Monthly Horse Costs?

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by A. Rose, May 15, 2018.

  1. rhinebeck

    rhinebeck Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2010
    Messages:
    6,131
    Likes Received:
    5,949
    I’m an oddball but I always assume if they are at home I also feed weird feed

    Monthly
    40-50 bales of hay - 5-7$ each
    2 bags feed: 60$
    Hay cubes: 30$

    Repairs
    Fencing: 10-100
    Buildings: 50-200

    Costs:
    Vet : always have $ on hand for emergencies (1000$+++)
    Electric: 40-60$
    Water: highly varies

    Plus so much more
     
    Alsosusieq2 likes this.
  2. Circle C

    Circle C Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2005
    Messages:
    17,023
    Likes Received:
    9,533
    It's cheaper & easier to just board. lol
     
    ChestersMomma likes this.
  3. mooselady

    mooselady Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2012
    Messages:
    12,697
    Likes Received:
    36,534
    All of the money, that is how much they cost...
     
  4. ChestersMomma

    ChestersMomma Senior Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2008
    Messages:
    8,961
    Likes Received:
    18,549
    Amen to that!
     
    Alsosusieq2 likes this.
  5. katherine katie

    katherine katie Registered

    Joined:
    May 27, 2018
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Monthly costs would include hay, grain/feed, water, manure removal (if you do not have means to take care of it or spread it yourself), insurance, supplements if needed, farrier work. These costs are all very dependent on where you are located. Hay, for example, is much more costly in certain parts of the US than others.
     
  6. Garfield70

    Garfield70 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2012
    Messages:
    4,924
    Likes Received:
    8,825

    Then you need two horses because keeping a horse without any other horse company is animal cruelty, you would deny the horse something essential for it's psychological well being.

    Plus, as a beginner, you should board at a good barn with trainer lessons and supervision.
     
  7. foxtrot

    foxtrot Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2013
    Messages:
    2,470
    Likes Received:
    8,723
    Google says:

    "Responses to a horse-ownership survey from the University of Maine found that the average annual cost of horse ownership is $3,876 per horse, while the median cost is $2,419. That puts the average monthly expense anywhere from $200 to $325 – on par with a car payment."

    Seems about right if you're being frugal...

    Hay is the main expense. Feed is optional for most horses, vet & farrier are pricey but not a constant thing--hay is the constant. You need hay and lots of it every day of the year.

    Right now I'm paying $7 for 50 lb bales. A 1,000 lb horse averages 20 lbs of hay a day. So one of my $7 bales would last a 1,000lb horse for 2 1/2 days. That means I'd need 12 bales a month which is $84. That's on the super frugal side though, many horses need more hay than that and bales can be way pricier than $7. So estimate at least $100 a month in hay. Average cost of a bag of grain is $20-$30 so if you give grain the cost shoots way up.

    I don't necessarily think it's the worst thing for a teen to keep a horse on their own property like some posters on this thread, it's what I grew up doing and wouldn't trade the experience for the world. But you do need to make sure you have someone to help teach you so you don't get hurt. Since your profile says you're 14 your parents are going to be paying for the bulk of this--which is fine if they're willing as long as you make sacrifices elsewhere. When I was a kid/teen I gave up on going to movies, buying new video games, taking up expensive hobbies, getting the latest gadgets, going on vacations, etc to help pay for the horses.

    It IS technically possible to keep a horse on your own property without paying exorbitant fees but that's in the best case scenario when the horse is healthy and you don't need to make huge repairs or buy new equipment/fencing/etc. And usually with horses the best case scenario only exists about 5% of the time lol.
     
    Alsosusieq2 likes this.
  8. ChestersMomma

    ChestersMomma Senior Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2008
    Messages:
    8,961
    Likes Received:
    18,549
    Stall kept or pasture? I board so I have no clue but I can’t imagine mine putting down that much per day. He’s only in his stall from spring- fall for breakfast and dinner but there is a hay feeder in the pasture. Genuinely curious bc I rarely see the herd at it unless they are waiting to be let in or up for a drink!
     
  9. foxtrot

    foxtrot Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2013
    Messages:
    2,470
    Likes Received:
    8,723
    That's if hay is 100% of the horse's ration, such as if it's on a dry lot or kept stalled. They say to feed 1-2% (some people say 2.5%) of the horse's body weight in hay--so 20lbs of 1000 is 2%. My minis are down to 1% and still fat. :eek:

    But when figuring out how much hay to have on hand, it's always good to pick the worst case scenario!
     
    Alsosusieq2 and ChestersMomma like this.
  10. CJ

    CJ Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2004
    Messages:
    12,116
    Likes Received:
    6,268
    Id agree thats about what it cost to keep my 2 Boys, who were pretty low maintenance and I boarded self care, getting my own feed and doing the work myself. Brief brushes with full care (2x) were @$300/ mo, one place a lil beat but (fed) good and the other pretty, painted, and worst place I ever stayed (fed short).
    After that doing self care was worth the effort, and peace of mind knowing it was done/ right, and cheaper. Even when it meant 2 hours on a snowy road to complete a drive that usually took 20 mins. They were fed, in, pj'd, whatever they Needed done..
    The vet & farrier were $100+- per a couple times a year, shots, barefoot trims, and luckily not many emergencies.
     
    Alsosusieq2 and foxtrot like this.

Share This Page