Negotiating Horse Prices

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by Peanut Palomino, May 14, 2018.

  1. Peanut Palomino

    Peanut Palomino Senior Member

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    I'm taking a Business Negotiations class right now and it got me thinking about negotiations involved with horse buying. I thought it could be an interesting discussion. My questions:

    Are all horse prices negotiable?
    We know that private sales are usually expected to be negotiated, but do you also negotiate when buying from a breeder? What about buying from a friend?

    What negotiating tactics do you use? Do you change your tactics based on who the seller is?

    When selling a horse, what tactics are an immediate turn off?


    I know when I sold Peanut I got REAL tired of hearing people's sob stories. Or, they'd try to talk down to me about how he "wasn't that great" to get his price down. I wasn't asking much, so those tactics did not work on me.
     
  2. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    It never hurts to ask. But people do get peeved if the offer is 15% less (or more than that) of their asking price.
     
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  3. StraightandTrue

    StraightandTrue Senior Member

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    I don’t aim to make a profit off any of my horses so they are priced based of the current market, sometimes even a little cheaper to appeal to a larger pool of buyers. Instant turn offs:
    • People who offer me 25% less than what I’m asking. My prices are fair and anyone trying to skim 25% off the price is either broke AF or can’t judge quality. Either way, they’re not someone I want buying my horse.
    • People who try to de-value my horse by pointing out conformation faults that don’t exist. I’m aware of any conformation faults and I would’ve factored them into the price. Making up conformation faults to try and get a better price is not going to win you any brownie points, and it makes you look greedy as well as ignorant.
    • Asking for a discount for paying in a lump sum. Might work if I’m asking $30k for a horse but if you can’t afford to pay $4k up front then, again, you’re broke and stop wasting my time. I expect the horse to be paid for in full before it leaves the property. This isn’t a negotiating point.
     
  4. barrel_racer64

    barrel_racer64 Senior Member

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    I usually decide about what *I* feel like the horse is worth, and if its too big of a price difference then I don't bother making an offer. If its within about $1,000 or so, then I might make an offer. Generally, when I am getting info on the horse to begin with, once the person gets done telling me all about it, I might ask if they are firm on their price. If they are, cool, I'm going to think on it. I don't make excuses for why I should get them cheaper than what they are priced at, its just a straight up, I'll give you x amount. They might take it, they might counter. That to me is the way negotiations are. If it is a big difference in price, I might acknowledge the elephant in the room (if there is one) such as a major behavior problem or physical condition.
     
  5. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    I won't bother looking at horses way out of my price range as I myself hate "looky" people. So, I will go if it's close in price and if I like the horse make my offer. I will only say I wasn't sure if I'd like him, but this is what I can spend if you'd consider that. I'm not a haggler for sure though. I ask them to please keep me in mind if they change their mind.

    I never price horses real high and they're usually just a bit over what I'm willing to accept. Hagglers irritate me as I personally just don't work that way myself. That's me though and not the norm.
     
  6. StraightandTrue

    StraightandTrue Senior Member

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    To answer your question about what tactics DO work to get me to drop the price, if you are a good fit for the horse and offering it a long term home I’ll generally drop 10-20% off the price without you even having to ask. I’m not in it for profit anyway, the home is what’s most important to me.

    I knocked 20% off my current horse when I saw that it paddled. I normally wouldn’t buy a horse with incorrect movement, but the horse had great conformation which made me suspect the paddling was caused by underlying discomfort. Sure enough when I got the horse home my trimmer picked up that the soles of the hoof were unusually hard and thick, putting pressure on the toe which caused the horse to hitch it’s shoulder and break over early (thus paddling). He removed the excess growth and, combined with osteopathy and massage therapy, the paddling has decreased over time to the point where it’s barely noticeable. The seller didn’t bother with a counteroffer. She knew the paddling wasn’t desirable, and I think I’d managed to earn her respect in the way I evaluated the horse. The horse also had a few quirks that made evaluation difficult, such as refusing to pick up its front feet and being difficult to catch. It was all stuff I knew I could fix, but it wasn’t an ideal showing which worked in my favour. It was a bit of a gamble buying the horse so I put forward a price I could live with if things didn’t work out. Luckily the seller accepted and I now have a beautiful horse with correct movement and lovely manners.
     
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  7. PyroTekNik333

    PyroTekNik333 Senior Member

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    Im a shameless haggler lol
    But if the ad says the price is firm I don't. If it doesnt say I will ask before I go waste my time or theirs.

    I offer what the horse is worth to me. Many people get caught up in loving their hirse and seeing what it could be. Thats all well and good but you need to unlock the potential is you want to get paid for it. I habe to account for the time and money I'll put into the animal myself.

    I have a lot more turn offs than turn ons lol

    Turn on when I'm selling is seeing the person work well with the animal and/or anyone who tells me about their mentor, bonus if they brought them along. I like knowing a person isnt too proud to ask for help if they need it.
    I have and will continue to give hefty discounts to "the one" lol
    I can afford to do that because I don't do this for money I do it because I enjoy figuring out horses that have been given up on and giving them a new chance.

    Turn offs, wasting my time. Don't spend hours with my horse. I have a real life with a real job. Don't pretend you are over 18, I am going to find you out anyway. A no show to an appt will not get another appt.
    Don't waste your time telling me how awesome you are, I can tell from how you handle the horse if you are awesome. Or not ;)

    Refusing to tell me what you want in a horse. It makes no sense. I have the horse, I have a good idea of its capabilities. I can let you know right away this black apha that sweats at the thought of work is not going to tevis anytime ever lol

    The number one thing for me is messaging me a million questions that were answered in the ad. Read the ad.
    The horse I list as for experienced riders, no beginners is capitol letters with an exclamation point thrown in is NOT for beginners. Not even advanced beginners *head desk*
     
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  8. barrel_racer64

    barrel_racer64 Senior Member

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    This. If you know the price is firm, don't waste everyones time if its not what you are willing to spend. I set my budget for the individual horse and stick to it pretty firm.
     
  9. Bakkir

    Bakkir Senior Member

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    I used the fact that I am experienced to negotiate. Charm needed a lot of work and I knew that going in. So my offer was almost 50% of asking.
     
  10. barrel_racer64

    barrel_racer64 Senior Member

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    That is my kind of negotiating! I just got Baly for almost 1/2 what they originally told me they were asking. (I saw just before I bought her that the owner had their friend list her for $500 more than what he had told me as well.)
     

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