ROOTING

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by emali06, Feb 20, 2019.

  1. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    When he roots, use your leg and back it up with a tap of a whip if he doesn't respond immediately. Make him go faster. Every time.
     
  2. Arem

    Arem Senior Member

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    He’s part Arab, if I remember correctly. He might find that to be a reward for rooting and become even more difficult.



    Since he does still evade in the correction bit, just differently (it makes sense that he doesn’t root in that one because of the leverage), the key is going to be finding why he is evading and fix that. He’s unhappy about *something.* It doesn’t have to be pain, especially since you’ve gone down those rabbit trails, it could be something about his other gear, bit types, the way he’s ridden, holes in his training.....

    Brandi used to root. She still will a little bit, but as I’ve filled holes in her training and played with different bits (and the bosal hackamore, Which was the main one for us as I refrained her) but you have to use those right. You can’t just slap it on and ride like it’s a normal bit or hackamore) and Improved myself, She’s much much better.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2019
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  3. Rhythm 'n Blues

    Rhythm 'n Blues Senior Member

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    Strength is another option. Just plain old he doesn’t have the strength to do as asked & hold himself up properly.
     
  4. BluemoonOKy

    BluemoonOKy Senior Member

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    Well, if you think it's you or your timing...That's the solution. Changing bits will not be now nor will it ever be the entire solution. That is novice thinking, and you've been around long enough to not be a novice. Working on yourself and your own center, awareness and alignment then timing of the release will. No substitute for that. It doesn't matter if he's all over the place. Your core, seat and aids are your responsibility. Work on yourself, work on yourself, work on yourself and your horse will improve. He can only be all over the place if you don't help him balance. You probably need to do slow work rather than worrying about cantering, then work up to that when the balance is there. Video is needed for these kinds of threads because who knows what's really going on and it's absurd to even postulate because that will lead to mistakes where a video gives empirical evidence so proper correct advice can be given.
     
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  5. doublelranch

    doublelranch Senior Member

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    We have a horse that used to have a rooting habit. I believe he started it because the previous owner hung in his mouth. She was only 12 and small, so when he rooted, he got slack in the reins by pulling her forward. We tried everything, but eventually let him punish himself with a harsher bit. It worked.:)
     
  6. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I have seen people do that and it works for them. However, it doesn't work for my sport as we want the horse to take the bit and take the rein out. So our option is to urge the horse forward. And within our system it works very well.
     
  7. emali06

    emali06 Senior Member

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    Thanks for the suggestions :)
     
  8. emali06

    emali06 Senior Member

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    I don’t ask for speed when he roots. He loves speed lol. I ask for forward and balance.

    I rode him in the correction bit to compare it to our last ride in a snaffle. The difference is as if I’m riding a different horse. I’m able to work on the right things instead of fight with his face. He’s not getting worked up and I’m not frustrated from having my fingers sawed off. We actually rode for a shorter time today because we were able to get things done correctly without repetition. I wasn’t having to pick on him constantly. At the end he seemed happier and much more relaxed. I was as well.
     
  9. Dream27

    Dream27 Senior Member

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    So why not just use the correction bit all the time and call it good? You can be just as soft in a correction bit as you can in a snaffle, in my opinion, especially if the horse likes it and works well in it. Frosty and I both love our correction bit (but I still do use a dogbone snaffle many days when we work on a lot of lateral drills and exercises).
     
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  10. emali06

    emali06 Senior Member

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    I don’t think it applies in this case. We worked very hard last year and he rooted until the very end. He was plenty strong and doing really well. He roots the most when we are standing still or walking.
     

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