"Round pen him until he can't run anymore"

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by bellalou, Dec 13, 2016.

  1. NBChoice

    NBChoice Senior Member

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    A long time ago my oldest mare was a hard loader. Someone told me to throw small rocks at her hind legs to get her in the trailer.
    Huh??
     
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  2. TheSnowLeopard

    TheSnowLeopard Senior Member

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    That sounds like a great way to make a horse terrified of trailers. o_O
     
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  3. Binca

    Binca Senior Member

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    Only small ones? Why not big ones? If you throw a boulder or two she might get the idea! :p
     
  4. NBChoice

    NBChoice Senior Member

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    You're right... I probably should have tried the big rocks!! :ROFLMAO:
     
  5. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I've seen someone do this, but they were tiny pebbles.

    I don't think this is a great plan. I'd rather train the horse to get in the trailer. But to be realistic, physically, it's probably nothing more than the horse would get if he were trotting around a paddock with some pebbles on the ground.

    I'm not sure I'd encourage anyone to do it, because someone would decide to throw jagged shrapnel at the horse, or shoot things at him with a gun, or whatever.

    Having seen someone actually back a trailer up to a horse in front of a wall (''I'm gonna squeeze him in") and having seen someone drag a horse behind a moving forward trailer("It'll teach him it's better to get in the trailer"), and having seen someone leave an unhitched trailer in a paddock with the only available food and water in it("I didn't think it would roll, I had it blocked real good"), I'd say that people think of enough stupid things already, when it comes to horses that don't load.

    I think the key is that, many horses, after years and years of being whipped, longe lined, pulled, squeezed with panels, and screamed at and beaten to get in the trailer, you can no longer get anywhere near them, with any kind of equipment or any kind of handling, without prompting an explosion.

    It would probably be better to just spend a few months quietly training them to get in the trailer, than to chuck pebbles at them, whether the pebbles are small or not.

    But that would require thinking ahead.
     
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  6. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    Once in a blue moon you get me, I almost couldn't stop laughing. I know it's not supposed to be funny as these are real scenarios..kind of scary, but the irony of the stupidity of humans.. who supposedly are more intelligent got me. Yep. I swear you'd think it was rocket science.
     
  7. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    This problem with him and Parelli comes from working with QHs who are more laidback than they are goey. It'll work with some of them, and particularly with those that would rather rest than move, but not on the horses who would rather move than load, or, who are extremely sensitive or have had bad trailer experiences. That's where reading the horse comes in; you have to look and see what horse you have and what option to use.

    I had a friend whose X died and she inherited the Stud. He hadn't been off the farm or in a trailer in 20+years. 25yo Stud. So, the guy who bought him, who's also a friend of mine, comes to get him, and me with him. A fricken hour we were there. He wouldn't hand him over to me right off. He had this tennis ball on a stick. Told me to tap him on the butt with it, rhythmically, because the theory is that the horse will get just annoyed enough to rather move forward than stand there and be annoyed. Same theory as the pebbles to the cannons.

    Nope. He was standing FACING the horse. He was not relaxed. Finally, I asked him to listen to me: Turn around, face the inside of the trailer, relax your shoulders, look down, relax your leg and rest it. He did, The horse WALKED RIGHT IN.

    Horses take cues from their herdmates. No herdmate? You'll do. Look like you're going to load, not like you're ready to UNLOAD, and the horse just may follow you.

    No, they just either ignore it or kick out at it when they've had enough. They aren't IN the trailer so it isn't actually being associated with the trailer.

    Of course. Tiny pebbles. I don't do that myself. Seen it, don't recommend it.
     
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  8. crolipizzan

    crolipizzan Full Member

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    If you want to get a horse in trailer work him hard close to it so the horse realizes that it is better to be inside the trailer that outside. ;)
     
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  9. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Believe me, the thing about shooting the horse to get him in the trailer isn't something I creatively came up with.

    There was a prominent trainer who stood back of the jumps with a bb gun and shot the horses in the butt when they got near the jump.

    None of his horses stopped at jumps, I will say that for him. But that's all I'd say for him.
     
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  10. PyroTekNik333

    PyroTekNik333 Senior Member

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    Oh lord lol

    My very first horse was a complete basket case that would just as soon run you over as let you put a heater on her.
    Bad advice was plentiful :ROFLMAO:
    Most of it had been employed by previous owner. I opted to not continue with methods that caused the basket case-edness.
    Thankfully i stumbled upon an excellent trainer who helped me train that mare so I didn't end up dead.

    One big problem I see with some of the questionable advice given is a lot of it is rooted on good advice.
    Someone just took it a little sideways.

    It can be hard for a newbie to distinguish between good and bad.

    Probably the craziest one I've ever heard was shoving your hand (or whip/broom handle if it's handy) down the throat of a biter :crazy:
     

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