Remedies for Chronic Thrush that really work!

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by Omayra, Jan 2, 2019.

  1. Omayra

    Omayra Full Member

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    Yes my Shire loves doing the same thing, he is not stalled but has a run in and it seems as he gets too lazy to step out and used the bathroom some place else like they normally do ‍♀️
     
  2. MzCarol

    MzCarol Senior Member

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    Last year we had an ongoing thrush issue that never fully resolved no matter what we used. The horses have a nice dry shed and high dry spots outside but they are all mud lovers.

    This year........we started brushing their well trimmed and cleaned out hooves with venice turpentine. After a thorough picking we brush it on and then pack the feet with sawdust to form a moisture barrier. If we have a problem its very minor and resolves quickly. We are very happy with how this routine is working.
     
  3. CarlisleChipper

    CarlisleChipper Senior Member+

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    Thrush is a fungal infection so putting antibiotics on it doesn't make sense to me. It needs an antifungal. Also, in humans we consider chronic metabolic issues to be contributing factors in recurrent fungal infections. Try getting some 2 or 3% gentian violet. Maybe use a blow dryer on the bottom of his hooves.
     
  4. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    This is not correct. Thrush in horses is a bacterial infection. Putting antibiotics on it does make sense. Older books say it's fungal.

    from The Lowdown on Thrush – The Horse

    For years, thrush was thought to be a fungal disease, but we now know that the thrush we find in horses’ hooves is bacterial. In fact, we know that it’s an anaerobic bacteria (bacteria that is most suited for living in an environment without oxygen), Fusobacterium necrophorum, which is present in animal feces and most soil samples.
     
  5. CarlisleChipper

    CarlisleChipper Senior Member+

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    Thrush Buster's main ingredient is gentian violet which is used specifically for fungal infections and has very weak antibacterial properties. I seriously question the results that "thrush" is bacterial. If I was still a lab tech I would have loved to work up a thrush sample of a horse and stick it under a microscope to see the elements.
     
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  6. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Good lord, girl. You're too young to be a stick in the mud, lol.

    Fusobacterium is a BACTERIA, not a fungus. Gentian violet works on bacterial, fungal and parasitic cells.

    In the following experiment they 'worked up a thrush sample of a horse' just as you said you wanted to do as a lab tech. They were looking at which bacteria were involved in thrush infections in horse's feet. It's already well-established that it's a bacteria.

    Fusobacterium necrophorum, and not Dichelobacter nodosus, is associated with equine hoof thrush. - PubMed - NCBI

    t F. necrophorum, and not D. nodosus, is associated with equine hoof thrush. Hoof thrush in horses is thus caused by F. necrophorum in the absence D. nodosus. This is different from footrot in sheep, goats, cattle and pigs, which is caused by the synergistic action of F. necrophorum and D. nodosus.

    http://www.idpublications.com/journals/PDFs/ANAE/ANAE_MostCited_2.pdf

    Gentian Violet: A 19th Century Drug Re-Emerges in the 21st Century

    "Recent discoveries have found novel targets of GV, namely NADPH oxidase in mammalian cells and thioredoxin reductase 2 in bacterial, fungal, and parasitic cells. These discoveries have expanded the use of GV in the 21st century. Given that GV is well tolerated, effective and inexpensive, its use in dermatology is predicted to increase."

    Gentian Violet was used in very old medicines. Here is some of the history of GV.

    https://www.derm.theclinics.com/article/S0733-8635(10)00134-8/pdf

    The biggest excitement about GV is it has activity against MRSA, methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus infections. That's ALSO A BACTERIA.

    There's no indication that people get it from horses, but F. necrophorum can cause very serious disease in humans(I'm guessing that the people must be somehow immunocompromised):

    Fusobacterium necrophorum is a Gram-negative anaerobic bacillus that can be a primary pathogen causing either localised abscesses and throat infections or systemic life-threatening disease. Systemic infections due to F. necrophorum are referred to as either Lemierre’s disease/syndrome, post-anginal sepsis or necrobacillosis, but in the context of this mini-review, all are included under the umbrella term of ‘invasive F. necrophorum disease’ (IFND). Although IFND has been well documented for over a century, it is quite a rare condition and modern-day clinicians of various medical disciplines are frequently unaware of this organism and the severity of symptoms that it can cause. IFND classically occurs in previously healthy young people although the factors that trigger the invasive process are not fully understood. There are countless descriptive case histories and small series of cases of IFND disease in the literature and although commonly referred to as a ‘forgotten’ disease, in truth, it is probably best described as a repeatedly ‘discovered’ disease, as it may not always be included in medical curricula, and neither is it mentioned in some major medical textbooks. There is some evidence that IFND may be on the increase, particularly in the UK. The potential reasons for this are considered in this review along with an historical overview, and updates on disease incidence, patient demography, pathogenesis and laboratory diagnosis.

    And from the pdf above:

    "This result builds on the work of Brockow and colleagues15 who previously demonstrated the efficacy of GV alone in clearing S aureus from colonized lesions of atopic eczema. A 0.3% solution of GV was applied twice daily to lesional and nonlesional skin for 4 days and, compared with topical steroids and tar preparations, was the only agent to immediately reduce bacterial density at both sites (P<.001). GV not only helped clearing bacterial presence but also significantly reduced eczema severity."
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2019
  7. CarlisleChipper

    CarlisleChipper Senior Member+

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    Yes I am well-aware that MRSA is a bacteria, good God woman.

    This doesn't sit right with me but whatever :rofl:
    According to Merck Veterinary Manual the bacterial infection is secondary anyways.

    I encourage my mom's to stay away from gentian violet when treating thrush since it is a carcinogen and coal tar.
     
  8. Rachel1786

    Rachel1786 Senior Member

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    I'm a huge fan of "no thrush" powder, I've always found it to work well.
     
  9. CarlisleChipper

    CarlisleChipper Senior Member+

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    Also, That is a sample of 16 horses, not very big. They also used PCR but it could also be replicated in other ways such as cultures on agar which could then be worked up to identify specific organisms. Also looking under a microscope is very telling. I really don't like verbiage that represents fungal infections now being broadened to include bacteria as well. I think it's because it's very conflicting with my profession. :rofl:
     
  10. slc

    slc Senior Member

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