Needing some ELPO trimming guidance!

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by DriftwoodsQHs, Nov 4, 2018.

  1. DriftwoodsQHs

    DriftwoodsQHs Senior Member

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    I've known about ELPO for a while now and really love idea of it, but haven't been able to find an ELPO certified trimmer near me and have always been too chicken to attempt it on my own. I even got as far as buying an Anvil hoof knife at one point when I wanted to try it with Juno, but ended up giving it to my farrier after years of it sitting in the box it came in.

    Recently I had the idea of doing maintenance/top trims with just a rasp between farrier visits in order to keep Echo's hooves better balanced, and somehow found my way back to ELPO trimming in my googling efforts. After binging a ton of videos on the ELPO website, I think it's safe to say that I'm now more afraid of my farrier ruining my horse than myself!
    I've been digging up all sorts of old threads on the topic and have found some really great information and videos. From what I understand it's best to first attempt mapping/trimming after your farrier trims so that you don't have to struggle with a bunch of excess hoof? My question is, what is the best length of time to wait after a trim? I'm assuming the sooner you do it, the higher the risk of ending up with a sore horse?

    I'm going to need an online mentor or two if I'm going to go through with this! @IIIBarsV @JBandRio @Arem @BluemoonOKy ? Anyone up for the job?
    I know Patty Stiller isn't active anymore, which is a real bummer :(
     
  2. Arem

    Arem Senior Member

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    How soon after a trim that you can work on the feet depends on how well the farrier is or isn’t trimming the horse and what the balance is like. How much you do depends on that also.

    Good hoof pictures are super helpful! :)
     
  3. BluemoonOKy

    BluemoonOKy Senior Member

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    Tell your farrier you want to Learn the Elpo method and get him to teach you how to trim. Get your Sharpie marker and a straight edge and start mapping the foot. Also look on the hoof rehab facebook page (Pete ramey) lots of good pics and examples there. Not Elpo, but ...
    Sure, post pics with good lighting. Good Hoof Photos - How to take Good Hoof Photos
    I trim my horses weekly/biweekly to keep the balance. But it will depend on what your farrier actually does and how his trim is, so hard to give you a time frame.
     
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  4. DriftwoodsQHs

    DriftwoodsQHs Senior Member

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    Thanks guys! I’ll get some pics after her next trim, which should be this week. I should be able to get by with just a good hoof knife and a rasp? A hoof stand would be awesome, but I’m sure you get what you pay for, and the high quality ones are pretty pricey!
     
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  5. DriftwoodsQHs

    DriftwoodsQHs Senior Member

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    Think I should be safe to follow this video as closely as possible? I’m assuming all the negative comments on the video are coming from people that use outdated/improper trimming methods?
     
  6. DriftwoodsQHs

    DriftwoodsQHs Senior Member

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    As I continue to learn more from old threads, I'm also coming up with lots of questions. Lots.
    Will I be able to pare down the bars as far as they need to go on the first trim, or will that need to be done gradually over time? Can I rasp the heels all the way back to where they should be all in one go? How about for rockering the toe? (By the way, is the end goal to have the toe end at the break over point and no longer have a rockered toe at all?)
    No need to worry about doing damage when "digging" down to find the true apex of the frog as long as it's done slowly and carefully, correct?
    What should the height of the hoof wall be in comparison to the sole? I have yet to see this part explained as thoroughly as I'd like!
    I've read somewhere that the toe pillars shouldn't be rasped down as far as the heels, is this correct?
    Does this all depend on what shape the hooves are in/how distorted they are?
     
  7. Arem

    Arem Senior Member

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    Sometimes you can take the bars down all the way in one go, sometimes not. It depends on how distorted the hoof is.

    The same goes for the heels and toe, too. You don’t want to take the heels all the way back to “0” if you can’t take the toe down to “ 0” as well. And vise versa. (0 meaning no distortion)

    It’s good to leave just a little hight in the toe pillars to help keep the horse from getting footsore after a trim. Generally, you can take the rest down to the level of the sole.

    I’m not brave when it comes to digging. :p I tend to err on the side of caution. Pay attention to how much depth you have between frog and bars. That will help give you an idea of how deep you can safely go.
     
  8. Arem

    Arem Senior Member

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    I think that’s one of the videos I’ve studied from so, yes, I believe so. :)
     
  9. DriftwoodsQHs

    DriftwoodsQHs Senior Member

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    Perfect explanations thank you Arem!! I'm pretty excited to give this a shot. Bought a rasp today, farrier will be out Wednesday morning and is going to show me how to use the tools, and hoof knife should get here Friday! Going to get some before and after pics of the trim on Wednesday. I believe it's been 8 weeks since her last trim (will have to double check), but boy do they look bad already.
     
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  10. Mayelix

    Mayelix Senior Member

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    Here are the latest videos

    Equine Lameness Prevention Organization, Inc. - Powered by AMO

    In my experience trimming my own horse I’ve been able to get the heels back to 0 every time but the bars took a while. Not saying this is the case for all...

    I would not be “digging” ... really if you just cut the tip off the frog the apex should be easy to see/feel. If your horse has flat soles you *really* don’t want to dig, that means there is very little protection between the coffin bone & the ground. It also depends how much dead sole you have in that area...You can also guesstimate the apex at 2x the length of the central sulcus. With a barefoot trim you want to leave more material by the toe and will not be exfoliating the entire foot until it’s waxy. Exfoliate the back half of the foot so you can properly map. You don’t compromise protection for balance... a barefoot horse can wear its feet down and self balance in a way, on the other hand, if you were to be shoeing getting the balance correct is extremely important.
     
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