Need advice with my TWH

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by Misty H, Nov 14, 2017.

  1. Misty H

    Misty H Full Member

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    The saddle is being made. I asked about that with his weight. They stated before even ordering, when I spoke with the TWH expert even when he gains weight it will not change the saddle fit on him. The bar is a standard 88.5 which is normal unless you have a beefed up steroid TW would it be 90. The gullet is height at 8 inch and the bar spread is 12 1/2 inches which will fit him regardless of his weight. He will also have a narrow twist on the saddle
     
  2. CabterCrazy

    CabterCrazy Senior Member

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    When he gains weight it will change the saddle fit. Same as when he is in work, the way the saddle fits him will change. That is why you can have a saddle fit perfectly in the spring and by summer its completely different fitting.
     
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  3. Misty H

    Misty H Full Member

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    I understand what you are saying. But the same behavior is in him if leaving even without a saddle. He has been vet checked 3 times since May 22. Two of those times I had done. I have had the chiropractor come look at him for soundness. The ferrier has checked him out and done his hooves. There are absolutely no signs of pain anywhere and no evidence of any. He has had his molars checked and his teeth floated. He is on a full cheek shaffle. He does great when he is out (with another horse) follows all commands.
     
  4. CabterCrazy

    CabterCrazy Senior Member

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    Then I would pin it on attitude issue and him not trusting or respectingyou enough. Find a trainer who can come work with the two of you in the spring, focus on getting his trust and respect. You need to be his leader, and right now he is not looking to you as his leader.
     
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  5. Faster Horses

    Faster Horses Senior Member

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    This is because he respects his herd (the other horses) and not you.

    I'm convinced you would do best with a trainer out to help you work with the horse on the ground as well as in the saddle (at an appropriate time).

    This likely isn't a "fix my horse", this is "fix how YOU are handling the horse" which can really only be done in person.
     
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  6. Misty H

    Misty H Full Member

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    I can respect that. I will seek out a trainer who can work with me on these issues. I am by no means a pro and far from it. I will get it right even if it takes several trainers to work on him and ME
     
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  7. Kristal H

    Kristal H Senior Member

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    Your horse timid and is at the bottom of the pecking order and lacks confidence both at protecting his feed and in riding alone.
    I would start small....
    By riding him alone in the field where he can see his pasture mates, when he is comfortable with that then at the end of the ride ask him to go down the driveway and back. Then when is good with that go a little further and so on....soon he understand that he can go out safely with you as his leader without another horse. Make sure that every lesson ends on a good note... this may mean going back and riding him in the pasture.
     
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  8. Misty H

    Misty H Full Member

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    I will try this also, Thank you. I agree with you he is definitely timid. He spooks easy if one of the other horses move to close to him. He gets scared. He is fine with being close to them (right beside them) as long as a fence is between them. He knows they can’t charge him then. Also he makes sure he is directly behind joker when we are out on the trails. He rarely will even go beside him and if he does he is taking the lead for a short time. Then he stops and goes back behind him again. Almost like an elephant.

    Also if they go into his barn to eat his hay he looks for me and will just have a sad look. He will not go in his pasture or barn if they are at his hay
     
  9. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    Horses don't have the same emotionally charged responses as people do. I really don't know what's going on, but thinking he's sad and needy..nah. That's you putting that on him.

    You've had him since May? If its cold where you're at, you might want to wait, but you need to have a trainer out. See how he acts with an experienced horseman and go from there.

    For grins have a chiro look at him if you've not already, but get a trainer out, either now or turn him out till spring and get at it then. I've a real feeling it's something that'll be evident when a pro rides. It could be eye opening.

    Good luck no matter what you decide-!! ;)
     
  10. gaitedboomer

    gaitedboomer Senior Member

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    I am going to respectfully give you a little history on Tennessee Walking Horses:tiphat:

    All bloodlines, except for one, trace back to Midnight Sun:). The only bloodline without any Midnight Sun in it for years, was the old Chance line:)

    Walking Horses do not do dressage at sanctioned shows. Your horse comes from a bloodline of Performance Walkers that many of them wore stacks, aka Packages in the show ring. Many of those horses didn't "make" for Big Lick and were sold at auction.

    That is how I got the horse in my avatar - he didn't "make" for Big Lick. The formal name of the horse in my avatar is "Bonafide Genius". He was sired by Pride's Genius in 1987.

    If your horse was sired by Pride's Genius he is half brother to my horse in the avatar:)


    Duke lived with me 24 of his 27 years and is laid to rest on my current farm. He was a big motored horse, a strong and fair alpha leader, and never made a mistake. He was a solid trail horse that wore a "no fear" t-shirt and walked those words. He was my P-R horse when I hauled a horse for someone. He never refused. He went out the driveway alone and never called to his barn mates. He was always a joy to ride. He my heart horse.
    ******
    One of my other Walking Horse, on the other hand, is EXACTLY like your horse when it comes to going out alone. He has some Generator breeding in him. When he was young, he would either plant his feet and I would have to get off and walk him a ways, or he would lay down and I would have to connect the riding crop to his butt. If someone rode him behind my Duke (the avatar horse, he would travel down the state highway and not flick an ear. He would have followed Duke off a cliff.

    He does not handle open space very well, not even in his 19 acre pasture. If I could get him to the trails in the woods before he had a meltdown, we would have a great ride. He is now 23 and has been with me 21 years. He came a long way in terms of being anxious alone, but when Duke passed three years ago, then my 29 yr old Arab passed six months later, Rusty had a meltdown that took him a nearly a year to get over.

    All I can suggest is first, I hope you wear a "no fear" t-shirt and can walk that walk meaningfully. I would not spur the horse, but I would carry a riding crop and be prepared to lace him hard on the butt when he plants his feet ---- which I am a lot happier when they plant feet instead of going up and over backward:faint:

    I managed to work Rusty partly out of his ride-by-himself fears by getting off and walking him for awhile and just flat out telling him what a ditz he was. They can tell by the tone of your voice when you look them In the eye and tell them how stupid they are.

    I can't ride anymore but I do a lot of liberty work with Rusty and he is so good at things, he puts a lump in my throat. it's hard to believe he is the horse that was always work to ride.

    I also have him on a grain-free and soy-free diet. I have added magnesium maleate (NOT Mag oxide) to his supplements. He is less anxious but he still needs to be able to see my other horse.

    I haven't given you much help, horses like this are work to ride because they are heck bent to remain buddy sour.

    I think this kind of horse needs a strong but fair rider and a LOT of wet, solitary blankets. For While take him out on the same trails until you know the number of branches on every tree, lollol them gradually ride him further out. Based on my horse, you need to keep riding or the horse will regress if he is left in the pasture for too many weeks.

    Best of luck with him -- he is a good horse, I sure hope you can get him over this buddy sour hurdle:charge:
     
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