9. jojozwiebel

    jojozwiebel Full Member

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    Just to add on what I stated. I was able to lease my first horse (it was a different situation) and able to lease my second horse (normal situation). I have leased to own him. I got him for "free", basically his owner did not want him on her property as she is older but if I ever get rid of him she gets first dibs.

    Leasing will allow you to make a deal with another person. Maybe you ride 3 times a week at their place and pay a small fee or take up care for the horse. Or you can do an offsite lease where you just pay for the horses expenses. This way you don't have to pay for a horse and responsibilities. Something to look into in my opinion is a free lease situation where you keep the horse on your property/barn of choice and pay for regular expenses. Then the owner can cover any major bills. You get to enjoy a horse and the owner can earn some money and keep their horse in work. A lot of college students do this as they don't have the time to exercise their horse regularly but don't want to sell them.
     
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  10. GotaDunQH

    GotaDunQH Senior Member

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    I would look into leasing a horse as well, that comes with lessons. You can NEVER have enough lessons.....and I'm talking years. I've been riding/showing horses for 55 years and I still get coached by my trainers. There is SO MUCH to learn in the horse industry because it changes all the time....I don't know anyone that could learn it all in a lifetime.
     

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