Potential Arthritis

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by timmythenarwhal, Oct 10, 2018.

  1. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Yeah that's 100% reliable every minute with every horse, including this horse, though she never even mentioned the horse being trained that way. And horses never get injured or aggravate injuries doing that because they always listen 100% every second to 'voice commands' when turned loose in a ring after a period of time with less than their usual amount of exercise, and fed a working diet with a full amount of concentrates, the entire time they're laid up. And all riding arenas have perfect footing, so loose horses never slip or rick their backs when tearing around.

    And I have some ocean front property in Iowa to sell you, LOL.

    It's bad advice, ginster. Plain and simple. You're not familiar with this sort of problem, and you simply gave her bad advice.

    There is no mention by the OP of having this problem properly worked up/evaluated. It sounds like someone walked by and said, 'maybe it's arthritis.' The horse needs a proper evaluation and a real treatment plan.

    At this point I don't see any information from the OP that indicates she has a real diagnosis or treatment plan. Therefore the same annoying advice as usual: get the horse to a decent vet, get a real diagnosis, get a real treatment plan. Two weeks off with robaxin or bute is not a real treatment plan. As noted, lots of vets do not take back injuries seriously enough. These problems are generally chronic and longstanding before they are noticed.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2018
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  2. HayleyS

    HayleyS Senior Member

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    I didn't see it mentioned anywhere, but how old was your horse when you started riding him, and how long has he been in the work schedule you described?
     
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  3. ginster

    ginster Senior Member

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    Horse is on turnout. The risk of her aggravating an in twistin twisting her back is there already.
    Is there any reason why you think the arena is more dangerous for a horse than turnout?

    Also- you could have worded that differently but you just had to be condescending, didn't you?
     
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  4. Baboo

    Baboo Senior Member

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    Any thoughts of kissing spines? I remember reading something recently (have to try to narrow that down) that suggests it is more common than previously thought, and can be implicated in back pain specifically in horses less than 5 years old. I don't know much about the problem personally, having fortunately never experienced it with one of my horses, but I do know a couple of people who have had varying degrees of disability with TBs so afflicted.
     
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  5. GotaDunQH

    GotaDunQH Senior Member

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    Ya, my two don't run around like idiots....funny that!! They follow the walls as if I was riding them.
     
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  6. ginster

    ginster Senior Member

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    Seems like a more likely cause than arthritis to me...
    I would have that horse x-rayed to make sure. Hopefully the OP has a clinic somewhere near..
     
  7. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Kissing spine IS arthritis.
     
  8. LoveTrail

    LoveTrail Senior Member

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    So that grain is really not good for horses. Your horse sounds to be having the same issues my horse had with it last year. Granted he is older, but he was really affected movement wise with that grain because it is a high starch high corn based grain. I thought he had arthritis in his hocks when I tried to stretch them found them so stiff. He also atrophied from it last year. This was a progress from good to bad to better last year when he went from not on that grain to on that grain to off of that grain.

    FoxyProgression.jpg

    And this is how it affected his movement. Also gave him hind gut ulcers and amongst other things. Taken the week before the next video.

    [video]

    Then just two days off of the corn.

    [video]

    And then him earlier this year. He's 16.

    [video]
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2018
  9. mymarespet

    mymarespet Senior Member+

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    Love Trail, those pics of before and after are quite dramatic, how long had he been on the corn product before you took him off? The horse in the middle seriously looks like a different horse. Curious, the feed was the same brand/product?
     
  10. mymarespet

    mymarespet Senior Member+

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    I agree with Doc, the saddle could be responsible for this problem. The saddle may have fit ok, especially at first, but as the work increased, both frequency and intensity the fit becomes more important, think of a shoe that fits poorly. You can deal with wearing the shoe once a week, but if you had to wear it on a 2 mile hike over rough ground every day it quickly becomes problematic.
    The other thing that happens is a horses back changes shape as fitness improves and as the horse continues to grow/mature. Quite a bit of change happens between 2/3, 3/4, even without being ridden. (I am sure you know this and am not criticizing) not many people can afford to get a different saddle every few months for their changing youngster.
    If this were me I would have a chiro out, massage done, quite likely more than once, vet give thorough exam, possibly xrays if within budget. I would also try to have someone other than regular farrier look at the feet. Sometimes even a good farrier can miss or make a mistake.
    If the horse appears comfortable hand walking that is where I would start. Cut back on the processed feed. We love to show our love by feeding as best we possibly can but seriously most horses are overfed. Even tho the bag says feed this much the horse doesn't need it. (IMO) Feed more of last years hay so horse has something to chew most of the day. (ulcers would also be on my list to check) Ulcers are responsible for a lot of lameness and behavior problems.
    Re-evaluate in two weeks.
    You are being pro-active by doing your own research, there is a lot of experienced people on this board. I know it is slow going but time spent finding the problem and getting back under saddle slowly will give you a longer lasting horse. :)
    Sometimes, if you have a really stoic horse, they learn some bad habits such as bracing because they put up with the discomfort/pain for too long, (again not criticism just what a good horse does) so it can be really tough to separate habit from still having pain. Good luck
     

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