Post links to instructional videos on detecting lameness!

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by slc, Aug 1, 2018.

  1. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    This is a series of 4 videos made by a lameness vet.

    These are fantastic. Take notes if the hind leg lameness in the other video was not clear to you.



    (these were hijacked by dressage hub, looking for the original link)

    Dr. Kaneps video - excellent -



    Dr. Schell:



    U Ga Vet Med:



    explains how 'hip hike' is seen in hind leg lameness instead of bobbing head in many cases:



    On the above video, note how QUICK the hip hike is on the lame side, and the movement of the hip up and down on the sound side is much smoother, more gradual, and not as sudden, AND not as much. The above video has excellent explanation.
     
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  2. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    There they are. I've got to check these out, probably very helpful.
     
  3. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Here is a good article:

    https://equusmagazine.com/lameness/improve-eye-lameness-30825

    from the article:

    SIGNS OF HIND-LIMB LAMENESS

    Identifying hind-limb lameness is a little trickier. Watch the horse jog away from you, focusing on the topline of his rump. With each stride, there will be motion in that line. Look at the total motion on each side---it should appear to be equal. If one side has more total motion than the other, we tend to suspect lameness in that limb. Some people refer to “hip hike,” but it’s not a matter of height, it’s more the total amount of movement.
    One thing that can help in the detection of hind-limb lameness is athletic tape. When working with students, I put two six-inch strips of tape on the horse’s rump, about four inches off of the midline over his croup. These “racing stripes” give the eye something to focus on as the horse trots away.
    In the hind limbs, the telltale motion isn’t related to weight bearing. During the “swing phase” of the lame leg, the sound leg is bearing more weight and therefore the horse is dropping lower on the sound side. In response, the lame leg has to swing even lower, causing that hip to appear to drop. Then during the stance phase of the lame leg, the horse is reluctant to bear full weight, resulting in an elevation of that hip (you may see this as a “hip hike” but not always). You may also notice that the lame leg will move more quickly during this swing phase to play catch-up.
    When looking at the horse from the side you’ll see the painful hind leg come off the ground more quickly than the sound limb. There will also be less “fetlock drop” (fetlock extension) in the lame limb because it is bearing less weight. If the horse is moving in a circle---on a longe line, for example---you can watch for fetlock drop, stride length and asymmetry in weight bearing. Keep in mind, however, that the inside leg has a shorter stance phase to begin with.
     
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