Nervous but pushy Mustang - re-starting

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by Galexious, Jan 13, 2019.

  1. Vigilante

    Vigilante Registered

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    Aren't they?
    Have you never gone out early to work with the horse and had an extra layer on only to take it off as the day warmed?
    Have you never had a hose or twig across the ground that the horse kicked up while walking?

    Maybe my thinking comes from working in spaces that aren't groomed but it is incredibly common for these sorts of things to happen and is very beneficial for the horse to have learned how to react in a way that doesn't cause injury.

    100% normal ime.
    If yours differs thats fine but I see no reason that a horse needs to sit for a or week or a month or a year before learning basic handling. It doesn't do them any favors.

    You talk about taking your mare on walks and such when you got her, what the op is describing is the exact same thing except in a more controlled, and by extension safer, environment.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2019
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  2. Galexious

    Galexious Senior Member+

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    I just wanted to thank you SINCERELY for your understanding and for your voice. Genuinely appreciate you! If there was a love button, I would have pressed that! :)
     
  3. Dona Worry

    Dona Worry Senior Member

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    If you want to chase your horse around waving sticks at their legs and twirling sweatshirts around your head, by all means go ahead.
     
  4. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    Cool. You don't have to, but the content makes more sense than here. My wording might have seemed odd after I reread it, not my intention.
     
  5. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    Eh, actually that isn't that unusual for desensitization. I honestly haven't read much of this though yet tbh.
     
  6. Galexious

    Galexious Senior Member+

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    No worries. It is training related, but I have no qualms on moving it somewhere it's better recieved.
     
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  7. Vigilante

    Vigilante Registered

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    Okay
     
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  8. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    That is not desensitization at all. It's the opposite of desensitization. They want the horse to react to it by moving away, not be desensitized to it.
     
  9. Galexious

    Galexious Senior Member+

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    Alsosuzieq2 is correct.

    The process of desensitization is defined as the elimination or reduction of natural or acquired reactivity or sensitivity to an external stimulus.

    a behavior modification technique,used especially in treating phobias, in which panic or other undesirable emotional response to a given stimulus is reduced or extinguished, especially by repeated exposure to that stimulus.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2019
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  10. foxtrot

    foxtrot Senior Member

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    Desensitization training is something not all horse people agree on. Personally I have never found the need to get a horse used to every single possible thing it may ever encounter. I try to work on the whole picture and develop a relationship where the horse looks to me as the leader. Then it doesn't matter if it encounters something it never has before.

    Just a difference in philosophy, not an insult. I expect my horses to behave respectfully around humans but I also hate training that nags them. It's why I'm not a huge fan of some trainers like Clinton Anderson because it seems like it's always about nagging the horse about every tiny thing.

    Real world example--today I was playing with my new camera, the flash popped up and one of my horses jumped and backed away. I ignored his spook, took another picture, and he spooked again. Which I ignored, took a third photo, and that time he didn't spook. That's a real scenario, because it was a behavior I was actually doing (taking pictures) and kept doing til it wasn't a big deal. I didn't go out of my way to create the situation and follow him around with a clicking camera just to get him used to it. I expected him to deal once he was presented with something new and strange because we've already established trust.

    There's just a fine line there, for me, but obviously your mileage may vary.
     

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