Pony has sore hind feet

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by RedHeadMare, Aug 12, 2017.

  1. RedHeadMare

    RedHeadMare Full Member

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    Can horses get laminitis in both hind feet without the front hooves being sore?
    Small Shetland pony is suddenly sore this morning.
    There is no heat, no racing pulse and no swelling, but pony is reluctant to walk on gravel and keeps shifting her weight from one hind to the other. She is barefoot and chubby but has been losing weight steadily with less feed and more exercise.
     
  2. Bakkir

    Bakkir Senior Member

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    Since it's both hinds are you sure it's her feet and not her hips? Look for heat and swelling up higher.
     
  3. RedHeadMare

    RedHeadMare Full Member

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    Yes I'm sure it is not up higher. She moves normally in the sand arena but is sore on gravel.
     
  4. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    An overweight pony is definitely at risk for laminitis, even if she's been losing weight. But....It would be unusual for a horse to get laminitis in its hind feet, and it would be even more unusual for a horse to only get laminitis in its hind feet.

    Because her only known symptoms are that she is shifting her hind feet and reluctant to walk on gravel, I'd suggest doing a couple things:

    1. Take her temperature
    2. Take her pulse
    3. Take her respiration
    4. Check the color of gums - should be a rather pale pink. See if there are any small bruise-like marks on her gums or mucous membranes
    5. Call the vet

    Soreness behind and reluctance to move could mean so many different things, some of them quite dangerous, so I'd suggest you call your vet and tell him/her how the pony's behaving, and provide the temperature, pulse and respiration, and ask the vet what s/he thinks should be done.

    There are a number of possibilities -
    • Laminitis in all four feet, but for some reason she's not showing much of any symptoms in the front feet
    • Laminitis in only the hind feet, which is unusual but not impossible
    • Fat embolism from losing weight, but would be really unexpected except when weight loss is far more rapid than you describe
    • Pain due to tying up (exertional rhabdomyolysis), which seems unlikely
    • Pain due to a infection or contagious disease (why temp would be helpful)
    • Pain due to an injury to one or both hind legs(pretty much anywhere on the hind leg, really, could cause what you described), for example, from kicking over a fence rail, getting in a fight, or getting a hind foot caught in the halter (not at all unusual)
    • She's about to give birth :) and other more unlikely possibilities
    Because she's an overweight Shetland, Laminitis, even if it doesn't show the typical set of symptoms, is a big concern.
     
  5. Bakkir

    Bakkir Senior Member

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    I agree call the vet. I don't think it's laminitis either.
     
  6. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Call the Vet. It could be a number of things, all of which waiting isn't going to help.
     
  7. RedHeadMare

    RedHeadMare Full Member

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    I just came back from the barn. Pony is moving better but still not right. She walks fine on sand so I'm hoping it is just the gravel making her sore.

    She is eating, drinking and pooping normally.

    I will reassess tomorrow morning and call the vet if she is not better. Please send your healing thoughts her way.
     
  8. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I hope the delay in diagnosis and treatment does not have a negative effect on her outcome. When the condition the animal is suffering from is unknown, there is always that chance.
     
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  9. palogal

    palogal Senior Member

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    Maybe she has an abscess in one and is trying to stand comfortably. Or a stone bruise or something. Did she have her feet trimmed recently? If she's not completely better pretty soon call your vet or if you're sure it's her feet, call the farrier to put a hoof tester on her.

    It also could be that she was fooling around outside and fell.
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2017
  10. LoveTrail

    LoveTrail Senior Member

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    You don't want to put off a vet coming out if it is laminitis. My friend did that, it started on Saturday and she waited until the vet was coming out on Wednesday for another client at the barn, and her horse may not recover. He really hasn't improved from his and it has been five months so far. He has abscessed at least three times and one time it was bleeding.
     
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