Most dangerous experience with horses.

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by WesternRider22, Feb 12, 2018.

  1. WesternRider22

    WesternRider22 Full Member

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    Let's talk about some of the most dangerous experiences we've had while being around or riding horses. A couple of years back I was walking in my friends field and I dropped something so bent down to pick it up and behind me I saw "midnight", their black colt galloping right toward me before I could get up he had already jumped over my head... I was in shock!:faint:
     
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  2. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Let's see.
    It could be any of the number of times one of the STBs I was training a mile took a bad step and fell with me. Flying through the air for 50 or so feet all of a sudden is no fun.
    Or the horse we had that hit his left knee with his right hoof, fell forward in the cart then, not having the brains to try and catch himself before his nose hit the ground, kicked both barrels up under the seat of the cart and catapulted me through the air.

    When I got up and back to him to grab the line, he took off with me hanging from the bit, headed straight towards a four board wooden fence.

    Then I had to swing out and let go while he continued to gallop down the track, one shaft between his hind legs, scaring a grooup of two year old colts into running off the track into the woods. Then he rounded thefar turn and went between the grader and the fence, (no reason to, the track was 200' wide, no other horses there) destroyed the jog cart and then proceeded to try and climb another board fence into a field with a bunch of mares in it.

    Or the time the dingbat of a groom my boss hired allowed the horse she was bathing to walk all over the place and he walked up to the barn, bit the plastic sheathing that was put up over the windows of the open shedrow every winter which startled the horse I had just taken from his stall. He lifted me off the ground and proceeded to gallop down the shedrow with my guts just missing the bottom latches on every stall's dutch door that was open and at a 90 degree angle from the barn. Which was all of them. Someone on the back side of the barn heard the hoofbeats and stopped him right before he would have had to exit the barn at the end wall.

    Or the time one of the grooms thought he was being a help and removed the earplugs from a horse's ears who had to wear them in noisy areas or else he would jump first, ask questions later.
    I was walking the horse, someone dropped a metal scraper onto zhe concrete floor of the paddock and he jumped straight up, spun around 360 degrees, and when he landed, still right next to me but now facing the opposite direction, *I* was under the cooler with him. :ROFLMAO:

    All those things can get your heart beating out of your chest pretty good.:D
     
  3. WesternRider22

    WesternRider22 Full Member

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    Woah! You Have Had some Tough experiences! Just thinking about them almost gives me a heart attack!
     
  4. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Actually, I know many others who trained STBs who had worse things happen. I really, after over 20 years in the business, came out pretty unscathed.
     
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  5. WesternRider22

    WesternRider22 Full Member

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    "Or the time the dingbat of a groom my boss hired allowed the horse she was bathing to walk all over the place and he walked up to the barn, bit the plastic sheathing that was put up over the windows of the open shedrow every winter which startled the horse I had just taken from his stall. He lifted me off the ground and proceeded to gallop down the shedrow with my guts just missing the bottom latches on every stall's dutch door that was open and at a 90 degree angle from the barn. Which was all of them. Someone on the back side of the barn heard the hoofbeats and stopped him right before he would have had to exit the barn at the end wall."
    Lol! Woah! That Is Scary!:eek2::faint:
    Sometimes I think it would be better to stick with a toy horse!:charge: Lol!!!!:LOL::ROFLMAO: Jk!
     
  6. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Thankfully, that was the last straw with her and she finally got fired that day. One of the other second trainers had just told her to keep that horse away from the plastic windows, right before this happened.
     
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  7. Pirate

    Pirate Senior Member

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    We had a young horse entered for a trial at our local racecourse we planned to give her an hour to settle in as she'd never been there. We get a call saying they're running early, so poor filly was grabbed driven over to the track and heading to the start 5 minutes after we arrived.
    Of course afterwards she was thoroughly over excited and while having her bath she bowled her trainer over and came at me.
    I tried to jump for it but she got my left foot and then trod on my leg with her other foot. Then she reared getting me in the stomach with her knees and flinging me a few metres.
    Some other trainers ran in and got her while I hopped to safety with a broken foot. Her trainer was ok just very wet from the hose I dropped but after that she had to be lead by two people when out in public.
     
  8. endurgirl

    endurgirl Senior Member

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    Two horses stand out in my mind.

    One was a TB. I was riding race horses at a nearby track. I have forgotten his name but he was a big, tall bay gelding. I was thrown up on him and about the time I was up there good, he threw his head back and hit me in the nose, I come off real quick and leaned on the truck until I could think clearly again. Got back on him and raced. He would come out of the gate first every time, but could not maintain his speed, I still remember what his gallop felt like, LOL.

    The other horse.... probably the worst horse I've ever ridden. He was a bay Arabian, beautiful, and had the best ground manners ever. But he had about 8 screws that would come lose when you were riding him. It was a shame because he was not spooky one bit, had a very efficient ground covering stride. But would absolutely break in half with no warning. He has ran me into round pen panels, arena walls, pine trees, you name it. We were doing a training ride, he was fine.. all of a sudden took off straight into a row of pine trees, scraped me off and took off running. I finally come up on him and he was standing on the trail with his rein wrapped around his leg. Got back on and rode him in at a walk. One other time, we were at the Big South Fork, normal morning. I went to mount up, the TIME my butt touched the saddle, he turned bronc, bucked me off, luckily I had a helmet on, took off running. Someone caught him and I went to go get him, I was so feed up with his BS, I told him, "either you're going to win this race, or you'll die trying" :rofl:. We won. By 18 minutes. And won Best Condition. I just looked, I also won the race before on him, and gotten a 4 th before that so he was a GOOD horse, but Cray Cray. The next ride we went to was a muddy sloppy freezing rain, got lost on a poorly marked trail and by the time we made it back to camp, he was a tick off, so I was happy we got pulled, I went inside the warm trailer :rofl:,.

    The owner's son was going to ride him the next ride, he bucked him off onto a gravel road, and that was the end for him. He was sold for $1 to a person in NC who was told everything about this horse, that person ended up misrepresenting this horse to the next buyer, she paid over a grand for him with no knowledge of his history, she was bound and determined to fix him, about a year ago i talked to her to check on his progress. Despite completely restarting him, chiro visits, vet checks, teeth done, etc, he still was unsafe under saddle and she used him to teach groundwork lessons.

    He was by far the most dangerous horse I've been around, but I won't waste my time now on such a horse, too many good ones out there!

    20180213_061721.png
     
  9. gaitedboomer

    gaitedboomer Senior Member

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    I used to reschool some really rank horses that resulted in a lot of excitement and getting tossed, but the scariest and potentially most dangerous thing was the day myself and two others were trying to cross a four lane highway and one rein broke.

    The horse in my avatar was already cued and geared up to rush across that highway.

    I bailed fast, still hanging onto his head stall for dear life and praying he would whoa when I hollered whoa ---- I was pulling down on the bit and that could have resulted in a really panicked horse.

    Thankfully he did stop --- right on the edge of the road ---- as cars were coming that, if they slowed down, I didn't see them:faint:
     
  10. Ms_Pigeon

    Ms_Pigeon Senior Member

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    An already high-string gelding who got swarmed by bees in his stall. My barn was having a horse camp for preschoolers at the time and I had to shout to my assistants to get the little ones safely away in the tack room before getting him out of his stall, where he was (understandably) spinning in circles on his hind legs.

    We were incredibly lucky: he only sustained a couple of stings and the vet was less than a mile away at another barn. He had no ill effects (though we did change his stall while he got over the initial trauma!).
     

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