Laminitis/Founder Question

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by Smartee Pants, Aug 17, 2018.

  1. Smartee Pants

    Smartee Pants Senior Member

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    A little background - My boy came in slightly off on his left front back on May 5th. He was overweight and underworked. I had, about 2 weeks prior, taken him off all sweet feed and started him on a ration balancer as he had 24 hr access to pasture and hay. Two days later, he was off on the right as well. Had the vet out immediately. We did radiographs and blood work done and he was put on stall rest with deep bedding.

    He was diagnosed IR but not Cushings and laminitic with 2 deg rotation. Good solid feet. He was started on Thyro-L to help lose weight and he's also on Remission, Ration Balancer and hay. He was doing great - no pain in the feet and losing weight. The end of July he began going out in an "almost" dry lot with very little grass and a muzzle - wearing boots. He did this a couple hours per day for just over a week. Overnight - he went VERY lame in his left front. Put on bute and stopped the turnout. Vet was called immediately. He had a couple very rough days - then began getting better (less lame but still lame). Vet came out on Monday (a few days after the lameness began). All vitals were good. She said I'd been doing everything right and didn't think that it should be another laminitic episode. Thinking possibly an abscess brewing. Though no heat, swelling, soreness anywhere, etc.

    Touched base with the vet this morning. Still no obvious abscess and still lame but even less so. We've decided to give it the weekend with soaking in Epsom salts and see how he is Monday. If not better and/or no abscess showing we're going to pull radiographs again.

    Now - the question - I have a friend at the same farm whos horse came up very lame in both fronts. Vet came out and pulled blood. Horse is IR and overweight. Didn't do radiographs. Was put on Thyro-L and told to put shoes back on him. He's still living out 24/7 with grass and hay no muzzle and he's fine? Another friends horse that was known to have foundered and was laminitic - no radiographs - no blood work - stall for 30 days to lose weight - new shoes and she's back to lessons and showing?

    What am I doing wrong by trying to do the right thing? Do I just throw shoes on him and roll? Of course I won't - but it makes me wonder!

    edited to add: He had front shoes on until he came up lame and has been barefoot since - using hoof boots with pads during turnout.
     
  2. ginster

    ginster Senior Member

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    Could be an abscess and it sounds like you're trying everything to keep your horse healthy.
    each horse is different. The overweight horse has just been lucky so far.
    @gaitedboomer has experience wit h IR horses, I think @LoveTrail as well?
    What ration balancer are you feeding? Are you soaking his hay/ had it tested?
     
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  3. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    Unluck of the draw obviously. Sounds like you've been doing all you can. Good luck on the rads. ;)
     
  4. Smartee Pants

    Smartee Pants Senior Member

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    He's on Empower Topline Balance by Nutrena. The only thing I'm not doing is soaking and no testing. They have a variety of hay there so no testing. He's lost quite a bit of weight and almost to his optimal weight considering he gets no exercise. Vet seemed to think with everything else that wouldn't be too much of a problem.
     
  5. Smartee Pants

    Smartee Pants Senior Member

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    Thanks!
     
  6. ginster

    ginster Senior Member

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    Okay, from what I found the Nutrena has an NSC of 14%.
    What kind of hay are you feeding? I think I'd rather be safe than sorry and start soaking it.
     
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  7. doublelranch

    doublelranch Senior Member

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    Does he still have a cresty neck? Not knocking any feed, but I had an IR horse on Nutrena Empower Balance. She just wouldn't loose the cresty neck and was chronically sore/laminitic with absolutely no pasture. I switched to hay pellets and loose vit/min in place of any grain during feedtime. She lost her cresty neck, and her feet haven't been sore since. Every horse is different. When trying to get to that happy medium, sometimes you just have to go to the bare minimum. Our air ferns might not need any of the extras.
     
  8. paval

    paval Senior Member

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    Try this stuff instead of soaking in epson salt bath. I even got my trimmer/farrier carrying a couple jars for clients now. It beats soaking and I haven't had it fail in drawing an abscess open, usually 3 days. Plus soaking the feet softens the wall and lessens support.
    This stuff comes in a jar or in a bottle of gel. Both work the same. If hoof testers indicate the pain is in the sole, I pack the hoof with the epson salt poultice, then some cotton and wrap hoof in duck tape (keep tape off coronary band)... if I think it's going to blow at the coronary band, I just rub the poultice from just below the hoof line, over and above coronary band. It beats soaking... and some horse are a pain to keep a foot in a tub/bucket or don't like soaking boots.
    [​IMG]
     
  9. Smartee Pants

    Smartee Pants Senior Member

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    Thanks everyone!

    The Empower Topline Balance shows a Guaranteed Analysis of NSC - maximum of 5% it also indicates for use in "Horses requiring nutritional support for insulin resistance or Cushing’s Syndrome". He has lost his cresty neck and fat deposits. He is almost where he needs to be weight wise.

    Saturday evening (with no bute in the AM) he almost bolted out of his stall. His foot felt much better to him though still no abscess showing. He was tender at his heel bulb. I soaked him again and then packed him with Magic Cushion. Again - no bute and was walking great this morning! I'm debating if I'm going to remove the packing this evening or give it until tomorrow. I'm curious to see if anything burst.
     
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  10. LoveTrail

    LoveTrail Senior Member

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    Still too high of starch, 9%, in the grain for a metabolic horse especially with founder/laminitis issues. Go to this website to figure out a better grain for your horse. Equine Cushing's and Insulin Resistance Group Inc.

    Left front and right hind issues also are a symptom of hind gut ulcers which seems to be common with IR horses that get too much starch. That's what happened with my IR horse. He had physical reasons to be, but the hind gut made them worse and possibly contributed to it.
     
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