Opinions on this loan situation.

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by NathanAndrews, Aug 9, 2017.

  1. Garfield70

    Garfield70 Senior Member

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    11 years old girl is too young for this kind of arrangement.
     
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  2. Compadre

    Compadre Senior Member

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    @Garfield70 Yes, if the PARENTS aren't mature enough to discipline their own daughter, and instead take her side over that of an adult. That's the real problem here.
     
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  3. D_BaldStockings

    D_BaldStockings Senior Member

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    What manes said.

    And if you are 'in the middle' and support the horse's owner, you can expect flack from the parents.

    How you handle that is up to you.
     
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  4. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    She was every bit entitled to sever the contract. I wouldn't put myself in the middle as the parents are obviously enabling this child. Nope. At least I wouldn't.
     
  5. DancingArabian

    DancingArabian Senior Member

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    I think the owner shouldn't have ever leased to this child in the first place, but she made the right call in calling it quits.
     
  6. Compadre

    Compadre Senior Member

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    I would consider it like this. If you are paying for a house, you may owe money to the bank for it, but as long as you are making the monthly payment, it is YOUR house. If this person is basically leasing to own your horse, then IMO you should use that as a good reason to say "nope, she's paying the payment, so it is entirely up to her, not me."
     
  7. NathanAndrews

    NathanAndrews Full Member

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    For the ones saying the child is too young, the child was never alone. She always had her parents with her. And they are "horsey". Kids have to start somewhere in the world of owning and that's part loaning.
     
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  8. ginster

    ginster Senior Member

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    Well, if the parents were always there they should have made sure the girl was keeping up with her responsibilities...
    Seems like they┬┤re just as immature and entitled as their daughter.
    Good riddance imo.
     
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  9. D_BaldStockings

    D_BaldStockings Senior Member

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    If the child was never alone; why didn't they know she wasn't doing her jobs?
    Why didn't manager hand the manure fork to them if child didn't clean the stall?

    Were they horsey in the sense of owning and handing off to grooms or horsey in a do it yourself manner?

    Sounds like we have entitled parents in addition to the child. Steer clear.
     
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  10. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I'd start out with an abundance of skepticism and caution about anything I was told about the situation from either side.

    If I was the owner, I'd prove things to myself by witnessing them first hand, rather than believing anything anyone 'thought they saw'. I've seen many times how people at the barn are a fatal combination of 'pot stirrer' and 'really mean well.'

    As an example I would sometimes sit on the horses in the pasture, which was allowed (that was long ago). A 'helpful' boarder who was rather territorial ('this barn is mine mine mine') and always gave newbies a hard time, reported that I was riding up the road by the pasture, which was not allowed. From roughly an eighth of a mile away (standing outside a second barn up the road - both barns part of the same facility), she could not tell if I was riding in the pasture or not. But she told the owner I was riding on the road. And I was thrown out.

    So be careful that you are dealing with facts. Confirm them, and realize that things can get repeated and distorted by 'barn gossip'. No, I'm not saying this is all just 'barn gossip.' I'm saying it needs to be standard operating procedure to confirm that it isn't. Otherwise if some of it is exaggeration, the leaser can always argue, challenge what she's being accused of, wriggle out of things.

    How easily can things get blown out of proportion and any new kid at the barn made into a Mata Hari? Very, very easily. No matter what I heard, I'd confirm it myself. I'd be sure who ever reported this girl's sins was reliable, and I'd still want to see it for myself. And I would note down times and dates, and give the parents a list of when the infractions occurred if they are so angry that the child lost the lease.

    Too often the owner of the horse leaves the kid almost immediately to her own devices, and spends too little time getting to know the person and how responsible or irresponsible she may be. The owner needs to be working with the leaser for several weeks and this helps to impress upon the leaser how important certain things are, and to establish a routine.

    Personally, I think the first mistake was made by the horse owner, who left far, far too much for the girl to do. You're far better off having a WRITTEN contract with each responsibility spelled out, and having the leaser pay, rather than work off, the lease.

    The written contract stipulates a 90 probation in which the owner can end the arrangement FOR ANY REASON, including conduct toward farm owner, staff or other boarders, violating the terms of the lease, farm rules, allowing anyone else to ride the horse, or any other reason not included in the lease. That needs to be made clear to the parents as well as the child.

    No one should ever have any unfamiliar person who they haven't worked with A LOT before, take over care of their horse as part of a lease.

    The number of times these arrangements fail with the leaser 'not doing her job', I'd say that about 90+% of leases like that fail. Get it in writing, have them pay for it, and go over the agreement multiple times WITH THE PARENTS AND THE GIRL PRESENT.


     

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