My Farrier is a Freaking Miracle Worker

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by Touch the Sky, Aug 5, 2018.

  1. LoveTrail

    LoveTrail Senior Member

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    What's the feed? That might not be quite right. When Foxy was on the wrong feed he had a small flaring issue that I knew was not farrier related. His was too much starch, aka corn.
     
  2. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Farrier can un-collapse foot?
     
  3. ginster

    ginster Senior Member

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    The last two pics-is he freshly trimmed there? Just asking because there seems to be some unevenness in the hoofwall...
     
  4. Touch the Sky

    Touch the Sky Senior Member

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    Not sure what you mean by that?
     
  5. Touch the Sky

    Touch the Sky Senior Member

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    No this was about weeks later. I forgot to take pics the day of. He is currently on a 6 week trim schedule as we gradually get his angles back.
     
    ginster likes this.
  6. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I think based on how the foot looked in the first picture the farrier has done what he or she can, depending of course on what the time between the two pictures actually is.

    It's a complicated subject. A farrier can pretty up the foot (make its outer shape look better) and still not improve the alignment of the bones inside the foot or bring about long term soundness.

    If I was going to decide if a farrier was a freaking miracle worker or not, I'd want to see before and after videos of the horse moving. Keeping in mind that even a freaking miracle worker cannot make every horse sound.

    I'd want xrays, before and after, too. I wouldn't proceed until I had them.

    What a person would say about this horse/situation also depends on what the viewer thinks caused the misshapen foot. A lot of people would assume that the foot looks like that simply because 'the feet were neglected for a long time' or 'poor farrier work.' I'm not sure that's all that's going on here.

    What it looks like is that the horse has chronic laminitis. Both feet are misshapen in the first picture, but it appears that the left front foot is more abnormal. In the 'after' picture it looks like the farrier did what he could to create a more normal-looking shape to the hoof.

    The problem is this: that doesn't necessarily mean the bones inside the foot are suddenly in a more normal or sounder position in all ways. Often, that simply cannot be done.

    With this horse, because of the amount of deformity of the hooves, I would think:

    1. There is considerable rotation of the bones inside the feet, more in the left than the right.
    2. Improvement can't be assessed by looking at the outside of the hooves
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2018
  7. Circle C

    Circle C Senior Member

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    Yikes. I would not be happy with that. I'd be xraying those hooves and If the horse isn't growing any foot, then I'd be putting a good balanced trim on him and some glue ons. He'll never grow any foot if he keeps wearing it off.
     
  8. Touch the Sky

    Touch the Sky Senior Member

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    It's difficult for me to say because I have no idea what he looked like before I got him. I have tried to get pictures and videos but the person who owned him moved and I have no way of contacting them.
    The reason his feet deteriorated was because they left shoes on him for at least 6 months with no care in between. When the shoes finally came off, half his foot did as well, or so I was told. Getting his history between the track and when I got him has been like pulling teeth. I dont know a lot of it. I only know that, according to his track trainer he was quiet, sweet and easy to handle for the experienced people. He was a beast in the field but unfortunately, despite his best efforts he just wasn't fast enough. He was retired sound and sent to a Hunter jumper barn for let down and training in a new career. About 2 years later he was sold, dropped off the face of the earth, and resurfaced 8 months later.
    When I brought him home, he was flighty, aggressive, could barely walk and tried to go after anyone who went in his stall, especially towards his food.
    Its been a long road back. We are trying our best to get him back to his old self but its hard because I dont know what his old self is like.
    As for his feet. I will try to get videos of his movement from when I got him. He is super stiff in his hips because they are put of alignment but the chirp is coming hopefully next week. So hopefully that will help as well
     
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  9. ginster

    ginster Senior Member

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    Did your vet want the schedule? Was he x.rayed to see if there is any rotation and how severe?
     
    LoveTrail likes this.
  10. Circle C

    Circle C Senior Member

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    I would suggest 2-3 massage sessions by a good EMT before you schedule the chiro. I was having issues with my horse taking his left lead and some uneven muscle development... 2 massage session and he is literally back to 100%. I dont even need to schedule the chiro now like I initially thought. Those feet alone are going to make him body sore.
     
    GONE ROPING likes this.

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