Photosensitivity

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by tlwidener, Jun 11, 2018.

  1. tlwidener

    tlwidener Senior Member

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    I've got a mare who had a photosensitive reaction last year. She ended up with some scabby irritated spots on her white markings. We had some blood tests done, and she showed increased liver enzymes. She's since healed up and is healthy.

    I am wondering what her risk is going forward. Is this likely something that will be a problem with her? I think what caused it last year was her grazing some weeds during a photo session. She was in a dry lot last summer and gorged herself on anything green whenever she got the chance. I'm thinking the likeliest culprit was kochia.

    So... my new place is full of kochia. I sprayed the pastures and paddocks yesterday and am going to have a fair kill, but is this something I need to worry about? Is this likely a freak thing or a genetic thing? I also have her dam and half sister (who is 2.5 months old.)

    I am planning to turn the three of them out on the paddock.
     
  2. gaitedboomer

    gaitedboomer Senior Member

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    Was your area in some level of drought status last year and might still be this year?

    The only time, one of my horses had a phyto sensitive reaction to pig weed was the year our area was in exceptional drought status. He didn't eat the pig weed but his nose rubbed against it when he went after the grass close to it. The jaw dropping part was this was NOT my horse with environmental allergies, it was one of the horses that was never bothered by anything.

    I'm going to hazard a guess and say that most likely, last year's affected horse stands a good chance of a repeat if you keep them in a dry lot and they stick their noses near and/or eat some of those weeds.

    Whether or not all three horses are related, doesn't matter, its their immune systems that will dictate whether or not they have an allergic reaction:)
     
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  3. xXScribbleXx

    xXScribbleXx Senior Member

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    I have had 1 horse with photosensitivity among other immune issues. I bumped up my horses immune system with Omega Alpha "immune plus" aswell as camelina oil. I also limited turnout, and covered him up with a flysheet, boots, and full face mask. His reoccurred. But he did have some foals before he was gelded, and I own a granddaughter of his, and none of them suffer like he did. Mine was triggered by alsike clover, and something in our dirt in the area...his displayed like a really bad case of scratches that went up to his hocks.
     
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  4. tlwidener

    tlwidener Senior Member

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    So... there is a theory that immune system support will ward this off?
     
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  5. gaitedboomer

    gaitedboomer Senior Member

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    Well ----- yes ---- lollollol

    BUT THIS horse may not be helped by a certain treatment, whereas THAT horse will.

    Diet is the first place to start many folks would be surprised to know that grains and soy can cause allergy type issues. People want to pooh-pooh that notion but I have one horse that is living proof and I know there are one or two more on this forum.
     
  6. tlwidener

    tlwidener Senior Member

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    I think her diet is fairly good, but she does get some soy.

    She's on alfalfa, Nutrena Empower Topline, Renew Gold, vitamin E, and a magnesium supplement. Loose salt in a bucket.

    I did spray the paddock with 4 lb Amine 2,4D. I got a pretty good kill. What was out there was mostly kochia and some bindweed.

    I'm not 100% sure what weed caused the issue last year. My educated guess is pigweed or kochia.

    Right now she is either in a stall or dry lot. I'd like her to turn her out in the paddock during the day... more just to give her room than to graze. I'll continue to feed her alfalfa.
     
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  7. xXScribbleXx

    xXScribbleXx Senior Member

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    I changed ALOT of things around the same time. I stopped putting his immune system at risk (he was an older fella) so I retired him from showing, stopped hock injections, limited turnout to only ideal days (not too hot, not to cold, dry, dirt paddock with shade). I do personally believe it does have some issues with immunity. I have had 5 different horses on the property, and only he seemed affected, all the rest were young, barely off the farm, healthy animals, while he was showing, had arthritis and ringbone so he was being joint injected every 6 months, older. My old youth horse. He was just being introduced to more strenuous things (immune wise) than the rest, and they all ate the same hay which is where the alsike clover likely was.

    As the other poster mentioned..diet. I switched to a quality tested hay. No more soy. I try to feed nothing soy. I get my proteins and some of my oils via hemp products (which are AMAZING), and camelina oil. Mixed with beet pulp or soaked alfalfa pellets and a loose mineral designed for my area. I add oats if the horse needs it. And I would do an immune support supplement for my sensitive guy. Once I stopped putting his immune system at risk, and followed a strict protocol it never happened again. Believe its been 5 years with no photosensitivity attacks, where before it was yearly attacks..his would send him to ICU at a vet clinic for a week.
     
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