Negotiating Horse Prices

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by Peanut Palomino, May 14, 2018.

  1. Zimalia

    Zimalia Senior Member

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    when I was raising colts, I did not dicker. I told the prospective buyer my price, and that's it. They met it, or they went on down the road. One way to pi$$ me off ROYALLY was to say "what's your bottom dollar?" I don't do that. They asked the price when they called, and I told them. That's it. That's the price!
    What so many buyers forget is THEY CALLED ME. I didn't call them begging them to come look at my horses. I didn't call them begging them to come buy a horse from me. THEY CALLED ME. They asked the price, and I gave it to them.
    If they went on down the road, they would end up competing against a horse of mine. That was their choice.
     
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  2. Circle C

    Circle C Senior Member

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    I hate that, especially on babies. Ppl don't realize just how much money it costs to breed them and raise them.
     
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  3. Zimalia

    Zimalia Senior Member

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    Exactly right Circle C! Nor do they realize the time that it takes to get them ready for sale. Sure I sold some that were not halter broke, but they were before they were picked up. That does not just magically happen. It takes time and the experience to do it right.
    When someone would hit me with that "bottom dollar" BS, I got so I'd see red. They don't go to the grocery store and ask about bottom dollar on groceries, so why are they trying to skin a horse breeder? Nope, they didn't get very far.
     
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  4. bellalou

    bellalou Senior Member

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    I am always open to negotiation when selling. I want a good fit for my horses. And what I ask is what I'd like to get for the horse but not everyone agrees on worth.

    When I buy, I go into it with an idea of what I feel the horse is worth based on the ad and any conversations I've had with the seller. I will adjust that based on what I see and hear at the viewing. And I will offer what I feel the horse is worth.

    If the horse is advertised as non-negotiable, I generally won't bother unless I'm very interested and the price is where I'd want it anyway. A horse is only worth what a person will pay and there should be room to negotiate.
     
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  5. Bakkir

    Bakkir Senior Member

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    I don't haggle with breeders. I have bought 3 that way and loved the fact that I knew what I was getting and had a complete history etc.

    I appreciate that I got a wicked deal on Bakkir. Less than 1/4 of what it cost to breed him.
     
  6. JKetsche

    JKetsche Senior Member

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    I tried one on a recommendation. It was a bit out of my price range, but the owners thought it was a great fit (so did I), so they came to me and said they would be willing to work with me on price--their initiative.
     
  7. palimino57

    palimino57 Senior Member

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    As someone who has bought/sold many a horse, I am used to the negotiating, and would advertise slightly higher then expected knowing 90% of buyers had to feel they won a negotiation.

    My 3 most expensive purchases, I never haggled, at all. But cheap ones I haggle, dunno why, just how it has happened. I am always honest though, and I do tend to discuss price before viewing, because no point me viewing and wasting thier time if I like the horse and can not justify thier asking price. Has worked well in the past, and often get calls returned offering it for asking once they deal with 25 people looking at it and then vanishing, they realise maybe what I have offered is where the price should have been.
     
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  8. emali06

    emali06 Senior Member

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    I HATEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE "Whats your bottom dollar". I delete or ignore those comments. Its so rude.
     
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  9. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    I just had someone text me that remark in regard to my utility trailer. I had it listed at $700.

    I texted them back: $3,000.

    :ROFLMAO:
     
  10. Peanut Palomino

    Peanut Palomino Senior Member

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    The "bottom dollar" question drives me crazy too. I've heard it all the time when selling saddles. I always ask them to make me an offer, but usually people refuse, so I just tell them, "my bottom dollar is the asking price, reasonable offers considered."

    Negotiating and making offers is part of the dance. You can't just skip to "bottom dollar."
     
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