Restitiching a saddle flap -

Discussion in 'Tack & Equipment' started by hayburnerheights, Jul 29, 2017.

  1. hayburnerheights

    hayburnerheights Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2009
    Messages:
    3,243
    Likes Received:
    1,629
    We have a saddle that needs to be restitched on the lower flaps (stirrup leathers rubbed off the stitching.. I am getting quotes. The one place said they would restitch on a machine (like the manufacturer did) but could hand stitch it at a higher cost.

    what is the general consensus?

    I know hand stitching should use the exact same holes but likely won't be as tight as a machine

    thoughts?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2010
    Messages:
    33,226
    Likes Received:
    64,679
    Machine stitching certainly can use the same holes. It is just a matter of adjusting the stitch length. Anyone who can use a leather stitching machine can acvomplish adjusting stitch length on that machine.
     
    mooselady and hayburnerheights like this.
  3. Rhythm 'n Blues

    Rhythm 'n Blues Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2007
    Messages:
    18,458
    Likes Received:
    14,432
    1st question: aside from aesthetics, is there a reason to restitch this? Many saddles have this & nothing more ever happens so it is left this way.

    2nd: it's a piece of cake to do. Anyone can do it.

    Yes there are holes there, but I guarantee you if done by hand an awl will be needed to make the hole back through all the leather. Small holes like those in those areas overtime do start to close back up.

    In my experience, most people who use a machine for those types of simple repairs don't set things up to go through the same holes. The time it takes to set that up is more than it takes to stitch the area.

    Hand stitched can be done tighter & one can use a locking stitch which is a stronger stitch than a machine would do. It is much more time consuming though & most charge a flat rate by the inch.
     
    mooselady likes this.
  4. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2010
    Messages:
    33,226
    Likes Received:
    64,679
    @Rhythm 'n Blues
    It takes NO TIME to adjust stitch length.

    If it did, every piece of leather ever sewn, no matter the thickness of the leather, would all have the same stitch length.

    Ever used a sewing machine? One minute flat to adjust stitch length.
     
  5. hayburnerheights

    hayburnerheights Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2009
    Messages:
    3,243
    Likes Received:
    1,629
    my daughters M tolouse saddle has this same bottom piece of leather and over time it opened up. Hers definitely needs to be fixed or the piece will rip off. The saddle in the photo is one I have on trial, I picked it up and noticed the stitching was gone and I wanted to know best practice to fix it) it may or may not open up in time but if your purchasing tack its best to know what you are getting into. The saddle in the photo is a Fairfax Monoflap dressage with wool flocking.
     

    Attached Files:

  6. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2010
    Messages:
    33,226
    Likes Received:
    64,679
    Ah, english saddles can also have the leather glued, then stitched, if the leather hasn't stretched too much, that is. Special glue so that the leather stays flexible.
     
    hayburnerheights likes this.
  7. Rhythm 'n Blues

    Rhythm 'n Blues Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2007
    Messages:
    18,458
    Likes Received:
    14,432
    Manes - I sew quite a bit, I'd dare to say a lot. There was zero need to patronize me.

    While you are correct it does take seconds to change a stitch length, but to decide the correct length - and then make perfectly sure every single stitch is in the old holes......people just don't do it. If you care that much - hand stitching will be the better option & also the stronger option.
     
    Sam C. and mooselady like this.
  8. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2010
    Messages:
    33,226
    Likes Received:
    64,679
    Not patronizing you at all. You said it was TOO DIFFICULT to adjust the machine for stitch length. Not true. That leads to the conclusion that you don't run a machine much.

    You simply accurately measure from center of hole to center of next hole, set your stitch length, do a test stitch on scrap, then stitch slowly.

    Just because you do not do it and prefer to go with by hand, that doesn't mean everyone else prefers to hand stitch. IMHO, the machine does a better job.
     
  9. Rhythm 'n Blues

    Rhythm 'n Blues Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2007
    Messages:
    18,458
    Likes Received:
    14,432
    A machine cannot offer a locking stitch. A really good leather worker will have stitching so tight/good you'd never know it was done by hand & youd thinknit was done by a machine.

    It's not just my preference - find me someone IRL who would take the time to do all that & wouldn't prefer to do it by hand.
     
    Sam C. likes this.
  10. Tack Collector

    Tack Collector Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2008
    Messages:
    6,005
    Likes Received:
    3,154
    Two needle method, by hand, and I'd do it myself just to save the money. You might even be able to pick up needles and black (or whatever that is) thread at JoAnn Fabric stores. Saddlers gently pound or hammer stitching to make it flat, particularly the knots. But wherever there are holes punched, it's pretty easy to stitch it by hand. My guess is the reasons it costs more is due to the actual time required by hand vs. just fire up the sewing machine. DIY is Just a bit tedious, though. I recommend some good music and a favorite legal beverage to make the job more interesting. >;-D
     

Share This Page