Renting Barn and Pasture

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by Arem, Aug 6, 2018.

  1. Arem

    Arem Senior Member

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    I’m hoping, in the not terribly distant future, to get a second young horse to bring along. I already know that, most likely, I’m not going to continue boarding where I am now. Second horse or no, once I’m settled into my new career and house/apartment, I’ll move Brandi. I love the grounds where I board now. Not terribly thrilled with the rest. Especially not for trying to train up a young horse.

    Anyway....

    A couple at my church bought a house and property last year that came with a little barn and pasture. They like horses, and would love to see horses in their pasture, but don’t really want to commit to ownership themselves. Super nice people. I like them a lot.

    We started talking yesterday about the possibility of me renting the barn and pasture for my horse(s). We’re looking into costs, logistics, and so on.

    More than likely I’d purchase grain and hay myself. Probably, it would be self-care with them feeding and such when I’m out of town. Or possibly the other way around. We have to discuss that.

    The barn area is separated off from the rest of the pole barn and has two 12X15 (dirt floors that need re-leveled with mats laid down), cement aisle, nice little tack/feed room, and a little tie stall (or hay storage area?) across from the tack room. The stalls have auto waterers. The paddock is not large, is wooded, and doesn’t have grass. The fence needs repair. It does have a little shelter in it. The couple talked about possibly expanding the paddock. More than likely, I’d only stall in poor weather.

    They’re fairly enthusiastic and willing to do work (within reason, of course) to get it in shape. I’m intrigued by the possibility of being totally in control of what my horse(s) eat and having a space that is “mine.” I’d be giving up the large fields that I’m used to riding in, but there is still adequate space on the property and in the area to ride. And I’ll be planning on getting my own trailer so I can trailer to arenas and parks for more riding if I wish.

    If we can make it work, I want it to be a win/win for all of us. What are some things we/I should consider? What would you expect to pay as rent for the barn and paddock? (Providing all of your own feed?) How do I figure out fair compensation for any extra work feeding or cleaning they might do? Etc etc
     
  2. doublelranch

    doublelranch Senior Member

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    I only have one very noteworthy thing. I let my daughter take a horse off property while she was doing clinicals away from home. She had a similar situation available. The people that lived there adored him....and hand fed him everything under the sun they could find to offer him without asking. They knew absolutely zilch about horses except they were pretty. He became pushy, obnoxious, hyper and overweight. I would politely discuss feeding arrangements and risks to their health in detail. Even cover lawn mower clippings.

    It sounds like a wonderful opportunity for you as long as you won't miss fellow horsemen/women to ride with. Having a trailer will make it easier though.
     
  3. Bakkir

    Bakkir Senior Member

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    Well my thought is you will have all the costs of owning your own place without anyone to share those costs. And what happens if it doesnt work out?

    Be prepared to pay for hydro and water and fixing stuff like fences, plus rent and hay and feed and bedding and manure removal.

    You will need all the farm equipment as well. Wheel barrows to tractors.

    And you will need to be there at least 2 times per day.

    It could easily be double what you pay in a boarding barn.
     
  4. Arem

    Arem Senior Member

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    Tractor won’t be necessary. I’d plan on going over expectations as far as fencing, water, and whatnot.

    I’d also plan on having a contract laid out.
     
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  5. Bakkir

    Bakkir Senior Member

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    Best thing to do is make a business plan. That way you are aware of the real costs going in.

    Non horse people won't be able to help you and they won't know what it's like to actually live on a working farm. Its loud at times, messy and smelly and poop is everywhere.
     
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  6. jojozwiebel

    jojozwiebel Full Member

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    Manure removal and pest control. Are they going to be ok with you coming over at odd hours? Vet emergencies? Trailer parking? If the fence breaks, who pays for it?
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2018
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  7. Jim_in_PA

    Jim_in_PA Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    It could be a nice arrangement...but in addition to "the schooling of the non-horsie people on the facts of life", make sure you have an agreement in writing. :) (But you knew that already... ;) )
     
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  8. doublelranch

    doublelranch Senior Member

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    I think my horses smell like roses compared to my hogs and the neighbors cows.:whistle: Now eau de mare in heat is rather stinky, but still not as bad as hogs.

    Arem, you have probably thought of extra costs and responsibilities. It is more work, but to me, it's more satisfying and less worry to be in full control of your horses' care. Some people don't have the time, but it is really what keeps me going in my older age. If it turns out to not be what you were hoping for, you can always go back to boarding.
     
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  9. CabterCrazy

    CabterCrazy Senior Member

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    Also stipulate who is allowed near your horses or to ride them, just so it doesnt turn into free rides for whoever asks or a free for all in the field to give treats and touch
     
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  10. Arem

    Arem Senior Member

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    Yep! That’s why I made a thread here so I could start putting that together. Fortunately, they are animal people and not total strangers to horses. They’re also sensible and doing their own research on their end, too. Then we’ll get together and see if we can work it out favorably for all.

    We actually already did talk about that a little bit already, and I plan on outlining that clearly before I’d actually move any horses there. (y)
     
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