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Sand Colic Prevention: Psyllium vs. Flax Seed

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by IheartDuke, Aug 10, 2007.

  1. IheartDuke

    IheartDuke Senior Member

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    Anything that I would do I would have to provide myself. Money is a little tighter than usual this month:( :no:

    May be tricky and possibly expensive as I have one horse that shares a paddock with one other horse, and my other horse (Buddy) shares a medium dry pasture with 5 other horses...the pasture is boundaried by electrical fencing only. Anyone have any ideas as to what cheap things I may be able to pick up for hay feeders? Old wooden wine barrels????
     
  2. Heavenly Jumper

    Heavenly Jumper Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Hay nets can be pretty cheap :)
     
  3. IheartDuke

    IheartDuke Senior Member

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    Good idea....I thought it was better for horses to eat with their head down for digestion....?
     
  4. Heavenly Jumper

    Heavenly Jumper Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Not if they're eating sand and dirt ;) You can also hang the nets lower as well...when I used them outside hung about chest level. Just look out for horses who may paw and stick a foot in one...
     
  5. tbtrainer

    tbtrainer Senior Member

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    Great thread.. I have never had a case of sand colic, but am starting to worry because it is so dry here.. our pastures are drying up, and we throw hay over the fence where our yearlings and QH are out.. I noticed the other day that there is hardly any grass along the fence now, and my one gelding (yearling) was eating gobs of dirt for a few minutes... he is the only horse at the farm that I have witnessed doing that, he gets three meals a day and hard to imagine that it's a deficiancy. I may go ahead and treat him with Psyllium, just to be on the safe side.
     
  6. Mutrok

    Mutrok Senior Member+

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    I live in the land of sand colic....

    Know how to spot a California horse owner.....psyllium and bottled water...hehe!!

    Anyway I digress...yes more hay a definate must. I feed all of my horses on rubber matts because they just dump hay out of feeders and eat it off the ground anyway. I also feed psyllium once a month for 7 days and mix it with flax seed and beet pulp. I am pretty agressive with it in my babies because it is quite common in So Cal for babbies to get sand colic.

    If they do have lots of sand in their guts it will be painful when it starts to move out and you may see them act worse before they get better. A small dose of bannamine 2x a day can help them get through it.
     
  7. Sue B

    Sue B Senior Member+

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    I think that some good suggestions have already been offered...but to address your questions about flax vs psyllium....

    Yes, flax and psyllium work the same. However, the question would be how much flax and how much psyllium. In general, flax is fed at a rate of 2-4 oz/day (when feeding just flax). However, you are feeding a supplement with flax in it that has no mention (that I could find) of how much flax per serving. When fed at recommended amounts, flax only supplies approx. 45g fiber/4 oz. Psyllium supplements generally provided 100+g/serving.

    Amd, yes, Metamucil and other similar human products are similar to the horse products...however, again, how much are you providing and how much of that is actuall psyllium fiber?

    Now for the duh part....it was already mentioned, but it really makes no sense to me that horses should need an product that provides "extra" fiber in their diet. If fed properly, at least 80% of their diet should contain forage (fiber) and the rest might contain additional forms of fiber such as flax, BOSS, brans, grains, beet pulp and forage pellets/cubes. Proper feeding practices coupled with management that helps limit intake should go a longway in management of sand colic situations.
     
  8. shakti21

    shakti21 Banned

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    I have studied alor about flax seed and the oil, but havent heard about it being used for what you ask.

    but I agree you need to get them to stop eating the sand because that is definitely nat batural.
     
  9. cowboysmom

    cowboysmom Full Member

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    Question?

    :rolleyes: Why does a horse eat dirt? When I turn my gelding into his pasture, there is one patch of ground that is bare. That is the first place he heads, grabs a couple mothfuls of dirt and moves on? Is he missing something that I should be feeding? I feed him twice a day- he pastures for several hours a day and then I keep hay in front of him most of the rest of the day.

    Our feed is mixed for us at the feed mill. I can't tell you EXACTLY what is in it, but the guy asked me TONS of questions then mixed it for me. Said everything he needs should be in there.
     
  10. StarfireArizona

    StarfireArizona Senior Member+

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    I have a 3 month old foal who takes mouthfuls of dirt too. He has been doing this for a couple months. He gets hay, pellets, complete feed & of course mama. I also give him 1/2 the amount of psillium I give the 3 adults the first 7 days of every month.
     

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