Knock-kneed and crooked-legged foals

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by SkipaJo Cowgirl, May 14, 2005.

  1. SkipaJo Cowgirl

    SkipaJo Cowgirl Senior Member+

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    With all the babies being born, I was wondering, who has or had foals that started out with hoof not landing squarely, causing the leg to land crooked - but with time, was able to grow out of it without any intervention...resulting in straight legs by weanling or 2 yrs old?

    Who needed to intervene with the legs; what method did you use; did it work for the foal?

    Please post pics of your foal (before/after)where it started out crooked or knock-kneed but ended up straight/crooked anyways.:)
     






  2. SkipaJo Cowgirl

    SkipaJo Cowgirl Senior Member+

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    I guess I am posting this b/c I would like more opinions on the subject ...

    For example, If you look at this foal from behind, you can see that she is turned in at the knees...(vet confirmed). She also toes out, but this pic doesn't show this very well...thus, she appears to have crooked legs...b/c she was born in march, I'll have to wait to see how she turns out in the months to come.

    Does anyone here actually own a horse who came out with crooked legs and they self corrected? Or does anyone here own and ride a horse who has crooked legs?
     

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    Last edited: May 14, 2005
  3. AQHA_Gizmo

    AQHA_Gizmo Senior Member+

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    Well the owner of our old boarding barn had a colt who was born with a crooked right leg. We no longer board there, but as we were leaving, I believe he began to grow out of it and it straightened out. It only took a few weeks too! SO...it can happen!
     
  4. SkipaJo Cowgirl

    SkipaJo Cowgirl Senior Member+

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    That's good A.G. This foal was 6 weeks old and there were no signs at that time of her straightening out....but, I would imagine they straighten out on their own time schedule...if they were meant to be straight at all.

    Has anyone else experienced this...and have success stories to tell?
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2005
  5. I LUV BESS

    I LUV BESS Senior Member+

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    um... Pippa Funnells Primmores Pride has turned in toes, but when he is moving, as they touch the floor, they are ok. As you can see, it does not affect his performance at all...
     
  6. spyro1

    spyro1 Senior Member+

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    I'm not a vet or farrier, BUT in SOME cases, constant farrier work can help to correct certain problems. I would talk this over with your vet and farrier and see if your boy is a cadidate for this type of correction. I had an appy colt a few years ago who was toes out behind. My farrier did some corrective trimming and drastically reduced the problem.
     
  7. SummerGold

    SummerGold Senior Member

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    Unless the foal can't walk properly (as in hurts its legs scraping because the hooves are turned up, etc.), most people I know leave their legs alone for a while unless a vet recommends differently. It is like human babies; most are pigeon-toed (turned-in toes) until they are 2 or 3 naturally, but it straightens itself out as they grow and learn to walk and run, etc. Of course, horses take less time than that as they walk from birth:wink: , but the principal is the same. The foal is all scrunched and folded up inside the mare, so the legs being all jumbled is pretty normal until they really learn to walk, trot, run, etc. and develop good muscle and balance. As I understand it, 90% of foals straighten out just fine on their own so unless your vet is worried about your little baby, no reason for you to be:wink:.
     
  8. giddyupgal73

    giddyupgal73 Senior Member

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    When my Paint was born he was very knock kneed and his pasterns were sunk down a bit. We gave him a vitamin shot which helped the sunk down pasterns. but the knock kneed didn't go away until he was about 3 months old. His chest had to catch up, but once his chest filled in his knees were perfectly straight. He did have a tendency to point out his hooves, but corrective trimming cured that.
     
  9. stdbred88

    stdbred88 Senior Member

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    almost all babies are born with crooked legs. i was just reading an article in "The Horse" magazine which confirms this. it said less than 10% of foals are born with perfectly shaped limbs. most grow out of it, but if ours dont by about 7 months they go off to have surgery or get corrective shoeing because they start race training at 18 months. they usually have a procedure called perostial stripping, which is just stripping off the outermost layer of the bone which is responsible for the growing of the bone- the perostium. for example if the leg as you are looking at it curves to the right[looks like this: ) but obviously not as severe] then you would strip the right side because that side is growing faster than the left and causing the leg to curve. it works 90% of the time. corrective shoeing (an extension shoe) for the same type of leg would be added to the right side. the shoeing is less of an extreme compared to surgery. the filly i have now has a leg problem, i believe the vet said its in her stifle...he back legs twist as she walks but its not very severe. she will need shoes as i begin to ride her more because the twisting wears down the back hooves faster. i would ask your vet his or her opinion on your foals legs, see what he or she thinks about shoeing or surgery. if he/she's not worried than its likely that you have no need to be worried either.
     
  10. Blistering Winds

    Blistering Winds Senior Member+

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    Yes, many babies are born crooked and all out of wack. By the time they are 3-5 months old, you start seeing a difference. if a difference is being seen, then let things continue. If no change, or worsening, then intervene.

    Always work with your vet AND farrier. Together, they can help you decide if it is a growing phase or an actual conformational issue.
     






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