ROOTING

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by emali06, Feb 20, 2019.

  1. emali06

    emali06 Senior Member

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    I think I will. For some reason I have it in my head that it’s cruel but how could it be when we are a better team with it?
     
  2. Dream27

    Dream27 Senior Member

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    I absolutely do not think a correction bit is cruel at all, especially if you're soft with your hands. Honestly, I've had trainers tell me that Frosty being "rooty" and a little stiff in the snaffle is her way of telling me she's ready for the curb bit. And admittedly, she is much softer and carried herself better in the correction bit. I can use a lot less pressure with the correction, much less even than you'd give leeway for from the leverage action.

    I think you've found the answer to your issues. Maybe he was just trying to tell you what he wanted?
     
  3. emali06

    emali06 Senior Member

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    Perhaps he is. I guess I'll just keep going with what works. I am sure he will find a way to evade and get out of working :)
     
  4. GotaDunQH

    GotaDunQH Senior Member

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    There are simply some horses who would rather have a ported bit in their mouth. ALL of mine are like that....they simply don't like the action of a snaffle and the pressure on the corners of the mouth, and the contact you need with one. DO NOT FEAR a correction bit!
     
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  5. jojozwiebel

    jojozwiebel Senior Member+

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    I agree! Rock and I love our correction bit. We use less pressure. Use it!
     
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  6. emali06

    emali06 Senior Member

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    Okay! No more fear! I know he does prefer a ported bit. He loved the kimberwick I use to have him in. I don't know why I stopped using it? I'm definitely not the sharpest one in this equation. Dang horse is telling me what he wants and I'm over here just letting people get into my head.

    I will use it. Today really showed me the truth. Honestly after about 20 minutes I was like "Okay that was all great, now what?". I did a couple patterns (reining, ranch riding) and cooled him off. It was so simple.
     
  7. NBChoice

    NBChoice Senior Member

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    Keep using it. Sounds like he does much better in it.
    Rain does sooo much better in her double bridle than with her snaffle bit. I really prefer riding her in the double and I think she prefers it too. I don't see anything wrong with riding in something other than a snaffle if the ride is more enjoyable for both human and horse.
     
  8. equinitis

    equinitis Senior Member

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    I had one that rooted in anything that was not ported and/or had some leverage. I lost track of how many times I got my fingers smashed against the saddle horn before I learned to stay in front of it even when plinking around in the pasture. He never quit, no matter what I did, when ridden in a non-ported bit.
    Before I figures out the bit problem, I used two set of reins. I looped one set of "roping" reins around the saddle horn and adjusted them short enough for him to hit those instead of my hands when he rooted. I could let my reins slide through my hands and the roping reins would stop him. That worked pretty well and the rooting was much much less after a couple of rides. It did not stop him though, just slowed him down some and made him not push his nose out quite so hard since it was not comfortable for him.
     
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  9. palogal

    palogal Senior Member

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    Try a Waterford for a ride or two. It's made so there is nothing to root on. It's not a mild bit, or one to be used all the time. Work through your issue with it and then put him back in his bit. Someone mentioned a baucher. That is also called a hanging cheek snaffle. It's more stable and keeps the bit more still in the mouth. I don't see how that would help here.
     
  10. MzCarol

    MzCarol Senior Member

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    Chevy used to be a hoooooooorrible rooter. Push the horse forward. When the horse goes to root, keep your hands fixed and let the horse bump into the bit while pushing the horse forward. For Chevy, once he got off his forehand and got good forward the rooting stopped - and he's only ever been in a snaffle bit (sometimes double jointed, sometimes single jointed).
     

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