Losing Teeth?

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by Alyssa Hughes, Jun 5, 2018.

  1. Alyssa Hughes

    Alyssa Hughes Full Member

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    My two, almost three year old has a loose tooth. His top right front is loose. Is this normal? He didn't whack it on anything, so it is naturally becoming loose. These are not his teeth. I just used the photo for a reference.
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    Last edited: Jun 5, 2018
  2. Faster Horses

    Faster Horses Senior Member

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    Totally normal.
     
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  3. Alyssa Hughes

    Alyssa Hughes Full Member

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    Thank goodness! He's been getting hurt so much lately I was like noooooo not again! I knew they lost teeth I just didn't know exactly which ones when.
     
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  4. slc

    slc Senior Member

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  5. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    They loose the two middle up and down in front, first. The last two are the little corner teeth around 3yo, dependent on the horse.

    Then you will have the molars loosing their baby caps. 2 1/2 to 3yo. Don't be surprised when your horse's jaw suddenly seems larger than normal and his mouth small for his head. That signals the loosing the caps time. You may even find those gnarly looking caps in or around feed buckets, troughs, or water buckets.

    Fun times~!! :LOL:. And horses can be a little fussy about haltering and/ or leading when their caps are coming loose. You need to have a dentist out to check for wolf teeth before any bitting is done or if he has trouble chewing when he is losing caps.
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2018
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  6. Alyssa Hughes

    Alyssa Hughes Full Member

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    When exactly should I get a equine dentist out? After he's lost them or during loosing them? I will have to find one around here... I'll have to call my vet and see if she does it or knows someone who does.
     
  7. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    The day you go outside, look at his head and go: “Oh my gosh~!! His cheekbones grew over night and his mouth looks itty bitty~!!“
    :rofl:
    You will know because this is what triggers the permanent molars to erupt, when the Cheek bone starts growing.
     
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  8. ginster

    ginster Senior Member

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    Horses should generally get their teeth checked once or twice a year...maybe more often of there is something problematic going on..
     
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  9. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    The equine dentist should be out once year (twice if you can afford it) while the young horse is losing teeth and having new teeth come in(at least during age 1-4). First of all to just do routine maintenance (baby teeth wear very quickly so the teeth can get sharp points or get misaligned very quickly). And to make sure any 'caps' are being shed normally. One of my horses had had a cap on an incisor that did not shed normally. When I got him at 4, his teeth were already messed up. It was impossible for me to remove the cap. The dental vet came in and did it, but it had a permanent effect on the alignment of his incisor(front) teeth.
     
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  10. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    A cap being retained has NO affect on the front teeth.
    Horses chew, grinfd their food, side to side, not front to back. Not possible for a molar which grinds left to right, to distort the growth or nipping ability, up and down movement, of the incisors.

    If your colt has no issues with his teeth, you just have the vet do a cursory exam when he gets shots. NO NEED to call an equine dentist to attend to a colt who has a good bite, no mouth issues, and is eating fine, UNTIL, his caps start to shed.
     
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