Prospective purchase with stifle issue...

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by RedBranchRun, Feb 5, 2019.

  1. Rhythm 'n Blues

    Rhythm 'n Blues Senior Member

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    I have a feeling the seller of the horse didn’t go through with a full diagnosis.....meaning they didn’t want an US or radiographs. That is why there isn’t a real diagnosis. It is that, or they did the work up, for a diagnosis and it’s in their best interest to just leave that part out.

    So I would ask the seller directly if she had any work up done to her a real diagnosis. If she says no, then i would not purchase the horse without that being done. PPE’s are to find issues, then one must decide if they feel the issue is large enough to warrant continuing to find the cause/diagnosis. If the “issue” is big enough (like 3/5 on flexion test) Id just walk away. Since the seller KNOWS there’s a problem, if they aren’t willing to get a diagnosis, then I’d walk away......that is very very fishy to me. Make me think they know more than they are letting on. If they would like to pay for the work up, and it turns out to be nothing too big, and you still like the horse, then you can barter on price.

    Those are my thoughts. No point buying something, you’ve been told has an issue without a diagnosis. That’s like buying something you know needs an undetermined amount of money thrown at it before even starting........and doing so without knowing you’ll have anything salvageable at the end.....
     
  2. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Your first red flag is: If the horse is so great, winning, and this causes no issue, then why is the horse up for sale?

    There are plenty of excuses the owner could give, but people rarely sell a horse with a “no problem“ issue, if it REALLY IS “no problem.“
     
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  3. JStorry

    JStorry Senior Member

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    My old broodmare had stifle surgery before I bought her. She was ok for a couple years and got worse and worse. Near the end I had her on monthly Legend injections and daily previcox. I'm really good at IV shots now.

    We had 4 years together. 4 years that I wouldn't trade for anything. If I could go back knowing what I know now I would still buy her. She was worth it.

    I'll never knowingly buy a horse with any type of lameness again. I won't go through that again. I'm particularly gunshy on stifles now. I'm probably overreacting but I feel there are enough sound horses out there. I don't need the emotional agony of lameness on a horse again. I know the ones I have now could be injured in the blink of an eye. But I won't buy another one with an issue.

    In your case I would advise a full vet work up. Don't go in blind
     
  4. turnnburnlynx

    turnnburnlynx Senior Member

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    People sell horses to make room for newer and younger prospects. Every trainer does this, so someone selling a been there done that is totally normal.

    OP- what are your thoughts on what you're going to do?
     
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  5. LoveTrail

    LoveTrail Senior Member

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    These are horse that actually are hitching, not just slightly off in symmetry or taking a bad step every once in awhile.

    What I see with these horses. You see it better when the horse goes to the right.

    [video]
     
  6. palogal

    palogal Senior Member

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    I see what you're saying. Also looks like a conformation issue, but this is far more severe of an impact on movement.
     
  7. secuono

    secuono Senior Member

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    Very limited experience here, and may not relate to OP's horse in question, but I'll add my two pennies...

    My youngest gelding has issues with his left stifle. If he is on grain, of any sort, it will resurface after a few weeks(3-5wks) and bother him. As little as 1 cup a day is enough to trigger this negative reaction. His leg will go back to normal after 5~ weeks w/o grain, just hay/pasture.
    RBs also caused leg issues for him.

    Again, this may be a different version of a stifle issue, but wanted to put it out there in case it is actually similar in the end.

    Good luck, OP!
    I'm a softy, I'd probably risk it and cry in a corner over it if it did, in fact, end up a huge issue...hah.
     
  8. FluffyThoroughbred

    FluffyThoroughbred Full Member

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    Maybe look at another horse. It depends on your eventual goals. If it’s serious, and you’re doubtful, don’t be afraid to look at another horse.
     
  9. palogal

    palogal Senior Member

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    Lots of reasons. Kid went off to college, showing got expensive, somebody lost interest....
     
  10. LoveTrail

    LoveTrail Senior Member

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    Yeah, my horse it is the right hind that reacts to the wrong food and ulcers. It is the one he has a split meniscus from most likely when he was four before I bought him so he will never be 100% symmetrical, but can get close now.

    My friend is getting a great deal on one because the youth quit showing a year ago and the horse has been sitting because the parents didn't want to pay for it to go to shows to get sold. And the trainer is in the middle of nowhere in IL, closest airport is St. Louis, MO, two hours away and is not a BNT in AQHA. She is just waiting on the pre purchase that was done today.
     

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