My Gentle OTTB Becoming Hot and Unruly

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by bkat, Jan 9, 2018.

  1. bkat

    bkat Registered

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    I know, It's so difficult to find the root of the issue since the weather has been atrocious. But my hunch is definitely the feed. I could switch back to Nutrena Safechoice Senior as he seemed to be doing well on that and no attitude problems. I have also been looking into Purina Ultium, have you heard anything about that feed?
     
  2. bellalou

    bellalou Senior Member

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    That's when you have to be in charge. You have to ride every stride and insist on correct. I know a lot of people lunge to burn off energy - I've never had that work with a TB. That's what they love to do. It amps them up. I actually lunge AFTER I ride.

    Before you start feeling that "little ball of energy," you have to ask for a change. Don't let it get to the point where he's jumping out of his skin. You start feeling an edge, ask for a change of direction, or a leg yield, or a shoulder in. I ask for a turn on the forehand sometimes - that really gets her focused and thinking.

    When she's in a mood like this, I will often do an entire workout at a walk. And then I'll free lunge or turn out and let her run and play. Or I'll ride at a walk for a good 30 - 45 minutes until she's settled, and then I ask for trot. If I get a bouncy, head-up, rushy, I'm-going-to-buck trot, we go right back to walk work. No trot until we get solid walk. No trot until we can transition without climbing up the wall. That's the rule and she knows it.

    And the other thing is, when she's in those moods, my rides tend to be shorter rather than longer. I ride until she is settled, soft and behaving and I end when I get what I want. Which on those days is settled, soft and behaving.
     
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  3. Garfield70

    Garfield70 Senior Member

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    Can you upload a video of you riding him?

    Because maybe you just expect a docile slug and panic at normal TB lively temperament.
     
  4. bkat

    bkat Registered

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    Well that is an interesting assumption...it definitely is not a "normal TB lively temperament" and especially not normal for him, but alright.
     
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  5. bellalou

    bellalou Senior Member

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    I don't really think there is such a thing as "normal TB lively temperament" myself. I have several friends who have very quiet and solid OTTBs that are willing and hard-working, not sluggish but not what I'd call "forward."

    Then there are the OTTBs I know that are very sensitive, very forward and very dramatic, such as my dear Bella. Others are hot, hot, hot but responsive, some are less hot but very forward, some are not overly forward but still sensitive and temperamental.

    Your horse began as quiet but he was also not in optimal condition. So the question is whether he is now showing his true temperament because he's in better health or whether his behavior is feed or stabling related. It seems easiest to start by going back to what he was being fed when he was behaving calmly and see if that makes a difference.
     
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  6. bkat

    bkat Registered

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    Exactly. I've ridden so many TBs and all were very different from one another. And what you said is correct, he could be showing his true temperament and if that's the case, I'll be sadly disappointed. I guess I can learn to adapt to his jerky-attitude and difficulties while riding but it's going to be a rough journey if that's the case.
     
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  7. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Yes I have experience with this.

    You are feeding your horse way too much concentrated feed(bagged feed, grain, however it's called). He's fresh.

    A quart of most horse feeds weighs 1 lb to 1.5 lbs.

    Let's say your horse weighs 1000 lbs. It sounds like he's only getting light work, so looking at the feed recommendation for that -

    The manufacturer says he should be getting .5 lbs per 100 lbs weight, that is 5 lbs, not 8-12 lbs of their product.

    I don't know why you are feeding your horse so much concentrated feed. Be careful with Thoroughbreds as many are not ever going to look 'muscular' or 'fat enough'. They are often built differently from other horses and just do not bulk up if you feed them more - they just get fresh.
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2018
  8. LoveTrail

    LoveTrail Senior Member

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    If you can't change the hay or add more maybe substitute with alfalfa or timothy pellets instead of more grain.

    For me I now stay away from any grain that has corn in it. Messed up my horse and I keep on meeting more and more people that also have horses that are also allergic to corn. I have helped two friends get their horses better by just recommending taking their horses off of corn. One manufacturer said it had no corn in it's grain, but listed maize in the ingredients. :no:
     
  9. 250girl

    250girl Senior Member

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    This can often be the result of a horse just plain feeling better. I’ve had it happen multiple times. Get a horse off the track or from the auction, start feeding it good food, some vet and chiro, and working on confidence under saddle.
    Weight starts coming, coat looking nice and healthy, muscling starting in the right places and then .... BAM!!! I’ve got a whole lot more horse under me !!
     
  10. Rachel1786

    Rachel1786 Senior Member

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    I read through all the replies earlier, but now I can't remember exactly was already said, so please forgive me if I repeat what was already said.

    I would first cut back on his grain, possibly even change him back to safe choice senior(or something different if possible, my OTTB does great on triple crown senior, its very low NSC, so great for horses who need calories but get stupid on large amounts of feed) if changing the feed does not help, I would then speak to your vet about the possibility of ulcers. My mare is prone to getting them despite my best efforts to prevent them, and when she is having an ulcer flare up, she is a nightmare, she's spooky, moody, and overally reactive to everything. I can always tell when they flare up because of her behavior, she's a different horse regardless but she takes it to a whole new level when her ulcers are flaring up.
     

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