Riding a bolting/hot horse in an open space

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by cavesson, Jan 6, 2019.

  1. cavesson

    cavesson Registered

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    In my riding school, I ride an amazing pony, Star. I love riding her in arenas or closed space, she’s an amazing jumper and even though she can be a bit fresh it’s nothing too much for me. The problem is when we go into open field, which we do basically everyday in the summer. Once we’re outside in open fields, jumping, she is extremely difficult for me to handle, and I get very nervous, which probably contributes to her misbehaving... Everytime I bring her out of line to start towards the jump, she tries to gallop off, not listen to anything I try get her to do, and will not walk. No matter how much I try slow her down or get her to listen she kind of just does her own thing (making me lose a lot of confidence) and then she speeds off towards a jump. I can handle speed, but I have no idea how to get her to listen to me and walk, turn, and be polite without constantly fighting her. I’d highly appreciate some help as I’m kind of lost on what to do (btw she is a schooling pony, so I cannot spend time lunging her or doing groundwork as much as I’d like to. She also is mostly outside in a pasture, apart from very bad weather)
     
  2. bobo and horses

    bobo and horses Senior Member

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    perhaps you should consult corgiequistrian, you seem to have almost identical problems. If this is a school pony, and you attend a riding school, don’t you therefore have regular lessons with an instructor? I think you would get much better hands on advice from someone who is actually there, instead of just reading on the net.

    Have you discussed your concerns with your instructor?
     
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  3. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Dont ride that horse. It knows you are afraid, you evidently make the horse uncomfortable enough that it wants you off and not on it's back over jumps. It will run off rather than carry you over a jump. That's the horse trying to keep himself sane.

    Keep taking lessons until you know you can ride well enough to make this horse comfortable with you before riding him again.
     
  4. Garfield70

    Garfield70 Senior Member

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    You should not ride that horse in this kind of situaiton. Somebody who feels safe on a bolter with enough experience to correct this behaviour should.
    And under no circumstances should a not very accomplished rider try to jump a horse with severe speed control issues.
    Probably one reason why this horse does it is because he isn't exposed to it enough. There are plenty of show dressage horses you rather wouldn't want to do any trail riding on. Why? Because they are by nature somehow freakish? No. Because from the beginning they were never exposed to it in a good way. Another reason could be bad experience with riders. A lot of horses that are on the more lively side are ruined by riders who are in their fear and need of control hanging in their faces. That turns a forward oriented horse into an uncontrollable mess.
     
  5. cavesson

    cavesson Registered

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    I do have regular lessons, and I have taken a break from riding over the holidays as I’m quite busy so I sadly haven’t had a chance to chat with my instructor, but I was of course planning to after I was back. I asked on this to get extra advice, or to see if someone with a similar problem answered :)
     
  6. cavesson

    cavesson Registered

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    She’s exposed to it nearly everyday, and she does do the same with the most experienced riders, they just know how to handle it haha. I was thinking of stopping riding her, although I do love it as she’s a great jumper, but I am not the most confident rider so it’s likely the best solution until I gain more confidence... I’m back riding in a week or two, I’ll see how I am outside with her in summer and if she in too much I think I’ll be forced to stop riding her, as sad as I’ll be.
     
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  7. NBChoice

    NBChoice Senior Member

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    I wouldn't ride her in that situation anymore.
     
  8. Garfield70

    Garfield70 Senior Member

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    No, the most experienced riders could train it out of the horse. Not waiting when facing an obstacle is just another bad habit that someone has allowed to get established. If you start greenies at free jumping, they are not running at the things like crazy. A horse that acts like a nut case when faced with obstacles is 100% manmade.
     
  9. BluemoonOKy

    BluemoonOKy Senior Member

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    No one can give you the ability or confidence to deal with a bolter on the internet. Better to pay an experienced instructor to see what is happening and guide you through it in real time. If you can't ride the bolt and get caught up in fear, you will not be able to deal with or handle it.
     
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  10. cavesson

    cavesson Registered

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    Hm, you’re probably right. She is the only horse in the school doing this, and my instructor is amazing at correcting me on what I do wrong and helping me, but she just sees this pony as another high spirited horse, so it’s very unlikely that anyone will train this out of her, as no one really sees this as a training issue, just an overly spirited pony.
     

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