Saddleseat neck position

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by baymax2018, Jan 30, 2019.

  1. baymax2018

    baymax2018 Full Member

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    @GotaDunQH do you know who she went to? The saddlebred world seems to be pretty small :) PM me if you don't want to share publicly.
     
  2. NBChoice

    NBChoice Senior Member

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    What's your guy's reg name if you dont mind me asking?
     
  3. baymax2018

    baymax2018 Full Member

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    I just messaged you :)
     
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  4. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    The thing is...Saddlebreds vary a lot. And there are different Saddleseat classes designed to be fitting for each type.

    The key is to really be practical and to aim the horse at the kind of class most suited to him.

    With this horse...I dunno. He's used to one way of going, and he's getting a big make over. I don't think I'd do it. If a Saddlebred was really good at dressage, he'd be worth a huge pile of money. I think if I wanted to ride Saddleseat and I was new to it, I'd buy a trained Saddle seat horse, and send my dressage horse along to a nice dressage owner.

    Because...no, I disagree with what you said before(that if you can take a horse from saddle seat to dressage, then it's an equivalent thing to take him from dressage to saddle seat). Though horses can be turned from saddle seat to dressage, it's usually done by getting them out of saddle seat training asap. And in fact, I think it's very hard to take a horse that's trained in dressage and switch him over to saddle seat.


     
  5. NBChoice

    NBChoice Senior Member

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    I agree that usually you see a SS horse going to a different discipline such as dressage or hunt seat, not the other way around as commonly. But there are show horses that do both pretty frequently. I know of a few that do SS, western and hunt seat. Depends on the horse obviously.

    I think the OP is a smart cookie and wont push her horse in a direction if hes not able to. Maybe he will do great though!
     
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  6. baymax2018

    baymax2018 Full Member

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    He isn’t going back the dressage route. Sorry. Not gonna happen. I’ve been through the ringer with dressage trainers and this horse. One whipped him and told me that he had no respect when he was absolutely terrified. Another had him walking on his hind end and striking. The third was nice but informed me that saddlebreds can’t canter and so he wasn’t trainable, which is bullpucky. All the while I was working with this horse and he was fine with me.

    Since there are not an unlimited supply of dressage trainers and I’ve now been burned three times in the span of a year, we aren’t doing that again.

    And I’m not selling him either. He is clearly my horse.

    He is doing very well switching and what I was really asking about was if my understanding of the action of the saddleseat type of martingale is correct, which it appears to be, which would be counterproductive to the way we want him to go.
     
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  7. baymax2018

    baymax2018 Full Member

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    No, I won’t push him to do something that is unsuitable which is precisely why I’ve taken him out of the other situations. I’m sorry I sound a bit prickly, but it has not been an easy go in the last year and I finally feel like we are on a good path.
     
  8. GotaDunQH

    GotaDunQH Senior Member

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    Tom and Linda Weber...I don't think they are in New Hampshire anymore. Their assistant trainer was a young woman named JJ.
     
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  9. baymax2018

    baymax2018 Full Member

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    Thanks!

    I'm going to talk to my trainer about riding him with the two rein configuration, just to see what happens. He doesn't really need any "nose tucking" action, as his major fault as a dressage horse was that he tended to curl, particularly when he would get behind the leg. He's now responding to the bit as a saddleseat horse is expected to do (he still was not taking the bit to the level that my dressage trainers wanted, so I think this is good).

    I'm quite familiar with folks going from saddleseat to dressage, in fact, that's what my very first saddlebred did, she was a dressage horse. It's how I fell in love with the breed. These horses are not for everyone, because they are quite hot and sensitive, but they are super smart and personable. They are a lot like my dobermans, including being in your pocket and all over you constantly LOL

    I've also seen young saddleseat saddlebreds started, and their natural head carriage is very similar to my horse's natural carriage. So I don't think I'm far off. And it's not like I'm talking about putting pads on him and going into a park class. I'm talking about Country Pleasure (he will already make a very nice Hunter Country Pleasure horse in the state he's in now). The Country Pleasure saddlebreds are natural saddlebreds. Not allowed to wear tailsets or pads. I'm also teaching him to drive, because I'm older now and there's a good chance my body won't hold up over a long period of time to riding and since he's young, and these horses tend to live useful lives for a very long time, I'll need something to fall back on.

    My trainer originally thought that my horse would only be worth using as a lesson horse, and just like you slc, urged me to sell him. I didn't because of what we'd been through, and as he's come through training she's been shocked and surprised at how well he has been doing. She hasn't done much to change him other than long line him and get him to go forward.

    His new horseshoer, who happens to be a saddlebred guy, took a look at him once I took his blanket off and said he ought to be a brilliant mover with his conformation. When he saw him move, he said oh yeah, he'll make a nice hunter country pleasure horse this year but if you work him, he'll give you more I'll bet. He was great, knew all the bloodlines and helped me a lot with the way my horse thinks since he's got a bunch of his exact bloodline in his barn. My trainer says that if he keeps working the way he's working he'll be an incredibly versatile horse. I believe it, he's handy. And he loves to trail ride too (his only issue there is that someone let him eat grass on trail rides and he gets upset when I don't permit him to).

    It seems to me that the people who get the most up at arms about my horse and his prospects are the dressage people who don't do saddleseat. Before I understood saddleseat, I probably would have been like that too. But I've learned a lot since I got him, and I don't feel the same way anymore. Now my problem is finding more learning opportunities. Seems hard to have a conversation on the web that gets beyond the relative merits of the discipline. I'd like to get past that and learn. I wish trot.org was still around, but it is not. I'm on a bunch of facebook groups but it doesn't seem to attract people with the same cerebral approach. I just bought Smith Lilly's DVDs and maybe those will help me understand.

    Thanks to those who did contribute useful comments!
     
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  10. NBChoice

    NBChoice Senior Member

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    Oh man, me too. What a wealth of knowledge that place was!
     

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