Post Colic, help.

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by ElviraH, Jan 10, 2019.

  1. ElviraH

    ElviraH Registered

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    Hello, this is my second try at posting here, I hope it doesn’t eat this too...


    I do apologise for skipping the introduction forums but this is of such an urgent nature I’m sure you will understand.

    I don’t tend to use forums so I’m hoping that the trolls here will be at a minimum, as I really do need some genuine advice but usually find the trolls outweigh the pros of these things..


    So my horse is a Mini Appy who was recently diagnosed with Cushings at age 9.

    He coliced on the 28th of December (we still don’t know why but he doesn’t drink a lot in winter time so gets his food like soup).

    This was a very severe impactation and our only guess is the haylage or hay has had some issue with it. We have discarded the last 15 bales of hay from that batch and also the haylage.

    He showed signs of neurological issues especially at night when he appeared blind (he doesn’t see well at night anyway ( due to his appy blood) but this was worse). He literally walked for 10minutes in circles and stood for 5 on and off the whole night. He would just keep walking until he came up against a barrier then stop for a while. I had to untangle him from brambles and he almost slid under the gate and fence several times.

    On the 28th my vet came out and administered buscopan and painkillers and we adopted a wait and see approach, I spent the night at the field with him.

    No change and no poop. The following morning vet came out again and. Administered the same drugs, he was concerned about the horses behaviour but suggested we wait and see again as during the daylight on that morning he could see a little better, he did see a little inflammation behind his eyes but no trauma or actual infections etc.

    He came out a 3rd time that day and after that we ended up rushing him over to the surgery.

    He was tubed, put on IV for fluids, painkillers and antibiotics. For approx 6-7days at the surgery. He eventually passed the impactation and started to nibble at food.

    Both the vet and I were(are) cautious still as neither of us thought he would make it.

    He is currently on omeprazole for ulcers and does have mouth ulcers as well.

    He (miracle, thanks to God) came home this week. He will not do more than take a few bites of food at a time. It’s clear he wants to eat but it’s uncomfortable for him with his mouth. I’m concerned he will not get enough fluids or food going through his system and we will end up back at square one.. he is due for his dental this month but of course he’s too ill to have it..

    Any suggestions would be very much appreciated, he’s currently getting hi fibre cubes with water and soft meadow hay (which he’s barely eating) he has had a couple of BMs but not as many as he should be due to not eating.

    I need to find a way to get more fluid and food into him. He literally takes a couple of bites and a little more with encouragement and then walks away.

    He’s not used to getting sweet feed so doesn’t seem keen on the molassed water I’ve offered him. Should I keep trying?

    He has seemed bright (but extremely tired which is to be expected) but I’m extremely concerned about this whole thing.

    I’m currently going 4x a day to encourage him to eat, he has got a small paddock attached to his bare one for grass in the hopes that would tempt him, and 20-30minutes a couple of times a day out in the main field.

    Thank you in advance.
     
  2. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    It's really one for the vet. I didn't see how long it's been since he came back from the vet. It does say he was at the vet's for 6-7 days and it doesn't sound like he got any surgery.

    In general, horses need to rest their digestive system for a little while after a severe impaction colic. But it's up to the vet when that becomes a problem rather than just something he needs to do.

    About the circling and bumping into things and getting stuck, while that might be neurological, it's not unusual to see horses with a lot of abdominal pain do that. Impactions can be very painful.

    You might want to cut that brush down if he wanders into it.

    Is there a shelter where he is? Is it cold where you are? Cold causes a lot of horses to move about less and drink less. Offering warm water frequently and taking them for walks or longeing them briefly each day can help prevent impactions. Blanketing can help to keep horses more active too, if it is cold. When they're comfortable and warm they move around more.
     
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  3. ElviraH

    ElviraH Registered

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    Thank you for your reply, he has been back 4 days, he was at the vets about 10 days I think. My vet wanted to be sure he was stable enough to come home. Everything is a bit of a blur right now.

    The brush I always left as it’s part of the hedge/fence and he likes to eat the blackberries off it in the autumn but I will look into cutting it away and putting some post and rail in.

    He does have a big field shelter which he can go in and out of as he pleases, I know he doesn’t drink as well in the winter so always feed ‘soup’. He gets hi fibre cubes and copra just a minimal amount, and as much hay as he wants.
    It’s been a very mild winter here and there really hasn’t even been any frost.
    When my vet looked at the impactation content he suggested straw, but I don’t use straw, so the only thing fitting that description was the haylage or hay, I had noticed the haylage was pretty coarse.

    This morning he didn’t look great but I followed him about until he had eaten a handful of cubes, copra and a little molasses made up in warm water.
    I then let him out onto grass which he actually started to eat today for the first time. So I left him out there for an hour. For the first time since the 27th of Dec he raced up the field and did a huge poop! He was absolutely shattered when I brought him in and I spoke with my vet who thinks there is hope he will pull through this now.
     
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  4. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Hope he will continue to improve.

     
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  5. bellalou

    bellalou Senior Member

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    That must be so stressful for you. No suggestions but I’m glad it’s starting to look better and hope he recovers fully.
     
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  6. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Do not feed haylage. It is fermented hay, it's for cows, not horses. He has ulcers and his tummy hurts when food is in it. Nibbling and stopping is a red flag for ulcers. Treat that aggressively.

    Wet his hay. Feed NO sweet feed. Give soaked whole oats. Soak them over night in water, rinse, then feed. 1C makes almost two cups of finished product, so soak 1/2 C for a mini.

    Now, since he has toxins in him from the haylage, call this woman at myfineequine.com. Google it and call the number.

    Talk to her about this horse's issue. She has an all natural product called KLNZ (cleanse) it is made from things horses eat in nature; raspberry leaves, and other naturally growing herbs and plants that horses eat for health. Buy it and feed as directed.

    I used this for my horse who was rattlesnake bit to cleanse his body of toxins. It helps clean the kidney and liver. This will help immensely.
     
  7. ElviraH

    ElviraH Registered

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    Hi and thank you for the suggestions.
    Maybe it’s a different thing there, silage is fermented and what we feed to cows, it’s not suitable for horses. Haylage here is made especially for horses to eat..? Not sure if that’s what you are referring to? We don’t know for sure exactly what caused the impactation the haylage and hay are only guesses. He only usually gets a small handful of haylage anyway, it’s mostly for the Irish cob. And I went out and purchased soft meadow hay for him when he came home. He refuses to eat wet hay at any point whether he’s sick or not. If I fill his basket with hay and it rains he refuses to eat it. If it’s raining his hay must go inside his field shelter, (doesn’t he have me well trained lol)

    Yes he absolutely has ulcers in his tummy and in his mouth, my vet already started him on a 5 week intensive course of omeprazole, he’s getting enough for a 250kg pony to be on the safe side. He’s been on the course for 7 days now and the ones in his mouth seem to be settling down a bit. It is these mostly why we think he’s reluctant to eat as he will come for a bucket of food, just doesn’t like eating much.

    That’s a great idea, some cleansing herbs could be just the thing, we have a different herb supplier here for horses and there is a herbalist close to where I work that keeps some animal remedies. Thank you! I will absolutely be doing that. I’m sure they will have milk thistle at the very least.

    I’m also going to try soaked oats. That’s very helpful I appreciate it!
     
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  8. BluemoonOKy

    BluemoonOKy Senior Member

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    Check out Eleanor kellon dvm ecir group ...she has a website and Facebook groups. Will help with Cushings and what to eat
     
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  9. palogal

    palogal Senior Member

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    yikes. That sounds like a hot mess. I had a client one time that swore by peppermint Tums. She would routinely give them to her horse for his ulcers and she swore to the hills it worked. I can't testify to it myself but desperate times...
     
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  10. jojozwiebel

    jojozwiebel Senior Member+

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    What are the mouth ulcers from? My horse had mouth ulcers from foxtail in his hay. We fed soaked pellets, put in salve, and switched his hay. He is all better now.

    How is he weight wise? And if he is cold, I second a blanket.
     
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