Roundworms in 2 year old

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by mkoktavy, Apr 21, 2017.

  1. Ryle

    Ryle Senior Member

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    Actually, in the northern US and Canada you can deworm in the fall and not do a fecal until spring because the weather conditions and management (feeding hay rather than pasture) lead to low reinfection rates.
     
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  2. Ryle

    Ryle Senior Member

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    Rather than this, I would do a dose of pyrantel (strongid) or fenbendazole and then Quest 2 weeks later.
     
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  3. Ryle

    Ryle Senior Member

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    At 2, your horse should have a pretty good resistance to ascarids at this point however you may have a high environmental concentration of eggs and your management practices may be contributing to reinfection. Not having a completely negative count isn't the end of the world, so I wouldn't get terribly worried about it, but I would look at how you are managing your pasture/paddock. Picking up feces and not feeding off the ground will go a long way towards reducing reinfection rates even more.
     
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  4. mkoktavy

    mkoktavy Senior Member

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    Thanks for your reply! I think I will try maybe the Pyrantel as I haven't used that lately and the last I dewormed I used Ivermectin already.

    That's where I'm confused, the horses do all live outside but the paddocks are very well maintained. This time of year here is VERY wet and muddy, our BO harrows and flattens the paddocks as much as he can and right now the paddocks have completely dried up and are nice and flat. On top of that, it is a family farm, they have THREE autistic boys that all have their duties and one of them is taking the gator and pick up poop in all the paddocks once a day (as long as the gator can make it in without getting stuck in the mud). This is why I'm thinking he's been carrying the worms this whole time and they may be resistant... I will try the Pyrantel and Quest, and I will do another fecal in July and see how that goes.

    Thank you all for your replies!
     
  5. tlkidding

    tlkidding Senior Member

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    You need to do Quest Plus, not just Quest.
     
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  6. mkoktavy

    mkoktavy Senior Member

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    Perfect, thank you.
     
  7. Kristal H

    Kristal H Senior Member

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    Quest Plus is if you have tapeworms.... Plain quest will kill round worms.
     
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  8. Mirage

    Mirage Senior Member

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    Ok. This may or may not be stupid and totally wrong.

    I read a while back that worm eggs can survive for quite a while in a pasture or stall.
    Would it work to pen the horses in a smaller pasture, spray an insecticide that will kill the worm eggs but is safe for horses after some time, then (when it's safe) worm the horses and put them out on the clean pasture?
     
  9. mkoktavy

    mkoktavy Senior Member

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    Thanks for the suggestion, I get where your coming from ... but they still eat off the ground, and I would not want my horse to eat where any sort of insecticide was used. I can see too many complications with that!
    Since the horses live outside, there really isn't another paddock we can put them in anyway. I don't think it would be a permanent fix in our situation even if it was feasable.
     
  10. Ryle

    Ryle Senior Member

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    Roundworm eggs can survive in the environment for 10 years or more. Small strongyles don't survive that long, but they can overwinter and they can survive for several months with moderate temperatures. There are also no pesticides that kill these parasite eggs and larva. That is why pasture maintenance is so important.
     

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