looking into having my mare spayed, would like opinions

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by Rachel1786, Feb 9, 2018.

  1. Rachel1786

    Rachel1786 Senior Member

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    I searched the board, but the most recent thread I found on the topic was from 2012.
    Has anyone here had their mare(or know a mare) that has been spayed(the more recently the better).
    What behaviors was the mare exhibiting before being spayed to warrent it being done?
    Did the behavior change after the surgery?
    What did the procedure entail?
    I assume it needs to be done at a clinic, how long did the mare need to stay at the hospital, how long was the rehab?
    How much did the surgery cost?

    After I get my tax return, I'm going to have the vet out to do some hormone tests and discuss her behavior. A friend of mine suggested regumate however I don't want to handle something so dangerous, and its so expensive. Spaying I'm sure would be cheaper in the long run.
     
  2. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    There is no guarantee that spaying will help behavior problems. For one, some mares' behavior is worse when they're not in heat, not cycling, and spaying puts them permanently into that mode. Thus it is possible that spaying can make the behavior worse.

    Regumate is not dangerous nor expensive. Wear gloves when handling it and develop a procedure that minimizes our exposure to it.

    But....regumate is not a panacea either. It is quite often given INSTEAD OF finding out what's wrong and treating that appropriately. That can wind up being very expensive indeed.

    But in fact, discussing either regumate or spaying is at this point way jumping the gun. Please, please, please start with making an appointment with a vet first, and getting a diagnosis fro that vet.

    Online, you'll be told that the horse needs a special supplement, obviously has ulcers, don't bother to scope, just give it omeprazole, and you'll waste time and money and delay appropriate treatment.

    The best thing you can do is get an appointment with a vet, and let the vet to conduct the tests he or she feels are needed to arrive at a diagnosis.

    Then discuss with that same vet appropriate treatments for what the diagnosis is.

    Mares have had 'bad behavior' that some one felt would be remedied by spaying or regumate, for things as diverse as static electricity, kidney stones, Cushing Syndrome, ulcers, and tumors. Most of these things will not be addressed by regumate or spaying. Please start by getting a diagnosis.

    And too, keep in mind that the 'bad behavior' can also be due to training, problems with tack and other causes as well.....like incorrect feeding. And temperament. And lack of exercise.....
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2018
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  3. Rachel1786

    Rachel1786 Senior Member

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    Like I said, I plan on having the vet out once I get my tax return, my vet clinic specializes in reproductive health, obviously I'm not just going to call them and say "I want my mare spayed", I'm going to have them do the tests they deem necessary. My mares behavior is very stallion like at times, she has very difficult heat cycles (and is a lot worse when she is in heat) and has even been coming into heat in the winter(which is new this year). She does have a history of ulcers, but her symptoms aren't typical of when her ulcers flare up.
    I'm basically at my wits end with her behavior, and if the vet thinks spaying her in the answer, I want to know what to expect before hand.
     
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  4. mooselady

    mooselady Senior Member

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    SLC why are you always so quick to say talk to the vet, when the OP has already stated that they are going to have the vet out and discuss options?

    There is nothing wrong with doing research and asking for personal experience before talking to the vet......I mean the OP isn't likely to get out the carving knife and start on her own surgery there.....

    I get it, I spoke to people about knee replacements before I ever got to see the surgeon and talk to him about it....so when he suggested it was my best route, at least I had some idea what is in store.
     
  5. uncanny580

    uncanny580 Senior Member

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    I know someone that had their mare spayed.

    One ovary ended up being HUGE compared to the other. The mare had been acting studly and was wilde and overweight and cresty. It took a while after surgery but she is back to looking normal and is not wild anymore.

    That person chose to do it vaginally, instead of an incision through the side, and it is wayyy higher risk to do it that way. The price was more to do it through the side, but for piece of mind that is what I would choose. Someone else in the area had it done the same way and ended up losing her mare.
     
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  6. Kristal H

    Kristal H Senior Member

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    Spaying mates is complicated and risky.... it should only be done if spaying is the only alternative to fix the issue.

    I personally have had great success with my Repo Vet in marbeling mares after they have been fully examined to rule out infection, tumors and such. We had one mare that was marbled for over 15 seasons. Every time this topic comes up on this site people who don't understand or have never actually had a mare marbled will tell you horror stories about mares that were marbled by an idiot and not followed or seasonally have the marble removed.

    I do think there are dangers, especially to young women in handeling these hormones everyday.

    If I had another mate that was constantly spraying urine, aggressive, and sensitive with her cycle I would not hesitate to marble again.... after a complete GYN exam including US and BX.
     
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  7. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Actually it sounded like her mind was pretty made up already, spaying, the vet was going to be a chat only, to 'discuss hormones' not to run diagnostics. There is a difference.

    Why do I always? Because so many people seem to think they can decide on a treatment without a vet, without getting a diagnosis, and a diagnosis involves a vet and doing some tests.

    What'll she get told here? That the horse has ulcers, just like everyone else who comes here gets told. No don't get the vet out, don't scope, just give her ulcer medication. What worries me about these online fetes is the person goes out and buys $1000 of ulcer med, gives it to the horse, that's the end of the person's budget.

    I prefer people get a diagnosis. From a vet. By the vet running diagnostics and finding out what it actually is. Maybe it's ulcers. Fine then. The problem is it's not always ulcers.

     
  8. GotaDunQH

    GotaDunQH Senior Member

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    Depending on what type of behavior your mare is exhibiting (aggressive etc), talk to your vet about a hormone placement via needle in the neck. I owned a dun gelding who was aggressive, had stud like behavior at times, and was just cranky. My vet placed a "capsule" right under the skin in his neck which turned him into a pussycat! It's something (I can't for the life of me remember the name) that is also used on cows, but approved for use in horses. It worked on him.....
     
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  9. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    Yes.
     
  10. Rachel1786

    Rachel1786 Senior Member

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    After her shanigans today, I just might consider spaying her myself :rofl:...obviously I'm kidding(because you know SLC will think I'm serious)
    Thanks, her behavior has been getting stedily worse, I think she acts studly (I've never been around a stallion, so I have no first hand experience to compare her behavior to a stud) and has been a spaz, if the other mare isn't in sight, she completely looses her mind. She's always been buddy sour, but its come to a whole new level.

    Thanks, I've heard mixed opinions on marbling, but its definitely something I would do if the vet suggested it. I should ask her previous owners how her behavior was when she was pregnant.
    The thought of handing the hormones daily would not be something I'd want to do, I'm a clutz, I know I would eventually end up getting it on me.

    Actually I said "test hormones and discuss behavior" as in, diagnostics to see if her hormone levels are out of wack and some kind of treatment is necessary.
    Spaying is going to cost the most money up front. If that is what the vet suggests, I want to be prepared, which means knowing what the procedure entails and its cost. I may not even be able to afford to have the surgery done. I am in no way calling the vet telling them I want them to do an expensive surgery which may not be necessary. BUT, if the vet runs tests and says there is a darn good reason to spay her, and there is a good chance that it will help her become a happier, more normal horse, then heck yes, I will do my best to come up with the money to do it!

    Thanks, she's just a bit psychotic:crazy: :rolleyez:, she has difficult heat cycles, and is now cycling in winter, squirting, squealing, body slamming fences and walls when she's away from the other mare. I'm just so over her behavior, I've had her almost 8 years(She'll be 21 this June) and while she's always been tough when in heat, she's never been in heat in the winter, and never been so difficult to handle on the ground
     
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