Just for fun - worst training advise you ever got

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by palogal, Nov 4, 2017.

  1. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    That is one of the more completely irrational things you will get told about training horses. Actually it's fairly reliable for making more nervous horses go completely bonkers.
     
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  2. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    What, supposedly, does a bull do when he doesn't 'respect' someone?

    When I've seen bulls charge at people, they usually look quite desperate, like they are doing it in self-defense because their herd or territory is threatened. Maybe start a thread in off-topic about bull behavior?

     
  3. Dona Worry

    Dona Worry Senior Member

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    Kill you.
    Bulls WILL in fact 'turn mean'. It's a hormone thing. But beating them into submission repeatedly will just paint a bigger target on your back for when they do.
    Also, there is a ton of subtle signs for when a bull is reaching that point in their life, and you sell them the moment you see one.
     
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  4. bobo and horses

    bobo and horses Senior Member

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    Dona Worry knows for sure! We had an acquaintance who trusted his Holstein bull way too much. It killed him, and guarded his body and wouldn’t let anyone near. State Police finally killed him so they could retrieve the body.

    I was very young at the time, but I remember my father decided no more bulls on our farm, he was worried not only for our workers but us, as children. He went to AI after that. They are good until they aren’t.
     
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  5. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I guess this means the worst training advice is simply, 'get mad'? Then after this post, someone else said, 'I'm sure this is bad advice but why is it bad advice?'

    And in fact, another post was 'turn your heels out and squeeze really hard with your legs' and that was bad advice too.

    Well....occasionally....sometimes...once in a while...'bad advice' is 'good advice.'

    For example, if the rider's heels are constantly in the horse and his knees are sticking out, with a big 'air space' under his knees(daylight between saddle and leg'), 'turn your heels out and squeeze really hard with your legs'....MIGHT be a good correction exercise. For a little while.

    At the same time any correction exercise can be overdone, over-repeated, and then start causing its own problems. If the rider constantly turns his heels out and squeezes his legs once the exercise has served its purpose, he'll create new problems.

    And 'get mad' might be about the ONLY thing an instructor can say to an individual who sits passively, doing nothing. 'Get mad' might, for a 'corrective period', be better than sitting passively, unable to decide what to do or afraid to do anything.

    Sometimes, 'Hey, Sparkie is being BAD! He's ignoring your leg! You need to get mad and do something about that!' might be the only thing that gets through to a person with paralysis of the arms, legs and seat.

    Obviously, 'corrective measures' are things we can't just adopt as a way of life. We can't just be constantly bubbling over in a fury at the horse. We can't canter forever with the left arm lifted over our heads, or our legs held entirely off the saddle and horse ('thigh stretcher' correction exercise). But some of this 'bad advice' is actually not meant as a 'lifestyle' but as a temporary correction.

    Clearly, there are other things that aren't ever even good 'correction exercises'. 'Waggle his head right and left real fast!' still isn't a sensible way to 'get a horse on the bit'.

    Sometimes we have to do less than elegant things to fix a bad habit, or cope with a really big issue.
     
  6. TallOak10

    TallOak10 Full Member

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    I have a lot of stupid things to choose from -- the one that comes to mind right now -- was to "use draw reins to get him on the bit faster." You ride the horse into the bit, with time and due diligence, you don't crank him into it.
     
  7. ChestersMomma

    ChestersMomma Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Worst training advice? Well when I was 15 and new to horse ownership, my horse had started bucking. Turns out it was a simple saddle fit issue as he was developing muscles he hadn’t used in years. In the meantime, however, my nonhorsey mom had gone to a local tax store to try to find some advice (bless her heart) and they had talked her into buying a tiedown, yes a tiedown, to fix his bucking problem. Thank God one of my 4h advisors stepped in on that.
     

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