Kineton noseband

Discussion in 'Tack & Equipment' started by TBnut, Oct 30, 2008.

  1. TBnut

    TBnut Full Member

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    Has anyone used this noseband? I read that it is not severe--it just diverts pressure from the bars of the mouth to the nose when a horse starts pulling. It doesn't sound harsh. I don't want anything harsh. My TB gets to pulling when we jump.
     






  2. luvs2ride79

    luvs2ride79 Senior Member+

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    They are more popular in the UK. Maybe some of our UK or Aussie members can chime in about them ;).

    Did you see one in the SmartPak or Dover catalog? I get both and remember seeing one.
     
  3. txgray

    txgray Senior Member+

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    I used to use one on my horse that pulled. It was either ride him in a pelham or a dr bristol w/ kineton, and when I was eventing him the pelham was just too many reins to keep track of. I thought it worked pretty well on him, but I'm sure like anything else it depends on the horse.
     
  4. kb1gra

    kb1gra Senior Member+

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    I've had them be fantastic for horses who get heavy in the hand and pull. Since the effect of leaning on the reins puts pressure on the nose, the horse is forced to pull against himself.

    However, I have had horses rear and almost flip backwards when they felt the pressure. I wouldn't use it on a horse who is sensitive around the face.

    I use them all the time, though, and I think they're a great tool instead of just bitting up a puller.
     
  5. TBnut

    TBnut Full Member

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    When my horse gets excited he pulls like a freight train and I feel like he doesn't respect me. I sure hope he doesn't rear....he will hop up and down if something ticks him off (like dressage!) He is not sensitive around the face. Can you encourage bending with this set up or is it harder for them to bend with this?? I think I am going to try this. I want to introduce him to eventing this next year and I DON'T want to bit him up! Also, what are the guidelines for fitting one? Should you be able to fit a finger under the leather piece over the nose or is it based on how it lays with the bit?
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2008
  6. kb1gra

    kb1gra Senior Member+

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    It depends on which style you have:

    the metal loop style should be fitted so that the bit sits just slightly off the bars of the mouth when there's no rein pressure. The higher it sits, the more pressure will be applied on the nose when you pull the reins.

    I recommend fitting it, and applying rein pressure in hand to see how much effect it has and to get the horse used to rein pressure.

    I don't recommend using one all the time, especially not for dressage work, as they can encourage a horse to learn to drop behind the bit as an evasion of the nose pressure.

    There is another style that's often used for young horses who are sensitive in the mouth which basically is a plain noseband with half a flash that buckles onto the bit and lifts it. This applies a slightly more disperse nose pressure and can be used with a STANDING martingale (never a running, which acts on the reins) which is nice. I tend to use that one more than the others but a straight kineton is nice for cross country.
     
  7. flying ponies

    flying ponies Registered

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    kineton nosebands can be good for horses that get too heavy in the mouth. all it does is divert pressure from the mouth to the nose, making it kind of like a hackamore. it should be adjusted so that the bit sits in the horse's mouth like it usually would with normal rein pressure, so that the noseband only comes into play when the horse is pulling badly. good luck!
     
  8. kb1gra

    kb1gra Senior Member+

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    actually, that's too loose. It's not like a martingale, when you have the noseband on, it should be fitted so that any rein pressure will engage the noseband to some degree. The idea of it is set on the horse not being able to pull at ALL, not just pull some until it reaches a limit. So, it should be fitted so that the bit is lifted very slightly off the bars of the mouth such that any rein pressure will engage the noseband. The higher you set it off the bars, the more pressure will be diverted to the nose, but the loosest you want it set is so that the bit is sitting normally.

    In fact now that I think about it, if you don't set it so that it is lifting the bit at least somewhat at rest, it would never come into play at all because rein pressure would never be such that the bit would be lifted. It has to be fitted so that any rein pressure diverts to the nose, with how much being defined by how high in the mouth the bit is lifted.
     
  9. firegurl979

    firegurl979 Senior Member+

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    can you use it for jumping??
     
  10. kb1gra

    kb1gra Senior Member+

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    Sure,if you know what you're doing, a lot of jumpers wear them.

    However, do not use it with a running martingale and be judicious about your use of it if you're not 100% confident in your ability to not interfere with the horse while he's wearing it.
     
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