Pain of unknown origin

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by SEAmom, Jul 26, 2018.

  1. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I think hunting around and looking at several different videos (there are a great many, some are better than these) helps. I disagree with you that not having resources or having imperfect videos makes it impossible to learn this.

    Because people don't like to spread it around that their horse is lame, there is always going to be a little bit of deception ('he's not lame he's just...he's...the sun is in his eyes!'). We can sift through that.

    The more you think you can't do something, the more you can't do it.
     
  2. barrel_racer64

    barrel_racer64 Senior Member

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    I'm not talking about learning, I'm talking about diagnosing the suspected lameness. Like in Rn'B's situation with Fez, several vets/lameness specialists missed what she suspected. That is what I was specifically talking about. My suspicions on my dad's horse probably wont ever be validated simply because he isn't obviously off. I called the lameness on my BIL's horse that turned out to be a career ending injury. Had he listened to her, it may have only been a set back since he said she took a weird step and felt a little "off" but he kept roping on her anyway. I hope like heck I am wrong about my dad's horse since he is the only finished horse on the place and BIL is planning to take him to the Vegas World Series team roping in December.

    You don't have to have "resources", just watch any horse you see anywhere: at a show, in a pasture (just saw a pony yesterday that was very obviously lame I'd say 7/8 or 8/8) or anywhere else.
     
  3. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Well, it's too bad that a vet missed that Fez was lame, I have had that happen to me as well, so have most people. We have to keep advocating for the horse and R&B did a very good job of advocating for her horse.

    I would urge ANYONE who suspects their horse is persistently lame and can't demonstrate that to the vet after working the horse and moving him on a variety of surfaces, etc, have his horse tested with the Lameness Locator.

    Another option is to video the horse when YOU think he is lame and send those videos to the vet!

    Another is to work the horse MORE and get him sorer. Most lamenesses will worsen when the horse is worked more. It's the lesser of two evils - the greater evil being no treatment or diagnosis.

    Some people DO see lameness when it isn't actually there, too. My friend was SURE her horse was lame - he was not. No one could see it but her. Her eye was just - off. it happens. In her case, she didn't want to have her eye re-educated...lol. So she took the horse from one vet to another. Yeah, she was rich, lol.

    Longeing a crooked horse can make it look lame, 'rein lameness' happens, or the horse may only be lame for a short time due to a temporary soreness.


    Note that when my horse was lamer, that vet was able to see the lameness. And in fact, I thought my horse didn't look lame at all when the vet was there!

    Generally that happens when the lameness is subtle.

    The owner sees the horse at the very worst times of day - when the horse is just getting up after lying down, early in the morning, or after a workout (when it's a type of lameness that is worse after work).

    When the vet arrives the horse tenses up and this can conceal lameness too. The vet (or trainer) may make the horse move with more energy - that can also hide lameness.

    Or they may examine the horse and have him jog on a hard (or softer) surface, which can also conceal lameness.

    The key is when you can't demonstrate the lameness to where the vet can see it, you keep on digging - work horse harder, try different surfaces, size of circle, send videos when horse is lame, try Lameness Locator.

    Also, try to move quickly. All causes of lameness are less likely to permanently disable a horse when treated early, specifically and thoroughly.

     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2018
  4. LoveTrail

    LoveTrail Senior Member

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    Number 7 could be farrier caused lameness. Had that happened once where my horse was shod uneven. Vet came out saw the foot wasn't even had my ex farrier redo that foot and he was sound again.
     
  5. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Well, that's what I'm here to teach ya...among other things.

    Only I'm not spending 45 minutes and 27 paragraphs in three posts to explain it because that is far from necessary~!!
    Just look where I said to look. Break down your observations to one leg, one section of the body at a time, and the issues will reveal themselves to you.
     
    mymarespet, ginster and Alsosusieq2 like this.
  6. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I posted a bunch of videos for you to look at, they have very simple basic instructions on seeing hind leg lameness and the videos are fantastic.
     
  7. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    Hmm..I'd swear I just saw your post, then can't find it. Grr. I'll check later, thanks SLC, that was very kind.
     
  8. StraightandTrue

    StraightandTrue Senior Member

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    Highly recommend this series. It’s a great overview of the many ways lameness can present, and it’s not always as obvious as head bobbing. They also go into diagnostics which shows just how tricky it can be to pinpoint the root of a lameness issue.
     
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  9. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I offered to take the horse to the vet.
     
  10. ginster

    ginster Senior Member

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    WHERE have I said that *I* don´t want to learn? I am always open to learning more.
    That doesn´t negate what I said: a lot, if not most people do not see less obvious lameness in a horse or their own horses.
    Whether *they* spend the time to learn more isn´t up to me.
    Given just my own experience in the beginning of my riding "career" I would sign off on the 50 % of horses being lame. That hopefully cannot be generalized but the barns I rode at, looking back - yeah, most of the horses who were labeled difficult or stubborn were in discomfort of not outright pain.
    I recognize the way some of them moved in lots of videos I have seen since.
     
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