Jumping Pics! (We're getting higher)

Discussion in 'Critique My Horse' started by E90Style, Jul 10, 2017.

  1. E90Style

    E90Style Senior Member

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    Last week and this week. These all are taken at the canter pace.

    Tyler the pony. I've ridden him 3 times.
    Take off
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    Landing

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    Now this massive guy. First time I've ever ridden him. I think I over estimated how high he would raise his head.

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    Second lap around
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    Third lap around

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  2. E90Style

    E90Style Senior Member

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    I think I'm doing well considering two months ago I wasn't a jumper. :)
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2017
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  3. Pony123

    Pony123 Full Member

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    First off nice job! You've done a lot of work for not having jumped before two months ago! To work on your position, I would begin by finding the center of balance over your horse. You are jumping ahead of your pony which probably means you are anticipating the jump. I have a huge problem with that too...Scoot your butt back into the saddle and sink your heels down and let the horse jump. Also, as a release, I would grab some mane about halfway up the neck and keep your hands there so you can give your horse a release without having to worry about catching him in the mouth. In the pictures, there's not actually a release, you are pulling your hands into your lap. With a release, you'll find that the ponies will jump much better. Nice job and great riding!
     
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  4. E90Style

    E90Style Senior Member

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    Absolutely. I will keep this in mind for my next lesson. We trot around the arena for 10 minutes off and on in two point position and I keep my hands just in front of the saddle pads when we are trotting. I will stretch them up and grab mane for the next jump I soar across. Thank you!
     
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  5. Dona Worry

    Dona Worry Senior Member

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    Looking fantastic, you go lady! :cheerleader:
     
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  6. E90Style

    E90Style Senior Member

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    Thank you!!
     
  7. Pony123

    Pony123 Full Member

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    haha yeah I totally get it. You just have to remember that hands aren't going to always be fixed in the same place everytime and eventually you'll learn to adjust your hand position to what the horse is doing.
     
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  8. E90Style

    E90Style Senior Member

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    That makes sense!
     
  9. Friesiangirl

    Friesiangirl Senior Member

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    Your core and lower leg do not appear strong enough for your body to move with the horse as it should, it appears you are relying on your hands to "hold" yourself up meaning that you are ineffectual as a rider until you land and pick up your reins again. It also puts your center of gravity at liberty of where the horse's momentum is going, which can be very very bad in the event of a refusal. There is a methodology of "bridging" the reins which would give you the same security blanket, but with more stability and less risk.

    Bridging Your Reins Gives You (and your Horse) Security

    You appear to be halfway doing this in a few of these shots. But in doing this, you must remember that you cannot put your entire body onto that point, allow your core and legs to be your stability, by sinking the weight back onto them as well, while maintaining a slight 2-point.

    Think of it as adding another anchor to the horse, but not the only anchor. Your knees and ankles absorb the shock of the jump, and in the case of bridging the reins properly, you can also "absorb" the shock in a third place. You'll want slightly more rein if you intend to do this, to allow the horse range of motion over a fence.

    That being said, I see things I like here. You're looking up, you aren't throwing your entire upper body out in front of the horse as many do, despite being slightly ahead. This is a good foundation, because you want to learn to look forward, not down. For a number of reasons.

    I understand you are very eager to jump, and while if you were under me we'd be working on more flat work first to get your muscles and body control in a bit better shape, I know what I say here will not change your current program.

    So I will leave you this:
    Take the time to cherish the flat work. It will make you a better jumper in the long run. :)
     
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  10. E90Style

    E90Style Senior Member

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    That was a wonderful post and I thank you for taking the time to type all of that. I will absolutely read that entire article tonight as well as again before my lesson Saturday. One thing I want to add in regards to the refusal part and being ahead. I actually have on video, my second lesson, this happened at the trot. On the same pony in the first two pictures. Last second he refused the cross rail and even though it was only at the trot, my body was far enough forward to send me to hugging his neck.
     
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