"Round pen him until he can't run anymore"

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by bellalou, Dec 13, 2016.

  1. Kiesha

    Kiesha Full Member

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    When riding a horse that was in a bit with 4 inch shanks: "Pull his face until he can't breathe!" Uh... no. o_O
     
  2. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Horses who don't like groundwork are horses who ALREADY HAD groundwork and are bored being pulled out and having to do it all the time.

    Yes, it's a hole. Your horse is not averse to groundwork. Your horse can't be averse to something it never had. You probably were too aggressive in your approach to it and ticked the horse off. Some horses are very sensitive and only need YOUR EYES to do groundwork. Didn't use your eyes for the first cue? Yeah, you could have made her so reactive and ticked off that she fights you at the first sign of any of that.

    She should never have any fear of you or any of your equipment on the ground. That's been done since she's first been handled. This is handler error and yeah, it's not the horse who has the problem. You should learn how to do proper groundwork. Watch a Pro do it. You have to read the horse. Every action has an equal and opposite reaction. Her opposition is a sign that your action is too strong to begin with, otherwise her RE-action would not rise to the level it does.
     
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  3. venomvalleyequi

    venomvalleyequi Senior Member

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    Manes-
    Before I got her someone broke the trust and overdid it making her resentful and fearfull. Tell me how I have four others I got as blank slates who do not have any issues but one who the second I hook a line or put in a roundpen is a fire breathing MONSTER? No whips. I point she blows. Screams to me SOMETHING happened prior to me.
     
  4. venomvalleyequi

    venomvalleyequi Senior Member

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    This is the same horse I had to wait out to catch. Same horse who freaked over tack even though she had been broke.

    This was a horse who was given to me as she was unmanageable. Normally you would be right but some horses deny all logic. Most 'pros' will not touch her. Shes a horse that has been manhandled... Roundpens could cost me a vet bill. Take the horse as an individual. Without knowing her....


    She had sat in a field for years. I litterally have had to fight and think outside of the box for years just to get her to come to me. To keep her from charging people. She was dangerous. Shes still unpredictable but has come a long way. I am pushing groundwork (ie lounging) now that I have a hair of her trust. I am going back to fix holes left as I wanted to make her trust me. She likes to ride now. She loads. She ties. She comes when I call. I can lead her anywhere. We can do just about anything now except go on the line. Good days and bad days. She was 10 when I got her. 10 years of being left to herself or handled incorrectly. I feel tgat with her Im doing everything I can to fix past issues.
     
  5. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Lounging is always a great idea. You can get a lawn chair that reclines, a drink with ice and a little umbrella, and a big terry cloth towel, and put on sun tan lotion.

    But it's a little cold outside for a bathing suit.

    And...how do you get the horse to sit on the lawn chair?
     
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  6. NBChoice

    NBChoice Senior Member

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    :ROFLMAO::LOL::ROFLMAO::LOL::crazy2:
     
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  7. CessBee

    CessBee Senior Member

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    Lunging, Lounging, Longing, making your horse run circles, whatever you **** well wanna call it =/= ground work.
     
  8. equicrzy

    equicrzy Senior Member

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    You can call it anything you want, but, lounging is exactly as slc has described and, lunging, well, I'm picturing someone lunging at me, in a threatening manner.

    The term is now and, always has been....longing.

    Call it a pet peeve, but, saying either lounging or, lunging, makes me cringe.
     
  9. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    "Something happened to her" is only one of many possibilities. I think it's a big mistake to assume any horse that 'i point she blows' is always due to abuse. That's possible, but it's just not always the real reason.

    One possibility is that she's simply more sensitive than your other horses. You're tuned to the less sensitive type, and haven't adjusted your cues to the level she needs. To her, you're shouting at her.

    This is incredibly common. Even some of the best horsemen and horsewomen in the world have had this problem, and they freely admit it. In my experience, only the novice believes he can't possibly make a mistake reading a horse and need to adjust his cues.

    There used to be a lovely rider around here who had this Grand Prix dressage horse that was, let's say, safe for the rider. Unless you were concerned about getting cardiac arrest from trying to get it to move. This lady was a lovely rider.

    And when she got her next horse, people got lawn chairs and cold drinks and sandwiches, and hung around to watch. "Here they come again, yup, and there they go! Wow that was fast!"

    That's just reality. That was a rider with 20 years of experience. A lovely rider. And it happened to her. It can happen to anyone.

    The horse may have been very finely tuned, to very subtle cues. You may not be aware of all the motions and movements you make. Some of them may be telling her to go fast and you don't even know you're making that motion. I've seen this time after time. With one gal she was convinced the horse was "a killer" and it was simply reacting and doing exactly what the woman told it to. She had no idea she was smacking the horse in the face with a rope, stepping toward it, whacking it with the longe whip. Too, she was petrified of the horse so her body language was all off, and she used a really rough, gruff tone of voice because she thought the whole thing was a matter of ''disrespect''. Nor was she aware that quite frequently, she simply screamed. LOL. She had no idea she was doing it.

    Another possibility is that she has a medical problem. Vision, hearing, or a reproductive problem that makes her extremely nervous.

    Too, some horses are more visually sensitive than others. Others are more sound sensitive. Some horses are incredibly touch sensitive. They simply are born that way. You can't change it substantially. You have to learn to work with it. That may only be on one part of their body. For example I've ridden young horses that were just starting out, just saddled, and they were pulling at the bit but incredibly sensitive to the knee, or the heel. A horse can be absolutely dull in one sense, and very sharp in another.

    A horse can also simply have an extremely high need for activity. On the usual family schedule, the horse gets ridden two or three times a month, and is jumping out of its skin when being longed, round penned, ridden, etc.

    And a horse can be reacting to some feed. The feed he gets may simply have too many calories overall, or it may have too much corn, or too much soy, or something, that makes the horse nervous.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2017
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  10. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Longeing. Actually. It's from a French term that was originally used in falconry, but at some point got generalized to when you make something go around you, that's the thing you're using to make it go around you.

    Longing is what you feel when you see some handsome or beautiful individual you want to...get to know better.

    Many people use the word 'lunging'. That's in such common use that you can't really fight it. It's like "per say" and left brains and right brains, and learning styles. It doesn't matter what's right.

    And in the US, Western riders used to call it gyping. On a gyp rope.
     

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