PSSM1 and 2

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by Arem, May 23, 2018.

  1. Arem

    Arem Senior Member

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    With all of the talk about PSSM 1 and 2 everywhere lately, I’ve been seeing looots of symptoms here and there. And now I’m starting to wonder if Brandi is a candidate. Crud.

    (And there might go my breeding plans. If she is positive, I won’t. )

    I will likely be sending off hairs for a test sooner rather than later. Thought I’d make a thread to get feedback on the possibity of it.

    I have blamed most of her issues on the condition her feet were in for so many years. Things out of balance can cause damage. Being super particular about her feet seems to solve a lot of it, but last year and this have been tough. It could be age. But maybe not.

    Anywho, from an article on PSSM1:
    She checks the cinchy, bucking at the canter, hard to get on a certain lead, and trouble standing for the farrier boxes.

    Her lead that she has trouble with is her club foot side so arguably it could be related to her hoof troubles there. Her bucking at the canter mostly resolves with regular work, which would seem opposite PSSM *but* the regular/consistent work started happening at the same time as a diet change from sweet feed to a ration balancer. (High NSC to lower NSC). She is stiff going to the right. Difficult to flex. I can get her to bend on a small circle but not a large one. I had her better for a while, but we’re having quite a bit of trouble again. She doesn’t like to spin or rollback left, but will happily spin and rollback right.

    She’s had on and off subtle ?lameness? (Not sure. Can’t isolate) in her hind end that no one can agree on and my vet doesn’t see it/isn’t concerned.

    She tugs, tugs, tugs her feet while I or anyone works on them. No matter what I do. She used to be worse about standing for a farrier. With the old crappy farrier years ago, I used a chain. I’ve at least gotten her to where I can do her feet with her ground tied. But she tugs tugs tugs. Sore on hard ground in spite of having very hard, tough, correct feet.

    Cinchy has long been an issue. It’s lessened over the years with better fitting saddles and rope cinches. (She hates anything that doesn’t have a little give). She mostly doesn’t openly react to cinching anymore, but I can still tell she doesn’t like it. It’s just not bad enough for her to ear pin or anything major.

    So, any of you who know anything about PSSM, does anything seem suspect? Is there anything else about her, relevant to PSSM?

    She’s currently eating Tribute Special K and grass hay.

    @Serenity06 @LoveTrail
     
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  2. Arem

    Arem Senior Member

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    Topline is an issue with Brandi, though muscle in general is not.
     
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  3. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    How old is she again? Seems many present just before turning ten.

    That's probably not relevant though as this has been ongoing for awhile.
     
  4. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    Edited that Arem. Age probably isn't relevant as she's not suddenly presenting.

    Just bite the bullet and find out. As much as you are worried, can you imagine the relief to find out she's not?
     
  5. Arem

    Arem Senior Member

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    When she was on sweet feed:

    (The date on the last one isn’t correct, I don’t think. The others are.)

    No sweet feed/almost no sweet feed (I think my BO might have added some on occasion and there were times I couldn’t get/find her feed so she ate was at the barn)

    And recently, on only Tribute Special K and grass hay. (Or grass alfalfa mix)
    DFCBAF0E-896B-4371-8C6C-40231CB48146.jpeg 88522B19-335D-4D89-A2DA-7C1FE6525092.png
     
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  6. Arem

    Arem Senior Member

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    Well, When I first started riding her she was 9 and turned 10 shortly after. She had a history of bucking at the canter before then. She required lunging before riding. I started having lameness issues with her in either 2013 or 2014, so she was either 12 or 13. She’s 17 now.

    I’m not sure if it would be more a relief to find her negative or positive. On one hand, positive means I have an answer to the grey hairs she causes and potential treatments to help her. But negative means that breeding is back on the table— provided that I can reach some certainty that I won’t deal with the same issues in an offspring. (Meaning that her issues are just leftover issues from her foremerly bad feet, age, and... I dunno, ulcers or something)
     
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  7. palimino57

    palimino57 Senior Member

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    I have a PSSM mare, and I wouldnt wish it on anyone. I took her as she got me back riding, but its constantly a worry and she started tying up last year, so we are on a sliding slope to the end sadly.
     
  8. Arem

    Arem Senior Member

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    Awww. Poor thing. I’m sorry. :(
     
  9. Arem

    Arem Senior Member

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    Looking into testing now. The PSSM2 testing is going to have to wait until it’s peer reviewed and widedly available. I’m not paying $249 for a test that hasn’t been peer reviewed yet. That’s just craziness.

    PSSM1 test can happen sooner.

    Still interested in opinions on if it sounds like a possibility or not.
     
  10. PyroTekNik333

    PyroTekNik333 Senior Member

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    My understanding is that pssm1 responds well to a specific diet and consistent exercise so her getting better with more work could definitely be a symptom.

    I'm leary of the 'everything is pssm' bandwagon though.
    I do have a mare that I highly suspect has a variant, like you I'm holding off on testing just yet except for pssm1 which was neg.
    But in reading through the facebook group I saw an awful lot of photos that make me worry pssm is becoming the new catchall for anything and everything a horse does that is undesirable.
     

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