Long distance hauling

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by turnnburnlynx, Aug 8, 2017.

  1. turnnburnlynx

    turnnburnlynx Senior Member

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    Hi all, I recently bought a stud colt who I will be picking up in 2 months, he will be a weanling (5 months) when I get him. I've never hauled a horse as far as I'm hauling this dude (1400 miles)

    What all do you guys do for hauling ?

    This is my plan....
    Straw or shavings in the trailer, take out center divider so it is a box stall for the little guy, bringing a few buckets of water from where he is coming from, free choice hay in front of him. Stopping every 6 hours for an hour or two to give him a rest and give him water.

    And my other question is, since he is coming from a warmer climate, he will need to probably have a blanket, so that will be accessible if he needs it.

    What do you all think?
     
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  2. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Sounds good but I wouldn't blanket as he could get a leg caught.
     
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  3. endurgirl

    endurgirl Senior Member

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    Where is he going? I wouldn't worry about a blanket either, he'll be started his winter coat by then anyway.

    When I brought my weanling home 1000 miles, she rode up front of a 4 horse slant load, with 3 other horses. We stopped and ate and allowed the horses to rest. She rode very well (the trailer had a camera so we were able to watch her).
     
  4. LoveTrail

    LoveTrail Senior Member

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    Just have your trailer less vented once you get to somewhere where the temps are lower than the low temps from the state he is coming from.
     
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  5. tlwidener

    tlwidener Senior Member

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    I'd just hit it hard. We did a long trip in March. Hubby and I took turns driving. We only stopped for fuel, bathroom, and food. We offered water when we fueled, about every five hours. We never stopped for more than an hour.

    Hay net was kept full.

    We didn't unload until we got her home.

    I probably wouldn't blanket; I'd just close the trailer down if it's cold.
     
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  6. turnnburnlynx

    turnnburnlynx Senior Member

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    I should have verified, he won't get a blanket on the trip! I feel he might need one once he gets home!

    He is going from Georgia to Colorado.
    Thank you all for the information! I'm excited !!
     
  7. LoveTrail

    LoveTrail Senior Member

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    Sometimes October gets an Indian Summer and with our low humidity, it doesn't feel as cold as it would from the a humid state like Georgia either.

    Congrats on the new horse.
     
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  8. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    No blanket in trailer. Close vents/windows as necessary. Hauling him loose allows him to get his head down and sneeze and clear his nasal passages, that's very important and can prevent him from picking up an illness.

    I would give him mineral oil(the point of mineral oil is that it won't get digested and will just lube up his gut and prevent, hopefully, any colic), 8 hrs before departure, and take several bales of hay of what he's currently eating with you.

    Water in buckets- the water is going to slosh all over. Bucket cover might help(they don't always stay on) and you take it out every 5-6 hrs and offer it to him. Of course if you bring a tank to put his water in the tank itself imparts a smell/flavor and horse might not drink it once it has the new...'flavor'. Another approach some people use is they soak the hay for 8 hrs before they depart...that helps to add water to the horse's gut. Boss had me put the hay in bags, put in the truck bed, THEN add the water to the bag and close the bag, take flakes of out and feed a flake or 2 every 5 hrs.
     
  9. turnnburnlynx

    turnnburnlynx Senior Member

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    I don't think I'll be able to do the mineral oil realistically, but I will bring buckets with lids, and will def. Soak the hay if that is suggested.
    Are there suggestions for either straw or shavings?

    Do you all suggest shipping boots ?
     
  10. greenpaintpony

    greenpaintpony Senior Member

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    All long distance haulers I've worked with have nixed boots and wraps of any sort (except maybe bell boots, if you're worried about them catching themselves). They were always more concerned about something coming undone and getting tangled than any support or protection boots might add.

    We also did tubed electrolytes every day (I think am and pm) to help make sure they're drinking and staying hydrated.

    Def haul loose if possible, and I think I've only ever hauled in shavings, but mostly because that's what was available.
     
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