Isoxsuprine for heel sore horse?

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by Maria L, Nov 17, 2018.

  1. Maria L

    Maria L Registered

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    I recently moved my 18 year old Swedish Warmblood/TB to Louisiana from Virginia and we have had some feet problems! This horse looks and acts like a 10 year old and is very sound. It's very humid and wet down here. I used the barn farrier and shoes kept coming off consistently and taking off his hoof with it (also he charges 120.00 for fronts only). I tried a new farrier and he did a terrible job as well. Went to yet another farrier and he is AWESOME, even showed up during my vet appointment. Recently, (3 weeks after I changed the farrier the first time) my horse has been very ouchy and not traveling the way he normally does. Barn manager said it was cause of the new farrier and claims he looks awful because I am not using her farrier. There has been a slow decline since hes been here though. Vet did a lameness exam and administered bute and Isoxsuprine and also recommended eggbar front shoes and normal back shoes as she concluded that he moves like a heel sore horse after lunging him. Hoof testing resulted in a reaction for the back and no reaction in the front although his heels are still recovering from before in the front. My gelding is never lame, usually wears two fronts and is very sound so this is a new challenge I am facing. I am not completely sure of this vet and barn manager but isn't it a little much to be administering isoxsuprine to a heel sore horse? I thought it was for foundering and navicular horses. Also, she didn't tell me she had prescribed isoxsuprine I was under the impression it was just bute and found out when I went to see how he was on supplements. He isn't necessarily lame but more on the side of not stepping up with his back and kind of off as well as not wanting to round and be on the bit which is how he normally travels. I feel as though it's arthritis setting in as well. What are your thoughts?
     
  2. DocsLglyBlonde

    DocsLglyBlonde Senior Member

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    Isoxsuprine is a vasodilator, used to increase hoof circulation and blood flow. The idea is for foundered horses with damaged laminae, and I would imagine horses needing more circulation to promote growth or healing, get more blood flow going to the hooves. That said, it is not that well researched for efficacy for the intended use. There's a lot of anectdotal support, but iffy and outdated research for use in horses. With that said, I used it for my mare after foundering, and she had fantastic results with recovery. There was of course a very multifactorial approach used, and I'm sure if the Isoxsuprine did help, it was not the most contributing factor, but it did not harm and I wouldn't hesitate to use it again in a similar situation. I think it's your decision ultimately, to weigh the pros and cons in your situation, and determine if you think it is worth it to try. Some vets seem much more happy to hand it out than others imo. I'd have a hard time putting a horse who doesn't even have conditions that the low evidence reseach has been on, on top of the evidence itself being pretty minimal. Just my opinion :)
     
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  3. RG NIGHT HEIR

    RG NIGHT HEIR Senior Member

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    My horse had heel pain.Farrier suggested to reverse the shoe so he had more roll over at the toe.The shoe sits further back,so my horse wears HOrZE bellboots 24/7.
    He is totally sound,no missteps or bracing for a painful step.Prefer corrective shoeing over medication
    Recommended to softer grounds .
     
  4. LoveTrail

    LoveTrail Senior Member

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    So you recently also changed barns? Maybe the ground is an issue for him. I had a horse bruise its heels at a week long horse show. And same with another friend. The ground was hard between arenas.

    I would also post photos of the feet for the members that know how a horse's feet should be done. I think there is a sticky at the beginning of this forum category on how to take those photos.
     
  5. tlwidener

    tlwidener Senior Member

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    Isoxsuorine doesn't do much.

    Got any hoof pics? Ground level from front and side and then solar shots would be good.

    Did your vet suggest x-rays? Kind of sounds like navicular symptoms. Heel pain can be caused by crappy trimming and shoeing...and can lead to inflammation and degradation over time.
     
  6. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Maria L, post: 8228024, member: 88913
    You're a little hard to follow. You say he's very sound, then that he's not, then that it's been a 'gradual decline' since you moved, then not that he's so much unsound as 'off.....not stepping up.....ouchy....'

    Let's agree to some terminology, okay? And let's try to get really specific about what you see. And when. And when it started. A video would be nice.

    And let's talk about what the horse is doing for activity daily, and how that's different from what he was doing in Va. Let's talk about footing in the pasture, paddock, and where you ride. How often does the horse get worked, what does he do. What's your experience level, how long have you had horse, etc. All the basics.

    What do these words mean to you? "unsound" vs "off" vs "ouchy" - what's the difference between the two?

    To avoid all the different definitions people give to 'off, unsound, uneven, ouchy, not stepping up,' I think of this in terms of 'gait abnormality.' The gaits are abnormal. With or without head bobbing, strides are not even, one or both hind legs not reaching forward the normal amount, ALL legs are not reaching forward the expected amount, both hocks not flexing and straightening out equally, one hip bobbing up and down more than the other, there is something we can see and describe specifically that looks wrong to us. Ok?

    I recently moved my 18 year old Swedish Warmblood/TB to Louisiana from Virginia......
    horse looks and acts like a 10 year old and is very sound.......I think you mean, "until now."

    barn farrier and shoes kept coming off consistently and taking off his hoof with it.......Okay, that's Guy A. How long did that go on for? How many shoeings did Guy A and Guy B do? How many times has Guy C (the good guy) shod the horse? What was the interval between each shoeing?

    a new farrier and he did a terrible job as well....Okay, that's Guy B.

    Went to yet another farrier and he is AWESOME, even showed up during my vet appointment....He really has to, since the horse is not taking...even strides.

    Recently, (3 weeks after I changed the farrier the first time) my horse has been very ouchy
    ....Okay. 3 weeks after Guy B did the horse's feet, he was 'ouchy.' His strides were not normal, in some way.

    Barn manager said it was cause of the new farrier....Does she have a rule stating you have to use her farrier? No? Then it's none of her business who you use. You don't tell her that, you just say very loudly, 'THAAAAAANKKKKS!" and ignore her comments.

    a slow decline since hes been here though.....You mean in Louisiana? Okay, but up there, you said he did not start having problems until 3 weeks after Guy B shod him....

    Vet did a lameness exam and administered bute and Isoxsuprine and also recommended eggbar front shoes and normal back shoes as she concluded that he moves like a heel sore horse after lunging him.....Did he longe the horse on a hard or soft surface? So no xrays were done? What's a lameness exam? Watch horse get longed? Did the vet do flexions? Nerve blocks? Were the shoes removed? Did Guy C trim or reset the shoes that day?

    Hoof testing resulted in a reaction for the back and no reaction in the front....So both hind feet reacted to hoof testers? Hoof tested applied where? Toes? Quarters? etc?

    My gelding is never lame,
    usually wears two fronts and is very sound so this is a new...Let's stick to 'abnormal strides.'

    isoxsuprine to a heel sore horse?.....It would be unusual. It's not actually clear that isox does anything for laminitic horses, either, though, that is given based on a theory that circulation is inadequate in laminitis. For the same reason, it's used for Navicular, - based on the theory that navicular is about inadequate circulation (i 'vascular in nature'). There are other theories about navicular, too, though. The concept of isox is that it helps blood to circulate - it dilates blood vessels. It's not clear that that would help a sore-heeled horse. But I don't think it's really clear that it helps anything, really, despite anecdotal improvements.

    He isn't necessarily lame but more on the side of not stepping up with his back and kind of off as well as not wanting to round and be on the bit which is how he normally travels......
    I feel as though it's arthritis setting in as well.....
    What are your thoughts?....Comments are in blue.

    What do I think? I think you need xrays, flexions, nerve blocks. It sounds like you don't have a diagnosis other than, 'he looks heel sore in his hind feet when he is longed.' I can't tell what was done. A video would help, so would pictures of feet.
     
  7. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I also wanted to ask, the Guy A and B that did the terrible job of shoeing....in what way was each terrible? Is there anything in their work that would account for heel pain in the hind feet?
     
  8. GotaDunQH

    GotaDunQH Senior Member

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    I love what Doc said in her reply. My older guy foundered too, some rotation, corrective shoeing and isoxuprine prescribed. I did the isoxuprine through the course of the scipt per vet instructions and then stopped when it ran out. Honestly, have not seen a difference since I stopped and he's moving sound.
     
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  9. doublelranch

    doublelranch Senior Member

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    I have also used isoxuprine. I didn't see a difference with it. What did fix the problem was good nutrition and proper trimming. This horse was extremely underweight when he was given to me. Sore feet with thin soles and underrun heels.
     
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