Safe laminitis diet?

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by endurgirl, Sep 24, 2018.

  1. endurgirl

    endurgirl Senior Member

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    My senior mare is laminitic. Ugh. She's been removed from the pasture, is on soft sand, "sweet feed" has been stopped. She's getting Bermuda hay, she's had the Banamine and Bute under vet's directions. Ive ordered Easyboot Clouds for comfort.

    Any suggestions on things to feed that are low sugar to help keep weight up? And any other suggestions for comfort. She's getting soaked beet pulp and alfalfa cubes soaked. I thought about in the future adding the carb care feed after this calms down. This is my first laminitis case. Her trim is recent.
     
  2. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    We had one that foundered when I was a kid, he got only whole oats, soaked, and T/A hay light on the A.
     
  3. Kristal H

    Kristal H Senior Member

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    First you need to test your hay. Teff, Blue Grass, and Alfalfa have the lowest amount of NSC. Timothy and Orchard Grass have the highest NSC so I avoid them. I would also avoid all Grainorn, oats, barley. You can buy Beet Pulp, Equis carries Teff pellets, and Triple crown senior are all good feeds.
     
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  4. DocsLglyBlonde

    DocsLglyBlonde Senior Member

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    You want very low sugar, but fats and proteins are good. I would either be testing your hay or soaking it. You unfortunately cannot determine how much sugar is in it without testing. Make sure beet pulp is something safe like speedi-beet, because a lot of BP is not actually low in sugars. Alfalfa is typically safe, but some horses don't tolerate it well. I use Standlee cubes which are low in sugar. Definitely no grass right now. Different vitamin/mineral blends are nice to add to be sure she's getting what she needs if she doesn't need the calories. I love Horsetech High Point. Otherwise, due to the small amount you are feeding, most ration balancers are safe. You want below ~12% NSC, but some horses can tolerate a little more, some a little less. Triple Crown Senior is a grain you can use that will provide more calories and still keeps you below 12% NSC. I'm sure there are others out there too, and those will get her more calories and higher fat for weight maintenance. You definitely don't want her overweight.

    Beyond that, icing acutely is great until pulses and heat are down. I limited movement until she was out of the acute phase, then slowly gave her more and more space to move. With inflammation, laminae can die, and that is what gives you the lack of internal support and founder - it makes sense to me that the less you do until at least the still intact laminae are not vulnerable, the better. I'd get rads once she's out of the acute phase (usually a couple weeks from onset is a safe bet so long as she doesn't still have pulses and heat).

    I would also test for Cushing's with laminitis and being older. Her being sore and stressed (inevitably) will raise her ACTH levels, as will being in what is currently the peak seasonal rise right now. I would at least wait until she is stable and not acute, then test and account for the seasonal rise, and make a decision from there.

    I hope she makes a speedy recovery!! Laminitis sucks :(
     
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  5. Smartee Pants

    Smartee Pants Senior Member

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    Had the same problem with mine this spring. Bloodwork indicated IR but no Cushings. X-rays showed mild rotation - 1-2 deg in one foot and 2-4 in the other. Mine is currently eating TC Lite and no molasses beet pulp (soaked). Is your horse overweight?
     
  6. endurgirl

    endurgirl Senior Member

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    She is not overweight @Smartee Pants . She's lost some weight, but wasn't overweight to begin with. She's a foodie, so i'm sure she can't understand why her foods are so limited. Ive been icing her 2-3 times a day also.

    We feed the standlee alfalfa cubes, i think it's standlee beet pulp also. I'll have to check if it's the non molasses though.
     
  7. JStorry

    JStorry Senior Member

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    While you are waiting for the boots if she's in an acute stage you can make 'shoes' with construction Styrofoam. I like the 2 inch pink stuff. Trace out the shape of her foot, and duct tape the living hell out of it to get it stay on. Don't tape above the the hoof, but you can go almost up to the hairline. It will compress but you can just make a new pair pretty cheap when it gets too flat. I've done this to a few client horses and it seems to provide immediate relief
     
  8. LoveTrail

    LoveTrail Senior Member

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    When I found out my horse had IR, last test his insulin was 17.43, so at the lower end of an IR horse, I added ground flax, salt and chaste berry. He was 37.4 two months prior to the second test. I also had added magnesium just prior to the results which appears to be good for IR horses too. My horse so far hasn't gotten laminitis. Though his hooves have swelled from inflammation. I have a recent x-ray of one foot and my farrier was so happy to see how good that foot looked especially given his age of 16.

    This is a very good site to get ideas on feed. I was told not to feet Vitamin E or Selenium to my horse because he was already high on both. Treatment of Insulin Resistance

    Good luck!
     
  9. Circle C

    Circle C Senior Member

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    Low NSC hay and grain free... or if you have to feed grain, something that is 10% NSC or less.
     
  10. LoveTrail

    LoveTrail Senior Member

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    My horse was at his worst in IR when he atrophied last year. He was on a super low NSC grass hay, 6%, but on a high NSC feed with corn, around 20%. I do wonder if our grass hay might have lots of iron and is why he has issues with it. Iron over load can be an issue too for IR horses. So right now is just on alfalfa. I'm going to try after show season the grass hay one more time for his afternoon feed so I can see how he reacts. In the past it made him super anxious. Happened twice.
     

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