Nervous but pushy Mustang - re-starting

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by Galexious, Jan 13, 2019.

  1. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    You guys, no sense conversing. She is around 40, just got her VERY first horse in 08. Since, she has been working with a natural horsemanship trainer, so, in her mind, that is all she needs, evidently.

    No sense bothering. Yes, this should be in blogs. When you post to horse training it is a given that you seek advice.
    Please do as Ginster says: send a pm (conversartion) to a mod and get it moved. We tend to ignore those threads.
     
  2. Garfield70

    Garfield70 Senior Member

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    Could also be that she totally exaggerated the "behaviour problems" in the opening post.

    I mean, bucking under saddle is bad. But hard to catch and doesn't allow humans to touch them everywhere is common enough.

    I personally get my hackles rising when people start to talk about their "carrot sticks". Because there is nothing even remotely "carroty" about this whip-like implement. It's just a prettier or fancier word for the lovey-dovey faction who would be outraged at the idea of using something as "bad" as a whip to work with their horse and need to make a statement that they are different than the normal horsey crowd who use "whips".
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2019
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  3. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Historically it goes the other way: people tend to write the truth in the initial post, then, when they hear advice that they see as criticism, they back pedal to mitigate the horse's behavior so that they appear to be doing the right thing.

    But, whatever.
     
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  4. Galexious

    Galexious Senior Member+

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    I wouldn't exaggerate problems. I wouldn't even want problems to exist. Just because they do, doesn't mean he's impossible to take on. A carrot stick is a stick with a carrot tied to it and it's called that IMO ( bc even though you arent physically bribing them with it) youre using it as an extension with which to communicate to the horse in a manner that isn't just slapping it to get sound or fright or physical contact to be the cause of movement. It's a training aid that a horse shouldn't be wide eyed or hyped by the mere presence of. You can call a person a person, a human, an individual, someone, a random, a nobody, an average Joe, a special person, a special person in thier own way, ... They can all mean the same thing, but some have a better association with them than others. It's just a name of equipment, not a throning of oneself to use that term.

    The same way that training or working a horse can be called playing with them. It's serious material, but it's to get the human in the mindset of this should be fun. How can I make this time enjoyable for the horse. Wear a smile, change tactics if something isn't working well. Be creative. Look for ways to make learning enjoyable for both sides.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2019
  5. Dona Worry

    Dona Worry Senior Member

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    But, following a horse around tapping his legs with a whip, and chasing him while twirling a sweatshirt over your head ARE NOT 'every day stimuli'. It's a really weird way to start off a relationship with a new horse. And what is the reasoning behind leaning over his back and carrying 'equipment ' ALL THE TIME? Why not just let him be a horse for a week or two?
    *raises hand* ME, I HAVE.
    But come on. She was CHEWING HAY WITH HIM TO BOND.
    That gets such a side eye from me. So does doing yoga and playing instruments around the horses to bond.

    Maybe I did it wrong, but I dragged my poor horse along while I did farm chores. And yes, I DID pack sandwiches. Maybe we would have bonded faster if I ate grass with her, who knows?

    And no, OP, you don't need to justify anything to me. I am unqualified, inexperienced, and have exactly 2 horses.
     
  6. Galexious

    Galexious Senior Member+

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    Thank you for this personal share. The way YOU chose to approach things with this horse may have been best for him. OR it may not have been. Maybe he could be cuddly and loving and a totally different horse with a different approach. Maybe not.

    Maybe no one actually hit him with something on his head to cause the scratch on his eye. That was just a guess. Vets are humans too. They don't have the ability to see the past or the future in detail. They have a far superior knowledge of medical issues, but that was just a guess. Another vet could have guessed they ran into something.

    For a horse to have gone from being shut in a barn for 2 years to being shut in a stall wouldn't necessarily be the way I approached things with him, but that doesn't make me right and you wrong. I think there is a good area between do nothing with a horse and flood the horse that could serve to have the best benefit.

    I don't think a horse is a just a circus performer, not do I think he's just a worker. I think there is a middle-ground where he can safely carry his rider and also do things that aren't just work for him. I'm not claiming I could have done better by your horse.

    I'm just not of the belief that you have to leave your horse alone to win their hearts. I do expect and believe that you have to give them undemanding time without question. No horse wants to be told what to do every second of the time they're in human company. I also believe there is a way that you can ask a horse to do things that gains your requests being seen as something they can look forward to. Thank you for the time you took sharing.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2019
  7. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    Just move this to the blog section as it is in training. Usually people post situations where they need suggestions here or post a training suggestion or articles. What @ginster said makes sense, good suggestion ginster.
     
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  8. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Anddd, NO paragraphs, still.
     
  9. Galexious

    Galexious Senior Member+

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    Doing things in a horses space other than asking things allows them to have you be in their space in a non threatening way. That is why I choose to do things there that allow time to be spent with him without forcing him to be with me with a lead rope and halter holding him in the same space. I absolutely think hand walks can be beneficial so I'm not dogging them by any means.

    I've not tapped his legs with a whip. I've touched them, but tapping would be asking him to lift them. The REASON behind that is I've seen him kick out at a rope he had behind himself or at weeds. If they frighten him in a manner that he thinks kicking causes them to go away... I don't want to be riding one day and fall off because a twig touched him in a way he didn't find favorable and he unseats me kicking out. It's smart IMO to set your horse up to successfully give you the behavior you want, especially when it will keep you safer over the long haul.

    When I twirled that sweater, what had started it was I flipped in on myself from front to back bc it got chilly and he picked his head up. I didn't want him to be fearful of me moving things, so I said hmm... I wonder what you'd do if I moved it again (granted in an unusual way,) so when he moved off, I said with my body language this isn't something you need to be fearful of. Calm down, it's not going to hurt you and within minutes had him accepting it as no big deal which is ideal scenario.

    I'm not ALWAYS carrying equipment or ALWAYS leaning on him. Those are just untruths. Have I done those things? Yes. I don't want them to be foreign to him. I want him to see that me having that stuff isn't anything that should cause concern for him. The more routine it is, the less stress it will place on him.

    You are right that I don't need to justify myself with you, but I would be happy to have you see things (even as odd or different as they may be from your own ways) have good intentions and can yield great results. You don't have to agree, but it's far nicer to find people that can see things in a good light.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2019
  10. Galexious

    Galexious Senior Member+

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    I have heeded this suggestion and made request with moderator.
     
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