My Farrier is a Freaking Miracle Worker

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by Touch the Sky, Aug 5, 2018.

  1. Arem

    Arem Senior Member

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    No. Wrong.
     
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  2. Arem

    Arem Senior Member

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    I’m hesitant to mention it, but wouldn’t be too certain it isn’t a farrier issue, judging by how tall his feet usually look in pictures. :oops:
     
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  3. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    What I wrote is not wrong. If what I wrote was wrong, no horse would ever have to be put down for laminitis. Just go get the freaking miracle worker farrier at any point in the course of the disease, no matter how long it's been left or how severe it is or how acute it is, and all is healed.

    Which is nonsense.

    For example, my pony. His rotation is less after MANY(OP - not one trim - MANY) correct trims, but making the hoof 'look nice' does not always fix what is inside.

    He was trimmed 'beautifully' numerous times with no change in rotation. None. Zero. The trim was changed. And once we got it started improving, which required a different trim, it was very slow to change. We got to a point where it didn't continue to improve. The trim was changed AGAIN.

    Also for example, he still has very 'thin soles.' What this means is that in all the years he was let to have repeat bouts of lamintis, and all that rotation, you can actually fix the rotation but still have the bones in the feet drop substantially, even when the rotation is improved.

    In fact I have seen MANY farriers make a foundered foot look REALLY nice and customers crow that he's a freaking miracle worker, and it had zero - and I mean zero - effect on rotation. The xrays tell the true story.

    It is not about making the foot look normal. It's a little bit more complicated than that.

    Further, some feet cannot be fixed. Just cannot be. The farrier can do whatever, but the structure inside the foot is too damaged - it is a support structure, if the inner tissues are too badly damaged there is no recourse. My friend had a brilliant farrier who did 'everything right' and her horse STILL foundered and had to be euthanized.

    If the inside of the foot is destroyed they can't change that.

    Farriers are not freaking miracle workers. Ever.

    They do the best they can with the situation. The foot may be too severely damaged to recover. They may correct rotation (over MANY trims, OP) yet still wind up with a horse with thin soles and some dropping of the bones of the feet. They may also arrive and find a horse that is so extremely damaged by laminitis that the kindest thing is to euthanize the animal

    Farriers are not freaking miracle workers.
     
  4. Arem

    Arem Senior Member

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    Truly farriers *are* miracle workers and it is absolutely possible to correct alignment. Bone remodeling can not be repaired but alignment can absolutely be fixed.

    Horses with laminitis can both be made sound again and their alignment can be fixed. Some cases may always need special showing, but in many cases hooves can be brought back healthier than they were prior to the laminitis.

    Welcome to the future.
     
  5. Circle C

    Circle C Senior Member

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    Yep. I've seen the alignment improve on my own horse so I know a balanced hoof can really help improve bone alignment.
     
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  6. reicheru

    reicheru Senior Member

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    All within reason, of course. Let me see if I can find the xray that was taken on my old foundered stud horse. We had minimal success with him but managed to keep him comfortable for almost a year before putting him down.
     
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  7. doublelranch

    doublelranch Senior Member

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    I have been through this with my Cushing's pony, and yes they can. My concern with the OP pic is that the heels are way too long IMO. If there was rotation, the long heels would contradict realignment. I would still like to know if there were ever x-rays taken of OPs horse though.
     
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  8. reicheru

    reicheru Senior Member

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    FB_IMG_1533587641103.jpg

    I knew I had it on FB somewhere. I can remember standing with Fat and hearing the vet go "holy spit" from the back room. The fact that my farrier at the time was able to keep him reasonably comfortable with careful management was the miracle. Poor old man. I wish I had picked him up years earlier.
     
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  9. doublelranch

    doublelranch Senior Member

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    Yes. Holy spit!
     
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  10. Arem

    Arem Senior Member

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    Holy crap! I’d have fallen clean over.

    The bone remodeling would have never gone away, and with an older horse it’s harder to set anything back right. Poor old man. Glad he had a soft landing with you.

    When they’re that far gone, improvement is limited. But (complete) soundness and realignment is totally within the realm of possibility. And even in those whose hooves can never be restored to “normal” because of the years and years of damage, complete (specially shod) soundness and usability (showing even) is totally possible.
     
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