Just for fun - worst training advise you ever got

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by palogal, Nov 4, 2017.

  1. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    Not training advice, but I couldn't find that dumbest thing thread. "You don't get on a horse on it's right side because they don't like you doing it". Just heard it recently.. Smh.
     
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  2. distancewilltel

    distancewilltel Full Member

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    I like my horses to be ok with mounting and dismounting from either side. I never even considered whether the horse liked it or not :ROFLMAO:
     
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  3. Binca

    Binca Senior Member

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    Same. I regularly dismount from the right instead of the left. My old man Josh is used to it. Ciarra I broke in myself so she was just trained that way and doesn't care. King the OTTB had a slight panic the first time I dismounted from the right. Shot sideways to the left and went all snorty and wide eyed (like this -->:eek:). :rofl: He is used to it now but I had to try hard not to laugh at his reaction the first time.
     
  4. Tana.love04

    Tana.love04 Full Member

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    But won't that just make him/her even more afraid o you?
     
  5. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Oh do you think the horse being afraid of the person would be a concern for a person who would do such a thing? They'd probably think it was great, awesome.

    Well I am going to share the information on these and similar techniques. No, I don't endorse any of these...'ideas.'

    The 'logic' of that, as it was ah....shared with me.... is that the horse keeps getting shot with the BB pellets until he runs into the barn. The person then shuts the barn gate or door and he has 'caught' the horse. Now he can put the horse in for the night or catch him in the smaller area inside the barn and tack him up and ride him...or whatever it is he plans to do.

    It need not be BB pellets, though. It could be buckshot or whatever. One fellow told me he used rock salt. I was on a big trail ride once, and I was jokingly saying that I could not catch a certain horse and he advised me to get a gun and load it with rock salt and shoot the horse. As a matter of animal welfare, obviously, I had to be sure to not shoot the horse in the eye, though that 'probably wouldn't hurt him anyhow' as the 'salt will dissolve.'

    One girl told me when her horse wouldn't come when called, her dad kept walking slowly around the field throwing a large rock hammer at the horse's head, and hitting him in the head, she, laughing uproariously, told me, 'until that horse's head looked like hamburger meat.' And when the horse ran into the barn, the hitting on the head with the hammer ended.

    She said that after that, all she had to do was bend down and pick up a rock, or act like she was picking up a rock, and the horse would turn and run to the barn and go inside the barn.

    Yeah...no. I'm not endorsing these methods. I'm explaining what the 'thought process' is behind them. They want to make the horse go into the barn. They aren't concerned about the horse being afraid of them.
     
  6. Tana.love04

    Tana.love04 Full Member

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    I definitely understand that and I'm pretty sure that's considered animal abuse or at least it should be. Your horse runs away from you because they clearly don't trust you or there is another problem with the relationship. It depends on the horse and rider.
     
  7. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    As I noted, I don't endorse these techniques.

    Generally, I call my horses from the pasture and they come running. If they don't, I walk out to where they are, put a halter and lead shank on them, and stand there for 1 - 1 1/2 minutes while they eat grass, which is why they don't run away when I try to catch them. They don't associate me catching them with having to stop eating grass.
     
  8. Zimalia

    Zimalia Senior Member

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    Keep in mind, this was not a trainer that told me to do this, but just a regular guy. Needless to say, I did not take his advice.

    When he found out I rode mostly studs, this man went out of his way to inform me that I should tie a heavy chain to a shovel handle, and beat the stallions several times a day till they went to their knees. I asked why? And he told me because I'm a woman, and those are studs and they would kill me one day! Hmm. Now why would a good minded horse that I have handled for years all of a sudden turn on me and try to kill me. He didn't have an answer.
    So no, my studs did not get the chain and shovel handle treatment.
    No this man was not a cowboy. FAR from it.
     
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  9. Dona Worry

    Dona Worry Senior Member

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    I received oddly similar advice about a bull running with my cows once. Big lazy lug, I ignored him, he ignored me, we got along famously, but a guy looking for cull cows decided to share the wisdom that the bull needed a real 'teaching' moment. This 'teaching' involved running him into the parlor where he'd be trapped and beating the snot out of him with a fence post, and shock him with a cattle prod, because 'bulls don't respect women'.

    Oddly enough, I never found any cull cows to send with this guy.
     
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  10. Dona Worry

    Dona Worry Senior Member

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    Advice I got today, in the context of not needing the trainer I could do it myself etc if only I would listen to the sage voice of experience this person offered...
    "Just leave her in a stall, and only take her out to work her. Soon she'll be more than happy to do whatever you want because it means she gets out of her stall for a while!"
    So put a sensitive, high-energy horse in solitary confinment 24/7, and call it a training technique. Right.
     

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