Respecting Your Personal Space

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by JVGoss, Jan 25, 2019.

?

How can I get my girl to stay out of my space when I lead her?

  1. training tips

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. Training advice

    1 vote(s)
    100.0%
  1. JVGoss

    JVGoss Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2019
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am new to Horse Forum, so forgive me if I am doing this all wrong.
     
  2. Lopinslow

    Lopinslow Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2008
    Messages:
    18,185
    Likes Received:
    22,598
    the answers you have above don't make any sense.

    if my horse invades my space, or gets pushy.. I back them up quickly.
     
    Dream27 likes this.
  3. slc

    slc Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    24,987
    Likes Received:
    15,392
    You probably don't have to create a poll with choices of 'training tips' and 'training advice.' But the first time you use the forum, it's kind of hard to see that there is any way to NOT create a poll, lol.

    How do you get your horse to stay out of your personal space? Well, that's very discipline specific(though most Western and NH folks will simply say they're doing it the only way anyone should do anything with a horse, and everyone else is wrong, lol).

    And you can see literally a bazillion free videos on youtube of people handling and training horses that way, showing how they start horses, and all that.

    In Western riding and Natural Horsemanship, that's a huge focus of training, to get the horse back and away from the person. "Teaching Personal Space" is a huge, huge part of Western and NH. There's a lot of use of round-pens and teaching the horse to move back away from the handler. There's lots of backing up and going out, away from the person.

    In sport horses and dressage and other disciplines, they way they have been traditionally done, the handling is different, the training is different, and the goal looks different.

    Instead of the horse walking behind us on a long lead or rope and not being allowed to get close to us or pass us(in NH, he'll be moved back or away with a shake of the rope, pressure from rope halter knots on his face, handler moving rapidly toward him, with a stick or whip if need be), in the non-NH disciplines, the horse works with his shoulder even with the handler's shoulder while being led. If he crowds the handler, the handler bends his neck so his head is toward the handler and his shoulder and hind quarters move away from the handler. If he runs ahead he finds himself circling, or if it gets really bad, being told to back up, but most of us desire to have as many corrections as possible 'on the forward', not from backing up or stopping.

    In NH round pens are used a lot to get the horse to move away from the trainer.

    There's no traditional use of round pens in the other disciplines. Race horse trainers may use an enclosure somewhat larger than a round pen when first breaking young race horses as they can be very strong at first and drag the person longeing them, but in general, the traditional English and Sport Horse (dressage, show jumping, eventing, etc) don't use a round pen(though some of us have recently adopted the use of a round pen from NH). Traditionally, we will longe the horse on a longe line, but we want the horse to respond to the longe line rather than having a fence turn him, so it's a problem if the horse is longed in a small pen because the pen turns him instead of the longe line.

    Obviously we don't want the horse stepping on our feet or knocking us down or dragging us, but we teach the horse to do that without making him back as far back away from us as NH and Western trainers do. It's not so completely different, except that the 'preferred distance' we teach the horse is closer and most of us don't shake ropes at them to get them to be in the right position. And yet, my young horse doesn't drag me, knock into me or step on me, but he works much closer to me than an NH horse does. He is taught that he's only allowed to touch me very gently. I simply corrected him when he messed up, and he learned how to do this, and learned the signal for going away from me, which we use in longeing.

    SO....the answer to your question is that you have several somewhat different choices as to how you want to teach your horse not to run over you or step on you. Most Americans are really into NH right now, you will see a zillian trainers and videos demonstrating that, and it's very popular right now.
     
    Sarah J likes this.
  4. Dream27

    Dream27 Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2010
    Messages:
    3,016
    Likes Received:
    2,629
    As someone who shows showmanship and (western...although discipline really doesn't matter in this scenario), I absolutely do NOT want my horse lollygagging behind me, as the "western and NH people do". I want her throatlatch even with my shoulder, which I feel is pretty standard across the board for horse handling. When I stop, I want her to stop. When I walk, she needs to walk, and same thing for trotting. If I stop and the horse keeps going, I'll stop and back her up a couple steps. Basically, the way I am around any horse...if it takes a step into your bubble (eg you're just standing and chatting with a friend while holding your horse), you just immediately push it back one step so it's back to where it was before. No punishment, just immediate reaction to make them step back. I don't really think it needs to be made more complicated...if the horse goes into your space without asking, you push them back out (one step or however many they took to get into your space) to their original starting position.
     
    Sarah J and Lopinslow like this.
  5. slc

    slc Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    24,987
    Likes Received:
    15,392
    Some examples of NH trainers(everyone has their favorite and most think everyone else sucks!!)

    Most online videos are samples. To get the whole lesson, you have to buy DVDs or pay to attend a clinic.







     
  6. bobo and horses

    bobo and horses Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2007
    Messages:
    3,566
    Likes Received:
    5,112
    Western horses are taught by most to walk on the right side head about even with the shoulder. Neither lagging behind nor pulling ahead.

    When standing, they are taught to stay put, where they were told, not crowding the handler, nor moving away.

    If they do lag, pull away, invade your space, we put them back where they belong, Either by backing them out of our space, bring them back up to the shoulder area.

    The rope shaking stuff is for the birds, if you get my drift. I personally have never seen anyone use that method. Only in videos
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2019
    Alsosusieq2 and Dream27 like this.
  7. Lopinslow

    Lopinslow Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2008
    Messages:
    18,185
    Likes Received:
    22,598
    @slc , good horse handling is just basic common sense.... you make everything into huge deal.
    if a horse gets in my space, I put them back OUT of my space.

    and none of the horse people I know, don't follow any of those NH people. again, they just use basic, common sense
     
    Alsosusieq2, NaeNae and Dream27 like this.
  8. JVGoss

    JVGoss Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2019
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have no idea what I am doing on Horse Forum. I don’t know what they want me to put in the answer, why would I answer my own question???? But thanks for your answer lol
     
  9. mooselady

    mooselady Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2012
    Messages:
    13,887
    Likes Received:
    39,398
    I vote with the majority, it IS that simple, have consistency, set your personal space and do not let them encroach on it. If they come in back them off, doesn’t matter what discipline or how you like to lead, setthe rule, and keep enforcing it.
     
    Dream27 likes this.
  10. Rhythm 'n Blues

    Rhythm 'n Blues Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2007
    Messages:
    20,191
    Likes Received:
    17,619
    while everyone is correct, it's the timing of when you catch them that is most important. If you wait until they have taken 10steps are are on top of you, then you've missed basically the entire thing. you want to correct the behaviour THE MOMENT is starts to occur, so as soon as the start to shift their weight in the direction of coming towards you - catch them before their feet move. If you catch them in the moment of time, then you will need way less of an aid, and you'll have a greater effect.

    It's not different than the really little kid stealing cookies - you can discipline them after they have eaten the cookies, but they are definitely still going to try it again. But if you catch them as they are heading for the cookie jar, then you have a far greater chance of being successful - meaning them not eating the cookies, and they might not try it again....especially if you repeatedly keep catching them before they make it to the cookie jar. ;)
     
    equinitis, Binca, NBChoice and 3 others like this.

Share This Page