Question

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by HorsesPonies44, Dec 16, 2017.

  1. HorsesPonies44

    HorsesPonies44 Registered

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    Hi! I'm new here and I've had A LOT of experience with horses. I'm going to buy a 2 year old filly soon but she's a kiger mountain mustang Quarter horse mix. I've heard mustangs can be difficult to train. Is this true?
     
  2. palogal

    palogal Senior Member

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    All breeds have their "thing". Mustangs tend to be a little more stubborn. If he's a cross (mix is a term for a dog, not a horse btw) with a QH out of a domesticated mare and has been handled appropriately, I wouldn't think he'd be any different than any other 2 year old.
     
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  3. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Horses are horses. Doesn't matter what breed they are, some train easy, some are more challenging. The fact the horse is part Mustang has little to do with anything.
     
  4. GotaDunQH

    GotaDunQH Senior Member

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    Agree with this....don't treat this youngster ANY different than any other horse.
     
  5. bellalou

    bellalou Senior Member

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    Hon, no offense but you're 13. It's simply not possible to have "A LOT" of experience with anything at that age. I don't mean that as a put-down - just a fact. Even if you've been riding since you were 2, you can't even think about doing any training until you're at least in your tweens and riding is a whole different ball game from training.

    Horse is a horse. Make sure you have experienced people working with you. Don't be so confident in your own ability that you can't ask questions or admit you need help. I'm 56, been riding since I was 8. I still need help and I'm not too proud to ask for it.
     
  6. GotaDunQH

    GotaDunQH Senior Member

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    Agree!!! I'm 61 and have been riding/showing since I was 5....and I STILL use the help of a professional. Riding is one thing....TRAINING is a WHOLE other ball of wax, and just because someone knows how to ride, doesn't mean they have the ability and knowledge to train. Bellalou...I'm sure you feel the same as I do. After all the years, there are days when I still feel like I'm "paying my dues" when it comes to riding and maintaining the training on the horses we have.
     
  7. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    When the 1987 winner of the World Dressage Championships sits down to get interviewed after her absolutely brilliant and amazing ride, and says, 'I wasn't really sure what aids to apply and wished my trainer was here', to learn about that....to hear about Joseph Neckermann, who, when he was forced to stop riding due to serious health problems in his seventies, say regretfully, "But I have so much yet to learn" after spending forty years on top of the world, beating every one else in the world in top flight competition....it should be a lesson. Even the best in the world take riding lessons, even after decades and decades of experience.
     
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  8. palogal

    palogal Senior Member

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    I agree. I'm a trainer and I have a trainer (2 actually). "If your trainer doesn't have a trainer, you need a new trainer. " ----no idea who said this but it's the truth.
     
  9. SilverBelle

    SilverBelle Senior Member

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    Amen. One of my FIRST questions when I am 'interviewing' a potential trainer to see if we'd be a good fit is to ask who they train under. The more I get into the field of dressage, I can tell you I've YET to talk to a trainer and have them inform me they don't have a trainer.
     
  10. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I did once! In many, many years in dressage - once only. I asked who does she take lessons with. Her manager minion informed me she doesn't TAKE lessons, she GIVES lessons.

    LOL. I was sitting there thinking, OH REALLY. The World Dressage Champions of the last 40 years all take lessons. Frequently.

    I've had trainers tell me unfortunately they can't afford to take lessons currently, or that they can't get away from their business and go take some lessons, hopefully when they have a working student to hold the fort down they can drive to so and so's place, or 'the only way I can swing that is if I have my trainer put on a clinic here, and I get a couple dozen riders signed up for the clinic'....and like that.

    But I've only heard ONE dressage person in 40 years, actually BRAG that she didn't take lessons, LOL.

    Dressage, more than any other type of riding, is an 'instructor led activity.' It's just too easy to miss one's own mistakes otherwise.
     
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