Renting Barn and Pasture

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by Arem, Aug 6, 2018.

  1. CabterCrazy

    CabterCrazy Senior Member

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    @Bakkir ontario also has insane hydro prices and board prices are usually high there. Prices for Canada vs the States are not comparable

    I think this will be a good fit for Arem, she is looking into it with her eyes open. From the sounds of it she isnt wanting to change everything about the place, she just wants it safe and practical for her horse.

    I pay 157 for outdoor board, I am at an amazing barn and unless I own my own property wouldnt move them. But from the sounds of it you need a change, this would be a good step.
     
    Arem likes this.
  2. ChestersMomma

    ChestersMomma Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Oh one more thing I just thought of is for you personally to consider the cost of your labor. I listened to a talk about this once and it made a lot of sense. For argument's sake (ok... because I'm bad at math), say you make 10/hr. If the two of you agree on lease price of $200/month... you need to ADD the cost of the effort you are going to put into this "base price" that you will owe them. Say twice daily visits of 1 hr for feeding/mucking/watering (14 hours) once monthly getting hay delivery (2 hours), etc etc. Just those two things have raised your "cost" by 58hrs per month or $580. Now, of course, you already spend time at the barn anyway for pleasure so you can probably chop that in half, but YOUR labor hours should be figured into your decision vs the reward of total control. :)
     
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  3. Arem

    Arem Senior Member

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    See, that doesn’t really matter to me. I mucked stalls for $3 a stall at the barn I currently board at over the winter “just because.” Crappy pay, but I enjoy the work and it doesn’t take me long. (At the barn I worked at, I’d have the entire 10 stall barn mucked, spotlessly swept, and the outside sidewalk swept in an hour, leaving me the whole day to finish the other barns and everything else).

    Since I’m quite fit and strong, the “work” is actually nice, relaxing downtime. So I don’t feel the need to figure out “pay” for myself. Especially since that’s just imaginary, conceptual money anyway.

    If the opportunity to purchase my own horse property came up, I would probably do that and keep them at home. Same work. It’s just my property instead of someone else’s. But land prices have skyrocketed locally. Housing developments and apartment complexes are popping up everywhere.

    I like the idea of full board, but in practice it’s just stressing me out. At least, for the moment. Maybe I find a place that is actually enjoyable to full board at, but maybe I go this route. Right now I’m just kicking the tires and figuring out what’s next either way.
     
  4. Circle C

    Circle C Senior Member

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    Yes... this... I always get liability insurance along with my theft/mortality insurance. If you're horse isn't insured, I would do that.
     
    doublelranch and Arem like this.
  5. foxtrot

    foxtrot Senior Member

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    I don't have any real input here since I've never done anything like this, buuuut I just wanted to say...

    As someone who has always had horses on my own property...

    Why are multiple people acting like caring for your own horses is this insurmountable hardship and you will go crazy if you don't board? When I was 12 years old I became the sole caretaker for 6 horses. Now I have a bunch of health problems and have chronic pain but am the sole caretaker for 3 minis, who I figure come out to about 1 real horse in terms of weight/feed/work.

    Like... it's not hard? It's not rocket science? Mucking a stall or taking a wheelbarrow around a paddock and cleaning it or carrying water buckets or filling hay nets--none of those things are the most difficult thing imaginable. But then I'd rather be taking care of horses than doing housework. :D

    If I get sick and am physically unable to do it, I have a friend or family member do it. Even if I have to pay someone. There's always a way. No different from any other responsibility in life.

    I hope it turns out well for you Arem and that you post lots of pics of the property. (y)
     
  6. NaeNae

    NaeNae Senior Member

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    As someone who has always taken care of my own, and other people's, horses, I can say that no, it's not this huge task.

    BUT there IS a difference between having the horses at home and having to drive to them every day or multiple times a day.

    I can tell you, there are days where I just want to get home from work and I've had a mentally and physically exhausting day and I want to sit and not move a minute. But I either have to go straight to the barn instead, or, go home for a while and then STILL get out to the barn. I do it, I love horses, but it can be way nicer when you can get home from work, relax for an hour or so, and then walk out your back door to do chores instead of having to get back in the car and drive, even the 8 minutes, to the barn.

    Just another perspective.
     
  7. Arem

    Arem Senior Member

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    I don’t go home. I just go to the next place to do the next thing.:rolleyes::ROFLMAO: Because if I go home I’ll loose all motivation. :p

    I was window shopping horse properties for sale the other day. Things I can’t afford. :rofl: One of them had a barn with 9 stalls. Nine! That shoulds like a challenge.:D

    A gal can dream, anyway.
     
    GONE ROPING, JStorry, ginster and 2 others like this.
  8. doublelranch

    doublelranch Senior Member

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    When I was a kid, I was the sole caretaker for my horse which my dad would not allow on the property. Not only did I have to care for him daily even if I had the flu, wisdom teeth cut out, or even mono, but I had to walk a mile there and back in rain and snow. I had to keep the saddle at home, so I had to ride him to the house and back to the pasture bareback. I guess it just taught me that if I wanted something bad enough, it was worth going through a little crap. I guess I am one of the ones that scratch my head when people say they don't feel like/have time to go to the barn and muck and feed. They just want to ride when they feel like it. I taught my daughter that the riding is just the bonus. Feeding, mucking, putting up hay and training are all a part of the responsibility. Just like all of my other farm animals, they take time and work.
     
  9. NaeNae

    NaeNae Senior Member

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    I rode my bike 20 minutes there and back for the first two years of owning my horse before I got a drivers license. I know how to put in the hard work, and I know what animals entail.

    Doesn't mean I'm not allowed to have a long day and wish that I could just go home instead of also needing to go do barn chores.

    No one is immune to feeling tired and wanting a day off. And that doesn't make them a bad person or not fit to own animals.
     
  10. Arem

    Arem Senior Member

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    I agree with everyone. So there. :rofl:
     

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