Riding a bolting/hot horse in an open space

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by cavesson, Jan 6, 2019.

  1. cavesson

    cavesson Registered

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    I didn’t come to this expecting a full on solution, just to see if anyone else had this problem or had any tips to deal with it! I will consult my instructor of course once I’m back, I was mostly just hoping if anyone had some tips or was in a similar situation.
     
  2. Garfield70

    Garfield70 Senior Member

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    No, there is not a "do that and it stops" solution. You may be able to handle things like that with ease in a few years, if you keep practicing under the right instructor.
    It depends a bit on your temperament, honestly, because to ride horses like that you need to be unafraid of their antics. Either because you are by nature fearless even in objectively dangerous situations (there are kamikaze, thrill seeker riders like that who are not afraid whatever happens, but considering you opened this thread you are apparently not one of them) or you get so good ad riding jumpers that your technique and experience gives you the confidence and ability to handle this.
    Some riders will never be entirely comfortable dealing with this kind of thing.
     
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  3. cavesson

    cavesson Registered

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    I’ve never been a very confident rider, as I’ve never really had an instructor that knew my fears, they have all just thought since I can jump high it must mean I’m an amazing rider, as bad as it sounds. I’ve gone through quite a few and so far my current instructor is the best, but she also is very tough and thinks I can just deal it out. I do love speedy and fresh horses, and can handle a bolt every once in a while but once a horse is constantly fighting with me and trying to bolt/not listening, is when I lose my confidence entirely. You’re right though, im not sure I’d ever be so confident I can handle a horse like this with ease.
     
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  4. zomer

    zomer Senior Member

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    Good for you on being honest with yourself - that's really a wonderful quality to have in all aspects of life. Now I think you need to be honest with your trainer. I don't think it would be much fun to feel as you 'have' to push through when you are feeling afraid. And I think riding should be fun. Have a talk with her and see if she can work with you where you are, rather than where she thinks you should be. Good luck!
     
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  5. bobo and horses

    bobo and horses Senior Member

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    So, my best advice, ask for lessons on another horse, who is most likely better suited to you and your ability. Probably safer.
     
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  6. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    What does your instructor tell you to do?
     
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  7. bobo and horses

    bobo and horses Senior Member

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    Good question, SLC! Probably the most important one of all. Since this is not something new, per the poster, the instructor must have knowledge of this problem. If she cannot help you, you need someone who can and will.

    Before you sustain a serious injury, or the pony does.
     
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  8. bellalou

    bellalou Senior Member

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    It sounds like this horse should not be jumping if she does this with everyone. The horse sounds like she badly needs training from an experienced person who can get her truly solid on the flat before anyone even thinks of pointing her at a jump. Then when she is started on jumping, she needs someone who can ride her correctly and address issues as soon as they arise.

    A big problem with a lot of horses is that people jump them too much. They get hot and anticipatory but also sour on it. It leads to a lot of problems like you are having.

    I agree that you should ask to ride a different horse. This horse could erode your already fragile confidence - you need a horse to help you build your confidence instead.
     
  9. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Generally, the instructor tells the student to pull on both reins, or on one rein and circle the horse.

    The reason people don't do that is they don't have an independent seat and hands, so they can't keep their seat during a vigorous gallop, and they can't physically pull on one rein. Either that or they freeze in terror and can't do anything.

    Watched a REAL runaway at a show once. Big powerful Hannoverian with a big tall teenager on him. His head just got lower and lower and off he went into freight train mode.

    She certainly was physically capable of stopping him. But she just sat up there, frozen with terror.

    A local instructor went over and SCREAMED AND SCREAMED at her PULLEY REIN! PULLEY REIN! and she finally came out of her frozen terror, used the pulley rein, and the horse was gradually and safely stopped. It was like she was in a daze. It seemed like forever to get her to respond to the instructor.

    Some people 'don't want to pull on the rein.' It's better than getting killed, as an old instructor of mine would say.

    Many don't understand how to apply a pulley rein. Many don't have enough miles of cantering.

    Many don't ride with any contact, so they can't handle it when the horse takes the bit. And they can't feel when the horse is going to bolt.

    Some people pull on both reins as a knee-jerk, unthinking reaction, and that pulls them out of the saddle. Once they get their hands up in the air pulling both reins, they're going to come off.

    And other people just don't react quickly enough. They just have slow reactions. Time to stop it is when it first starts, the first step, while they still have their seat. Later, they're getting bounced around too vigorously to do anything independent with their hands.

    The bottom line is longe lessons with lots of exercises to get the rider stronger and more independent in her seat(circling the arms, lifting thighs off the saddle, riding without stirrups, cantering and cantering and cantering, canter to Moscow and back, at a big rolling working canter, not a slow lope, AND hand galloping), and in the ring lessons with horse control exercises. First rider in the line canters to the end of the line/group while the rest walk. Horse canters past walking horse. Transitions, transitions, transitions. Riding a hand gallop. Riding away from the gate, over and over and over, making upward transitions away from the gate and downward transitions toward the gate. Rinse, repeat.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2019
  10. Garfield70

    Garfield70 Senior Member

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    Totally WRONG.

    Firstly, NEVER EVER you pull on both reins when a horse bolts. In the initial phase of "getting faster" a few vigorous half halts can help, but on a horse that is out of control hauling on both reins is guaranteed to not help.

    People who can't hold a stable half seat or two point on a horse cantering fast and can not pull on one rein without being unbalanced shouldn't be jumping at all.

    The psychological freezing with loss of control is one thing, but these are technical basics, if they are not there, there is simply no basis to jump any horse, and particularly not cross country obstacles.

    Plus, again, what are beginners doing on a horse with known speed control problems?
     
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