"Round pen him until he can't run anymore"

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by bellalou, Dec 13, 2016.

  1. bellalou

    bellalou Senior Member

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    Heard that at the barn a couple of days ago when a very fresh young horse dumped his rider and ran back to his stall. :rolleyez:

    Luckily the rider has more sense than to listen to the person who offered THAT helpful piece of advice but it really does make me cringe sometimes when I hear the stuff some people come out with.

    Another one came from a woman who has not been out to do anything with her horse for almost a year. "We've been remodeling our house," she explained. "And I took a class so that's had me busy."

    I wanted to say, "Yes, I understand - I just finished law school and I'm studying for the bar now" but didn't bother. Why have a horse? I don't get it.

    What's the most jaw-dropping bit of "helpful advice" you've heard lately?
     
  2. Breezah

    Breezah Senior Member

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    Eh. I think there is a time and a place for that sort of discipline. Of course, I don't think it's appropriate for the situation and horse you've described, but wet saddle pad lessons are definitely not ruled out for all horses.

    Personally, I haven't had a lot of non-solicited bad advice recently. Although I made the mistake of telling my very straight-arrow friend about how my boyfriend and I had... smoked some celebratory green.... with my parents at my dad's 50th birthday party last weekend (it was his 50th birthday, and he offered!).... And she acted very concerned and told me I needed to consider getting help for my addiction............. :rolleyes::rolleyez:
     
  3. DunsNPallys

    DunsNPallys Senior Member

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    I recently had one of my rodeo horses start blindly bolting on me during competition. Not at home, or practice, or small stuff. Only on the big stuff, and not always. It seemed to be a fear reaction (and is/was, and being corrected now). Someone told me to put this swivel, long shank spade bit on him and use a throat latch strap to wrap around his lower face and tie the mouth shut so he couldn't fight it. Then proceeded to say the bit I had switched to using mid-competition was "junk" because it was a Martha Josey brand (which it wasn't, or not that I'm aware of, it was just a regular bit I've had for a decade). He made his last run perfectly fine, and seemed to show that person!
     
  4. Friesiangirl

    Friesiangirl Senior Member

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    "If you breed your mare, that'll calm her down"

    Enough said.
     
  5. ~tiffy~

    ~tiffy~ Senior Member

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    I've heard at my new barn, a boarder has told my friend (who also boards there) that she gives her mare too much hay.

    Ummmmm..... Is that possible??
     
  6. Friesiangirl

    Friesiangirl Senior Member

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    It can be for horses that are grossly overweight, but isn't ideal. We have an old haffie that gets limited hay, but it's slow fed and we break it up throughout the day so he's still able to "graze" but even with a greatly reduced amount and lots of work, well...he's a chunker. Clean bill of health just always been able to get fat on air.
     
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  7. Breezah

    Breezah Senior Member

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    It's definitely possible to feed too much hay. Especially if the hay isn't balanced and has lots of sugars. Hay has calories!

    My horses only eat hay, and 2 cups of all purpose feed and 1 cup of flax ONLY after a ride (which is only about twice a week), and they have definitely gained weight in the past few months.
     
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  8. bellalou

    bellalou Senior Member

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    I absolutely agree and I've used them myself. But in that situation the horse was not going to make the slightest connection between dumping his rider and getting round penned to death. Of course, the woman who offered that solution can't bridle her horse so there's that...
     
  9. equicrzy

    equicrzy Senior Member

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    I was once told the same thing.
     
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  10. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    It is extremely possible. Why wouldn't it be possible? Hay has calories. Horses can get too many calories - too much to eat.

    I also know of horses that can't eat an unlimited amount of hay, especially lower quality hay, without aggravating chronic digestive problems like RD colitis.

    The ideal is that the horse gets however may calories it NEEDS, based on its size, weight, ideal weight, amount of work, etc, and that amount of food is divided into as many small meals as possible during the day.

    All horses really cannot, and should not, eat all the time, or eat an unlimited amount of food, or eat 'free choice'. That includes hay.
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2016

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