Nexium Treatment

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by CarlisleChipper, Jan 15, 2019.

  1. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Once again: evaluation at a standstill DOES NOT reveal all cases of back soreness. I said that before. People here said that was <bad word, b word>. It's not. It's not at all. Many back problems do not result in 'tight muscles' at a standstill that a chiro or vet or masseuse can feel. Further, many back problems aren't back problems at all, they're hock problems, or stifle problems. Those are hard to diagnose at a standstill, especially if they're mild or intermittent.

    This is true of many problems, in fact. Breathing problems, for example, are very different with the horse in motion and tacked up. Soundness is very different at a standstill, vs a walk, vs a trot.

    Okay. Here's another view of how to make changes.

    First, with a trainer and vet's input if needed, pick ONE THING to change. The most likely thing to be the problem.

    Change that one thing, and wait several weeks to see if that is the solution to the problem. If you change a bunch of things, you don't know which change addressed the problem.

    But honestly? Usually when people make a bunch of changes, none of them works. Why? Usually because they aren't working off an actual diagnosis or an expert who sees the horse and examines him and watches you ride him. A laundry list from the internet isn't the same.

    Unfortunately, the reason a horse is sour is not always 'ulcers,' 'you're working him too hard/you're not sensitive to his needs/he needs more fun time/you are not bonded enough' or 'you need to watch XYZ video from Guru Trainer Joe.'


    WHAT to change? The one thing that looks most likely to solve the problem. How do I decide what that is?

    Let's say my horse were pinning his ears and acting sour, I would watch HOW he is sour, and when. I'd get into more detail. I'd observe. I'd watch how he acts when I come in the stall...is that when he seems 'sour?'

    How he acts when I get on, and I'd have someone else get on him so I could watch very carefully, those first 2-3 steps away from the mounting block(or after the person gets on, if she/he doesn't use a mounting block). Those first 2-3 steps are crucial.

    I'd observe exactly WHEN the sour behavior occurs, and when it does NOT occur. I'd break it down a lot further than 'sour.' I'd look at exactly what he was doing. Pinning his ears and biting as I got on? Walking away from the mounting block like he has a diaper-full? Fussing when FIRST asked to trot? Pinning his ears when asked to canter?

    I'd break it down into detail. That's how I'd decide what to change.

    But the key is, I'd change one thing at a time. Then I'd wait, and observe. Did it work? How well? Again, WHAT I chose to change, would be based on a lot of careful observation, possibly consulting with vet and trainer...and deciding that I had found something specific to respond to, and a specific way to respond to it.

    I'd also consider the possibility that he, like some horses, might get bossy or fussy at times. This can be a temperament thing. Or maybe there are physical reasons.

    I had a horse like that. There was a fix for him. He had a little arthritis in his hocks, a little arthritis in his ankles, "barely rises to the level of age appropriate changes," I was told. A little loss of peripheral vision. No one thing of it was serious, in and of itself. "None of this accounts sufficiently for his behavior," I was told. "What am I gonna DO with him?" I asked the vet. "Drop him down. Don't retire him, he needs to move." So he went to a lower level, pet home. He didn't do so well there, either. He was retired. He was still crabby and sour.

    My other friend's horse was like that, too. And there was no fix for him. He would snap at you when you were grooming him or tacking him up. He would kick out when you girthed him up. The first couple times you asked him to pick up a trot in the ride, he'd pin his ears back as if to say, 'You better back off, you know how I can get.'

    She had tried about fifty bazzillion different things - different girths, saddles, different bits, bridles, nosebands, different ways of getting on, the vet had gone over the horse a bazzillion times, there had been xrays, MRIs, ultrasounds, dentist specialists, chiropractors, big-time veterinary clinics, different trainers, all kinds of specialists(and a few self-proclaimed miracle workers, lol), all of it, for years. Finally, an elderly trainer listened to her years-long tale of woe, and told her, "He's just an <bad word>, you know? That's just how he is."

    I was grooming him once. He turned around to snap at me. He meant business. "Knock it off," I growled. He did it again. I smacked him very lightly on the shoulder with my hand and said, "Knock it OFF." He stopped. He stood there like a little lamby pie for 45 minutes. Butter wouldn't melt in his mouth, as they say.

    What a little stinker. He was a bully. A crabby bully. There was nothing wrong with him. That was just his temperament.

    I hear he was an absolute machine cross country. Mad as hades, too. Just 'get out of my way, I'm DOING THIS!' Never refused a fence.

    The bottom line is this. Enlist some experts in looking at the horse (in person, not on a website). Get ONE idea. Change ONE thing. Wait two weeks. See if it works. Then change something else. See if that works.

     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2019
  2. CarlisleChipper

    CarlisleChipper Senior Member+

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    SLC as you can very well read I am working with my vet, my farrier, AND my trainer. My trainer just thinks he has a mares attitude. I am treating him for ulcers *just in case*. It literally can’t hurt anything to try. The horse you described as an A-hole but still extremely talented XC sounds like Henry. He is incredibly talented and doesn’t have a stop on him. Incredibly bold and brave. He has done a run out on a line before but that was totally my error because we just did a triple combo yesterday and he did it amazingly well. Even got him to trot through it. All of you telling me to change one thing at a time clearly don’t understand that’s
    what I’ve been doing. As I’ve been having to address things since the first of November. Kind of getting annoying. :rolleyes:

    *anyways* I’ll update behavior results or changes as I see them come. In the meantime I will continue to try and make him happy as best as I can, and if he’s just a crab then I can handle that.

    And SLC quit inferring that I come here to ask wtf to do with my horse. *I* make these decisions for my horse and I come here to talk about them. Not to crowd source vet care from the internet. Get real.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2019
  3. RG NIGHT HEIR

    RG NIGHT HEIR Senior Member

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    Bad work ethics are a direct result from the rider/trainer. Horses usually are looking for reward/release.,right?
    So having a talented horse ,drilling ,training without proper release caused Henry to have "bad work ethics".Its never the horse but us humans creating these horse issues.
    I'm not saying from you, but there is no incentive for Henry to do well ,most likely his whole life before you,too.
    A friend of mine has exactly the same issue. Very well bred Warmblood,won many ribbons jumping, all of the sudden he refused to get into the arena,started bucking,misbehaving. All work up by vet,chiropractor negative.
    She changed barns and trainers and found one that is listening to her horse.There are days the trainer just takes him trail riding because he refused to move forward.
    When in the arena she keeps sessions very short and sweet.
    This is an 80000 dollar horse extremely talented and was pushed his entire life to perform.until he said ENOUGH.
     
  4. Mcdreamer

    Mcdreamer Senior Member

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    I could be wrong but I've never known a horse to be grumpy for no reason. After all, we can't REALLY prove that it is for no reason and that's just their personality. Grumpiness is usually related to pain or a horse who simply doesn't like their job. In my experience, it's been helpful to rule out pain and then either give the horse a vacation (my background is in equine therapy and not eventing so it's very common for horses to show signs of grump grump and means it's time for that horse to have a few weeks off OR if time off doesn't help and there's no pain to be found it usually means the horse does not enjoy the job and it's time to find what they do enjoy doing.
    OP sounds like she's including all the right people to try to make the best decision for Henry. I hope ulcers really is the ticket, but if it isn't I hope there is some wiggle room to address possible emotional needs Henry might be trying to communicate.
     
  5. CarlisleChipper

    CarlisleChipper Senior Member+

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    He’s most grumpy doing flat work. LOVES to jump. I don’t think there is any career change that doesn’t involve flat work :rofl: Sorry Henry!

    I’ve been reading this thread
    Esomeprazole (Nexium) for equine ulcers - Chronicle Forums

    AND THERE ARE SO MANY HENRY STORIES. I’m feeling *very* optimistic. :applaud:
     
    Larkspade likes this.
  6. Faster Horses

    Faster Horses Senior Member

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    So, probably someone will remove your link because it is a competing forum... ;)

    But this thread made me try it on my OTSTB. We had great results.
     
    DelP and CarlisleChipper like this.
  7. CarlisleChipper

    CarlisleChipper Senior Member+

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    Oh!! I’m sorry. I didn’t know we couldn’t post links from other forums. Only posting it to have a source for what I’m doing with Henry. Definitely not wanting to impose. I dont even have an account there. :ninja:
     
  8. CarlisleChipper

    CarlisleChipper Senior Member+

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    Correction, First of December not November. Thank goodness for journaling apps.
    5BC3524F-6F13-4693-8EF6-517E87E8FB8C.png
     
  9. CarlisleChipper

    CarlisleChipper Senior Member+

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    F6EBAC69-662C-4C7A-9F77-E6F023333DB3.jpeg Went for a ride today and he felt like a completely different horse. Was forward off my leg, reactive, relaxed. No sourness at all under saddle. Still a bit of ear pinning while grooming but it’s great for only being on the third day of treatment.
    I don’t think I’ve heard him make his relaxed canter breathing for a long time.
    Video Miranda Gallegos

    56E97488-EE04-4F38-B038-DC13522C16D2.png
    A1667C76-9DEE-4090-B6D3-C4B3DBFDE01F.png
    5B409399-7BAF-459F-95FC-A68D238B9307.png
     
  10. Faster Horses

    Faster Horses Senior Member

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    3 days was when I started to notice a reduction in pain as well. :)

    Yay Henry!!
     

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