Popular trees????

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by Apryle & Rayne, Apr 2, 2005.

  1. Apryle & Rayne

    Apryle & Rayne Senior Member

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    Do some of you cut down and put popular trees in your pastures? the horses eat the bark and it kills worm and parasites. anyone else heard of doin this?
     
  2. indiekisses985

    indiekisses985 Senior Member+

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    We put up a fence that hugs around the trees real tight. They don't ever bite on it.
     
  3. Top Dun

    Top Dun Senior Member+

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    Poplar and Cottonwood trees have historically been used by Native americans as an additional source of feed in the winter months. Poplar trees, aspens and cottonwoods are all from the same genus of trees (populus) and different species, But they are all OK for a horse to eat. But it does NOT kill worms in the horses gut. IF you are feeding the poplar instead of deworming your horses, then it won't be working.

    http://www.lewisandclark200.gov/edu/sample_cw.cfm
    The cottonwood tree was important to Lewis and Clark in several ways: as a source of shade and indicator of water, as construction material for Fort Mandan, as firewood, as food for starving animals (bark), as the preferred log for building dugout canoes, and as crude wheels for carts that made the Great Falls portage a little easier.
     
    Apryle & Rayne and CowGirlUp1833 like this.
  4. Apryle & Rayne

    Apryle & Rayne Senior Member

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    topdun- We ofcoarse deworm our horses regularly but popular is known to kill worms in moose and deer too......why wouldn't it work on horses?
     
  5. Top Dun

    Top Dun Senior Member+

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    Different animals carry different worms and the chemicals that work on one species of animals does not work on ALL animals. Because the different worms have different chemical resistances.
     
  6. HappyJoy

    HappyJoy Senior Member+

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    i never realized how much horses liked poplar (i don't think it's popular lol, although they are popular with horses ;) ) until several of ours came down in a really bad ice storm. that was a month or two ago, and even though they get lots of food, the horses stripped the trees as soon as they could, they loved the stuff.
     
  7. Apryle & Rayne

    Apryle & Rayne Senior Member

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    topdun- I find u give great info but I just have a few more questions....We found that our horses would eat more popular bark when worms and parasites were at their peak.... also we had a horse in a separate pasture(same grass and enviroment) w/ the same deworming as the other horses but he didn't have any popular and one day we found long white worms in his poop(I no that that is a bad sign of deworming neglect)
     
  8. tazz001

    tazz001 Senior Member

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    Well that will explain why the couple of poplars in the pasture have been chewed! Looks like beaver have been at them :)
     
  9. Celeste

    Celeste Senior Member+

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    there are plants that wild horses eat that kill worms though. i saw a documentary where this stallion was so full of worms he would have died in a couple months, but they came backa few months later, and not only was he still alive, but he was almost completely free of worms.
     
  10. Top Dun

    Top Dun Senior Member+

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    Individual horses can also have different Resistances to different parasites. Ages in one reason for the differences in resistance.
    What were the ages of the horses in the poplar pasture and what was the age of the horse in the non-poplar pasture? What was the reason that the other horse was in a different pasture? Did that Other pasture also have other horses or was grazed earlier by other horse? Enviromental conditions in different pastures can also cause some horses to pick up more worms then horses in a different pasture. then thereae encysted worms that may have come out in the ONE horse ONLY that were NOT earlier killed by the dewormer. Really there are several possiblilites that can't jsut be explained by the eatting of the poplar alone.
     

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